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kinmik
Jul 17, 2011

Dog, what are you doing? Get away from there.
You don't even have thumbs.


This past week when I was starving with not much to eat in the house, I made miso soup, threw some rice in, and topped with torn nori and furikake. It was like chazuke without the tea. Pretty drat delicious and filling to boot.

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hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


kinmik posted:

This past week when I was starving with not much to eat in the house, I made miso soup, threw some rice in, and topped with torn nori and furikake. It was like chazuke without the tea. Pretty drat delicious and filling to boot.

When you mix up your miso soup and rice that is called "neko-manma" or I guess something along the lines of "cat food/cat chow".

Laminator
Jan 18, 2004

You up for some serious plastic surgery?


Are there any ingredients that you think would be good to get while in Japan, like things that are going to be more difficult to find in the US? We have a pretty decent Asian market near our place in OKC, but it caters mostly to Vietnamese and Chinese cooking and its Japanese section is pretty sparse. Some things that I've grabbed are Okonomi sauce, Kewpie mayonnaise (I know you can get it on Amazon but eh). Maybe some good mirin?

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Laminator posted:

Are there any ingredients that you think would be good to get while in Japan, like things that are going to be more difficult to find in the US? We have a pretty decent Asian market near our place in OKC, but it caters mostly to Vietnamese and Chinese cooking and its Japanese section is pretty sparse. Some things that I've grabbed are Okonomi sauce, Kewpie mayonnaise (I know you can get it on Amazon but eh). Maybe some good mirin?

In a way, honestly not really, because what are you going to do when you run out of it?

Laminator
Jan 18, 2004

You up for some serious plastic surgery?


Make an excuse to go back to Japan, duh

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Laminator posted:

Make an excuse to go back to Japan, duh

I feel your pain since I lived in Saint Louis and Michigan and had less access to Japanese ingredients in those places.

Here are some places you can order online:

https://store.mitsuwa.com/mobile/storefront.aspx

http://www.marukaiestore.com/

http://www.hmart.com/index.asp

And of course, as you mentioned, Amazon. To some extent.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

Laminator posted:

Are there any ingredients that you think would be good to get while in Japan, like things that are going to be more difficult to find in the US? We have a pretty decent Asian market near our place in OKC, but it caters mostly to Vietnamese and Chinese cooking and its Japanese section is pretty sparse. Some things that I've grabbed are Okonomi sauce, Kewpie mayonnaise (I know you can get it on Amazon but eh). Maybe some good mirin?

If you can, get some real wasabi because the stuff they call "wasabi" in the US is actually horseradish with food coloring.

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Steve Yun posted:

If you can, get some real wasabi because the stuff they call "wasabi" in the US is actually horseradish with food coloring.

Got a feeling the customs guy isn't gonna like that, real wasabi is fresh grated so he'd have to bring back a plant.

Edit : to be more constructive, if you can find S&Bs Premium prepared wasabi in tube it is far closer to the real deal than the normal stuff at sushi restaurants stateside http://www.chopsticksny.com/content...w/2013/04/11050

hallo spacedog fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2015 around 05:51

CleverHans
Apr 25, 2011


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOsG4__3UzE

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


I'd take a shitload of miso and nihonshu.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Tried my hand at tonkotsu broth. It was darker than I wanted but I didn't spend a lot of time cleaning the bones.



It was amazing. Rich flavor, very filling, and the pork belly just melts in the mouth.

It's kind of liberating. I grew up in a strict no pork household. You could bring in pork (and get scolded every time) but cooking it was out of the question. I'll probably never make it again but this is like a middle finger to 18 years of being unable to have even pork bacon growing up.

Laminator
Jan 18, 2004

You up for some serious plastic surgery?


Chicken sashimi


Absolutely the most "out there" food I have eaten in Japan. I didn't even realize it was a thing. I had more trouble bringing myself to eat this than I did with fugu - it just goes against everything I've been taught about eating poultry growing up in the US.

It was nice, tasted like tuna. Hope I don't get Salmonella.

Anyone ever tried to make this with chicken in the US?

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


Laminator posted:

Anyone ever tried to make this with chicken in the US?

I sincerely would not ever recommend it. As far as I know it's not really home cooking in Japan either and something you would want to get from someone who really knows what they're doing.

Salmonella contamination has to do with the way chicken meat is processed after they are slaughtered. Like e. coli, as far as I'm aware, it's fecal contamination of the meat, so basically my feeling is that it's not really feasible to try making on your own unless you're absolutely sure how your chickens are processed, and even then probably not.

Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


yeah I'd advise against doing that - I wouldn't eat raw chicken if I was making italian food or something; it doesn't magically make it safe just by calling it sashimi

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


well, infections through eggs is not very likely anymore (we eat raw eggs, in mayo and half cooked eggs all the time)
and chicken seems to have way less chance of being salmonella infected as well due to more proper hygienic measures in the slaughtering process.

Still, I do not desire eating raw chicken, it might indeed be the whole thing being thaught it should be well baked, I dunno.
If it tastes like tuna, I'd rather eat tuna.

fun to learn about chicken sashimi being served in a restaurant though!

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Uh, chicken in a modern American industrial plant isn't exactly hygienic.

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


Mr. Wiggles posted:

Uh, chicken in a modern American industrial plant isn't exactly hygienic.

yeah, Dutch here, and it isn't exactly hygienic either, just more hygienic than it used to be,
still wouldn't feed it raw to my grandmother or my child if I had any of those, btw

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

hallo spacedog posted:

Got a feeling the customs guy isn't gonna like that, real wasabi is fresh grated so he'd have to bring back a plant.

Edit : to be more constructive, if you can find S&Bs Premium prepared wasabi in tube it is far closer to the real deal than the normal stuff at sushi restaurants stateside http://www.chopsticksny.com/content...w/2013/04/11050

A guy at a local plant sale was selling wasabi plants for growing at home. Sadly he'd sold out already.

Anyway, especially in the US it may be possible to order tubers in the mail to grow yourself. Apparently they're pretty unfussy - they don't even need direct sunlight.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Butcher your own chicken. The resulting food poisoning is much like a hangover, in being your own drat fault, and to be suffered with dignity. But also easily avoidable if you take care.

Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


Lead out in cuffs posted:

Anyway, especially in the US it may be possible to order tubers in the mail to grow yourself. Apparently they're pretty unfussy - they don't even need direct sunlight.

I thought they were extremely fussy which is why they're not grown on a large scale commercially and why we get that green horseradish as a result

al-azad
May 28, 2009



There's a sushi place I know that does toriwasa on request which is searing/boiling the chicken for like 5 seconds. Just long enough to create a white film and get rid of the slimy texture of raw chicken.

Not enough to kill germs by any means but I've seen it in America.

Sashimi
Dec 26, 2008


Suspect Bucket posted:

Butcher your own chicken. The resulting food poisoning is much like a hangover, in being your own drat fault, and to be suffered with dignity. But also easily avoidable if you take care.
I remember seeing a travel show in Japan, perhaps one of Bourdain's, where he tried chicken sashimi. They made a pretty big deal about the chef personally slaughtering and preparing the chicken just hours before his restaurant opened. The outside of the sashimi was also briefly cooked too.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

Riptor posted:

I thought they were extremely fussy which is why they're not grown on a large scale commercially and why we get that green horseradish as a result

I think it's more if you're trying to grow it at a large scale that it's fussy?

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29082091

It's also probably because I'm in the Pacific Northwest, which is apparently one of the few parts of the world suited to growing the stuff.

Force de Fappe
Nov 7, 2008



Made katsudon last night. It was good. Oyakodon donburi supremacy unchallenged.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Made Cooking With Dog's dango jiru (sans the dango). It was actually really good. Next time I'll have to make the dumplings, too. This time, though, I put a cup of cooked rice and cracked two large eggs into the remaining broth, turned it to simmer, and made some congee to split with my partner. Pretty good stuff, and I'm not even a big fan of chicken thighs. I hadn't used niboshi in a really long time and was pleasantly surprised that the broth didn't even have a hint of fishiness once it was all done.

Was going to make a fritter with the drained niboshi tomorrow, but my cats ate it all.

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


RedTonic posted:

Made Cooking With Dog's dango jiru (sans the dango). It was actually really good. Next time I'll have to make the dumplings, too. This time, though, I put a cup of cooked rice and cracked two large eggs into the remaining broth, turned it to simmer, and made some congee to split with my partner. Pretty good stuff, and I'm not even a big fan of chicken thighs. I hadn't used niboshi in a really long time and was pleasantly surprised that the broth didn't even have a hint of fishiness once it was all done.

Was going to make a fritter with the drained niboshi tomorrow, but my cats ate it all.

niboshi are really bitter to eat.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

hallo spacedog posted:

niboshi are really bitter to eat.

Maybe if you leave the stomach and head on. I found it to be pretty tasty when decapitated and eviscerated.

hallo spacedog
Apr 3, 2007

this chaos is killing me


RedTonic posted:

Maybe if you leave the stomach and head on. I found it to be pretty tasty when decapitated and eviscerated.

Fair enough, have never gone through the effort. Would usually just get fresh sardines.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

hallo spacedog posted:

Fair enough, have never gone through the effort. Would usually just get fresh sardines.

Sadly, fresh sardines are only occasionally available here. Which is a little weird for New England, I think, but I don't know much about fishin'. Last time I got some, I made iwashi no kanroni though. Quite good!

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



What are the best recipes for a single individual who just wants some simple-rear end dinner without a whole lot of seasoning/sauce preparation? I'm imagining something where I can get home, get the rice cooker going, and put together a few side dishes while the rice cooks. Staple dishes like miso soup, pickled veg, and the like are great, but I'd also like to learn about meat and egg dishes as well.

I really like the idea of cooking without relying heavily on complicated sauces or spices, and being able to compartmentalize your dishes into small chunks sounds like a great way to do batch meals - make a whole bunch of a few different dishes, fridge/freeze when you're done with them, then reheat when you get home and your rice is done. I've always been put off by the large amount of prep work and complication involved in other cuisines, so a simpler alternative would make it a lot easier to start cooking for myself.

edit: I also want to get into eating more vegetables, like radishes and cabbage and negi and the like.

Pollyanna fucked around with this message at Apr 15, 2015 around 22:59

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Cooking With Dog might be a good resource for you, then. Here's their youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=user?cookingwithdog?videos Most of their recipes are for one or two portions, have relatively easy to obtain ingredients, and don't rely on too many appliances. They're also generally veg-heavy. CwD has playlists for donburi, seafood, and various meats. The videos are sort and the ingredient lists and some notes are contained in the video descriptions.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

You wildly underestimated my liver's ability to metabolize toxins.

Freeze a lot of dashi in usable portions. One or two cups (and remember you can reduce it and rehydrate). That gives you more or less instant miso soup and a start to lots of other things.

I make a lot of nimono: http://justhungry.com/handbook/cook...red-dish-basics

You put together a broth (dashi, soy sauce, mirin, sake) and then simmer whatever in it. Tends to keep well and is low effort.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



I stopped by an asian market today, and all I could find for dashi powder was relatively small packages - a salt-shaker's worth, or a box of a few packets. Am I only supposed to use a small amount of dashi powder, or is it typically consumed in large quantities?

edit: If it helps, I got the box version of these.

Pollyanna fucked around with this message at Apr 17, 2015 around 01:44

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

Yes, that stuff is the concentrate. You shouldn't be using more than a teaspoon or so at a time or you will be mega-dosing on sodium. Think of it like stock powder (which is what it is).

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



RedTonic posted:

Cooking With Dog might be a good resource for you, then. Here's their youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=user?cookingwithdog?videos Most of their recipes are for one or two portions, have relatively easy to obtain ingredients, and don't rely on too many appliances. They're also generally veg-heavy. CwD has playlists for donburi, seafood, and various meats. The videos are sort and the ingredient lists and some notes are contained in the video descriptions.

I just wanna thank you for introducing this to me. Not only is this super helpful but it's also goddamn amazing.

YOU LIKE BUTTON!

Lead out in cuffs posted:

Yes, that stuff is the concentrate. You shouldn't be using more than a teaspoon or so at a time or you will be mega-dosing on sodium. Think of it like stock powder (which is what it is).

That explains it! Glad I don't have to buy a million of those.

What substitutes are there for dashi concentrate? It's basically powdered broth, so would other things like pork/beef/chicken broth/boullion/base work as well? (obviously it won't taste like dashi tho)

tonberrytoby
Feb 29, 2012

Gently enveloping the target with indiscriminate love.


Pollyanna posted:

What substitutes are there for dashi concentrate? It's basically powdered broth, so would other things like pork/beef/chicken broth/boullion/base work as well? (obviously it won't taste like dashi tho)
Fish broth base is OK for most recipes. But you will still notice the difference. You could throw in some seaweed if you have some.
The ingredients for real dashi stock are easy to store, too. But at least around here they are even harder to find then dashi concentrate.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Pollyanna posted:

I just wanna thank you for introducing this to me. Not only is this super helpful but it's also goddamn amazing.

YOU LIKE BUTTON!

I'm glad you like it! I found CwD via another goon's post (not sure whose, when, or what thread!) and love it.

You might like humblebeanblog.com as well. It's infrequently updated these days, but most of the Japanese recipes are manageable ingredient-wise and rarely involve truly gargantuan portions. I often feel like other websites are aiming recipes at people with either large families or frequent dinner parties, neither of which describes this DINK-rear end household...

Dashi stuff isn't too hard to source if you can find a Korean or Japanese market in your area or if you have something like a Whole Foods/Trader Joe's. In the former set of options, you should be able to get niboshi (dried sardines) and/or bonito flakes (shaved dehydrated skipjack tuna). In both sets of options, you should be able to find dehydrated kelp (konbu/kombu in Japanese, dashima in Korean). Some Chinese markets might carry the kelp labeled as 海带 or 'haidai'. If you can get the kelp, that's really all you need imo. You can use water from rehydrating dried shiitake mushrooms in addition or solo as a savory, vegan-friendly replacement, too.

PubicMice
Feb 14, 2012

looking for information on posts

I apologize if this is the wrong thread to ask this in, but I'm curious. Ever since I read this

Wikipedia posted:

Sushi (すし, 寿司, 鮨?) is a Japanese food consisting of cooked vinegared rice (鮨飯 sushi-meshi?) combined with other ingredients (ネタ neta?), seafood, vegetables and sometimes tropical fruits. Ingredients and forms of sushi presentation vary widely, but the ingredient which all sushi have in common is rice (also referred to as shari (しゃり?) or sumeshi (酢飯?)).

I've been searching. Does anyone know any good fruit sushi recipes? I've tried google, but it's hard to find ones that aren't just candy.

Riptor
Apr 13, 2003

here's to feelin' good all the time


sometimes they put mango on things i guess?

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Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

Planning a hanami picnic tomorrow. Totally last-minute, but there seem to be enough people keen on it (and a nice grove of Yoshino cherry trees near my house just at the showers-of-falling-blossoms stage).

I'm doing tamagoyaki, pink onigiri (using the red cabbage + acid trick from JustBento), and chicken karaage. A friend is keen to bring a gas stove and have people make their own okonomiyaki, too.

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