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ookuwagata
Aug 25, 2007

I love you this much!

This thread needs some chuuka food appreciation. Any good recipes for sara udon and gyoza?

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ookuwagata
Aug 25, 2007

I love you this much!

hallo spacedog posted:

That's actually a really interesting question since it's basically just a topping for rice, I've never heard of anyone cooking using it. So I consulted cookpad and... there isn't anything all that interesting. One person put some in their rice porridge, and another one was someone opened up a pacific saury, stuffed it with gohandesuyo, rolled it in karaage mix (you could just do salt and pepper and katakuriko or potato starch) and fried it.

I would think in this case it is worth experimenting with. Let me know how it turns out.

Regarding chuuka, I don't often cook a lot of it, though I made mabo nasu over the weekend. I do have a really good chuuka book in my storage unit though so if you can wait for a few days I'll dig it out and see what's in there.

That would be awesome.

As for natto, I think it's the texture that repels outsiders. Most westerners aren't familiar with food which has a... slime texture to it. They're not thinking really about the taste or smell (which isn't really ammonia-like to me, it's more of a leather or horse-blanket smell to me... which granted, doesn't sound any better) but I think it's the texture, to which the only similar thing they know is snot. I also know a lot of non-Asians which seem grossed out by an paste too; I think it's because for them, the only analogous texture for them would be refried beans. The flavor doesn't match up with their pre-defined experience with that texture and weirds them out.

ookuwagata
Aug 25, 2007

I love you this much!

hallo spacedog posted:

Yep, it is exactly that simple. I like the ones with shiso added for onigiri.

You can alternately put other pickles (like takana/pickled mustard greens are a good one) or you can put various stewed meat, chashu, tuna & mayonnaise, stewed konbu, ground stewed chicken, etc etc.

Matsutake and carrots cooked with some dashi broth is really great in onigiri.

ookuwagata
Aug 25, 2007

I love you this much!

Rocko Bonaparte posted:

Anybody have a link to an anal-retentive ramen writeup? I can bullshit something passable for dinner, but I think I've decided it's time I explored the details with a fine comb. I'm particularly looking for a red ramen that's spicy. It would have pork broth, but be mostly vegetables. I have the gist of soft-boiled eggs, matching noodles to broth, and those little things. However, I'd like to get something down to:

1. Exactly what cut of meat to use to get the right consistency in the broth.
2. Exact mix of vegetables.
3. A precise spice mix.
4. Which noodles to use with the given broth.

We have access to a pretty decent Asian market here where I expect I could get most everything.

Also, I might as well mention that years ago as a sophomore in college, I tried to make beefbowl. I never had it, and never have had a chance to have it. So I don't know if that darkish muck of beef that tasted kind of like fish flakes was anywhere near correct. Unfortunately, I'm assuming I probably nailed it straight on haha.

I have this book and just flipping through it, the thing is, there's no standard for the cuts of meat used or the exact mix of vegetables. I've seen the usage of chicken (often necks and feet), beef bones, beef, pork bones, pork meat, pork fat and venison(?)(apparently momiji is a euphemism for both venison and chicken feet), sanma, iwashi, katsuo and clams among other things. As far as vegetables (and fruits), generally you'll always see onions, garlic, ginger and green onion, but beyond that I've seen dried mushrooms, cabbage, carrots, nagaimo yam, pumpkin, apple, potato, tomato and even banana (in more than one recipe too). Ramen is more art than a science.

Generally speaking as for noodles, I think it's kind of a very general principle that as the broth gets thicker, heavier and stronger flavored, you use a thicker noodle. Light shio ramen I think usually is served with thinner noodles, and on the other end of the spectrum, tsukemen has very thick noodles and a very thick and strong soup.

ookuwagata fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2015 around 20:05

ookuwagata
Aug 25, 2007

I love you this much!

Personally, if you can find (or are willing to pay dearly for them) matsutake as they are in season, I like matsutake onigiri. You make matsutake gohan, which is basically just tossing in some cleaned, sliced matsutake into the rice cooker with dashi, then you mould it into onigiri. Sometimes I'll also cook a little chicken and stick that in the middle.

Ikura onigiri is also great.

If I'm going to pack onigiri for lunch, I prefer to keep the nori separate from the riceball in it's own bag. I'm not a fan of the way that nori becomes soft and adopts a wet-paper-like texture when you seal it in a bento or bag with the rice.

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