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rafikki
Mar 8, 2008

I see what you did there. (It's pretty easy, since ducks have a field of vision spanning 340 degrees.)

~SMcD

Yeah, thatís almost certainly a routing/ACL issue.

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Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Fun Shoe

Or the VPN concentrator is NATing all the clients onto the network rather than routing them

Super Soaker Party!
May 4, 2006

He may be a madposter but he's OUR madposter

Clapping Larry

I'm not gonna get into the VAT argument though I tend to agree it should be rolled in, but all the US'ians inexplicably defending either the free file options or the tax companies protecting their profits sound like goddamn Stockholm sufferers (or they work for Intuit). Guess what folks, the entire point is that YOU SHOULDN'T HAVE TO FILE TAXES. For the 95% of cases you're blathering about where free file works, it works because the numbers are easy and the government already knows them. There is absolutely NO reason other than pure profit motive from tax preparers that you should have to do a drat thing - the IRS should easily be able to calculate your income, taxes, and refund, and just send you a goddamn check (or a bill).

Complicated business situations, etc? Sure, still a reason to file. But the entire point is you've been duped once again by "rah rah America #1" bullshit into thinking that our system is somehow good, ignoring that every other civilized country just calculates the taxes for its citizens whenever possible and the entire loving concept of "everyone has to file a tax return" is completely alien to them, in the same way that "you only have one or two providers of Internet services to your location because the physical connection lines themselves are owned by a company rather than the company being forced to share them with whatever other competitors exist" makes no loving sense in countries that actually have competition.

As with Comcast and AT&T, Intuit in a reasonable world should be a quarter its size, but because the land that worships the loving "free market" has allowed companies to establish monopolies/duopolies and enshrine the situations that perpetuate those monopolies in law, we all get hosed and while the corporate boot is stamping on our faces some of you are exclaiming how shiny it is. Absurd.

Check this poo poo out:
https://www.taxpolicycenter.org/bri...urn-free-filing

"About 90 percent of taxpayers eligible for final withholding in the United Kingdom did not have to file in 2014."

Methanar
Sep 26, 2013
ASK ME ABOUT NOT TIPPING DELIVERY DRIVERS, OR ABOUT MY DIET OF CANNED BABY CORN AND CHICKEN NUGGETS


its a socialist make-work program

Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Take care with that! We have not fully ascertained its function, and the ticking is accelerating.


MF_James posted:

Yeah 95% of the time you can just do your taxes on turbotax or wherever, mail them in and it's free. The other 5% is like people with their own business, 1099 side work etc where you won't know about deductions or specific tax code stuff that you need to deal with; for those people it's useful to use a tax person otherwise just file yourself.

This. If you own property or do side gigs or 1099 work you should get an accountant. It turns out that there can be multiple places to claim any given deduction (or even half a deduction) to minimize your tax liability.

On two separate occasions involving real estate transactions involving a primary residence my accountant has saved me tens of thousands of dollars that fully expected to pay. When he pulled off the first one, saving me $28,000 I basically swore to use him forever.

Then he was killed by a drunk driver while bike riding so forever came faster than I thought.

Vargatron
Apr 19, 2008

MRAZZLE DAZZLE



rafikki posted:

Yeah, thatís almost certainly a routing/ACL issue.

My first thought went to "how did that router blow out it's knee??".

GreenNight
Feb 19, 2006
Turning the light on the darkest places, you and I know we got to face this now. We got to face this now.

Vargatron posted:

My first thought went to "how did that router blow out it's knee??".

There was too many hops.

Wibla
Feb 16, 2011


GreenNight posted:

There was too many hops.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



GreenNight posted:

There was too many hops.

Super Soaker Party!
May 4, 2006

He may be a madposter but he's OUR madposter

Clapping Larry

GreenNight posted:

There was too many hops.

RIP

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


So, I work for a company that has a bunch of web servers on AWS. We spin them up when they're needed from an Amazon Machine Image which has the Operating System, PHP, web server and database software installed, then we do about half an hour's work on AWS and on the server to do stuff like assign them an IP address, set hostnames, create uniquely-named databases, give them unique passwords and put them in our password management system and so on.

Higher ups are looking at automating the above process, and our devs have mentioned using Docker to streamline it - ideally getting to the point where you just fill in a web form and then everything above takes care of itself in a matter of minutes. I'm not exactly sure what Docker brings to the table, though, not having used Docker, and the devs - looking to use this project to learn Docker - don't really seem to know either.

I kinda get that Docker has recipes, so we could use it to create web servers, but that's pretty much what we already do with the Amazon Machine Image, right? Anything unique to that server would still require us to go in and specify it, or we could script it, but that wouldn't be any easier than scripting it on the system we've already got.

Is there some great benefit to using Docker to create web servers that I'm missing, here?

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


God damnit. I ran a KnowBe4 baseline phishing campaign but apparently we also got spammed by a legit phishing attack simultaneously so now our whole day is derailed just trying to sort out who got the real scam and who got our test email.
So far we are at 37 people who fell for the KnowBe4 email and who the gently caress knows how many got nailed by the real phishing attack. At least 6 confirmed so far.

Matt Zerella
Oct 7, 2002


Gort posted:

So, I work for a company that has a bunch of web servers on AWS. We spin them up when they're needed from an Amazon Machine Image which has the Operating System, PHP, web server and database software installed, then we do about half an hour's work on AWS and on the server to do stuff like assign them an IP address, set hostnames, create uniquely-named databases, give them unique passwords and put them in our password management system and so on.

Higher ups are looking at automating the above process, and our devs have mentioned using Docker to streamline it - ideally getting to the point where you just fill in a web form and then everything above takes care of itself in a matter of minutes. I'm not exactly sure what Docker brings to the table, though, not having used Docker, and the devs - looking to use this project to learn Docker - don't really seem to know either.

I kinda get that Docker has recipes, so we could use it to create web servers, but that's pretty much what we already do with the Amazon Machine Image, right? Anything unique to that server would still require us to go in and specify it, or we could script it, but that wouldn't be any easier than scripting it on the system we've already got.

Is there some great benefit to using Docker to create web servers that I'm missing, here?

I'd be looking at Packer, not Docker here.

Packer/Ansible builds your AMI and configures it and then creates an AMI.

Cao Ni Ma
May 25, 2010


regulargonzalez posted:

Computer 1 : laptop on home connection, vpn'd into work network

Computer 2: work computer on the internal work network

Is there any way to get rdp or dameware to let computer 2 connect to computer 1? Doesn't seem possible.

I can do it from our network, but I cant use their hostname. I have to find their IP and then use it to dameware into the machine. I can remote directly from my work laptop while teleworking, or I RDP into my office workstation and then dameware into them.

The networking team doesn't provide us with access to the ASAs so we just use a powershell script to sweep the ASAs IP ranges and provide us who is using which IP so when they call in for support we already know which to remote into.

Nuclearmonkee
Jun 10, 2009




Cao Ni Ma posted:

I can do it from our network, but I cant use their hostname. I have to find their IP and then use it to dameware into the machine. I can remote directly from my work laptop while teleworking, or I RDP into my office workstation and then dameware into them.

The networking team doesn't provide us with access to the ASAs so we just use a powershell script to sweep the ASAs IP ranges and provide us who is using which IP so when they call in for support we already know which to remote into.

Always annoys me when people do this. Itís trivial to build a user thatís only authorized to show VPN specific commands and nothing else. Or you can even make a little page that displays the information for you that the help desk folks or whoever else needs it can see.

captaingimpy
Aug 3, 2004

I luv me some pirate booty, and I'm not talkin' about the gold!

Fun Shoe

Gort posted:

So, I work for a company that has a bunch of web servers on AWS. We spin them up when they're needed from an Amazon Machine Image which has the Operating System, PHP, web server and database software installed, then we do about half an hour's work on AWS and on the server to do stuff like assign them an IP address, set hostnames, create uniquely-named databases, give them unique passwords and put them in our password management system and so on.

Higher ups are looking at automating the above process, and our devs have mentioned using Docker to streamline it - ideally getting to the point where you just fill in a web form and then everything above takes care of itself in a matter of minutes. I'm not exactly sure what Docker brings to the table, though, not having used Docker, and the devs - looking to use this project to learn Docker - don't really seem to know either.

I kinda get that Docker has recipes, so we could use it to create web servers, but that's pretty much what we already do with the Amazon Machine Image, right? Anything unique to that server would still require us to go in and specify it, or we could script it, but that wouldn't be any easier than scripting it on the system we've already got.

Is there some great benefit to using Docker to create web servers that I'm missing, here?

How is it decided when you need new servers? Is it load/performance based, or is it something like you need to setup a new customer? Is the DB software an actual database or is it something like a connector?

I'd look at CloudFormation, Ansible, Terraform, or Jenkins utilizing some or all of previously mentioned tools if you want a mash button make magic happen webpage before going down the docker route, especially if no one has experience in it.

Also, you typically don't want to do something that requires you to touch a docker container after it has been spun up. They're meant to be treated like cattle. Docker can do some really great things, but it can be a real PITA at times. For example, logging can be painful to manage, especially if the apps don't already have a good logging mechanism in place. I've also had a docker container come up in a dev environment that set off our A/V-Malware tool. Come to find out a developer grabbed a random docker image from a random registry that was loaded with all kinds of goodies. It was good that that happened though, because it allowed us to put a process in place for docker images and moving them through the different environments.

All of that to say, Docker is a great tool when used correctly and that I'd take some time to figure out if it's the right tool in your situation.

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

oh man this is too beautiful not to share:

So our vpn software needs to be upgraded.
Seems simple enough right? Push out a new package over SCCM and uninstall the old one. We can't just upgrade unfortunately and users can't install it themselves.
Boss doesn't trust that it will work, so I said 'okay' and washed my hands of the whole thing.
He passed the task to my manager to 'solutionize' and his idea was to have literally every employee schedule a time to come in and have their software upgraded. One at a time, during a pandemic, giving no consideration to out of state workers.
He didn't even make a loving calendar for people to pick a time/date and schedule themselves. He literally just asked the entire org to reply to his email.

At this rate he might finish manually creating all the appointments sometime next month.

This is loving beautiful. I'm taking the rest of the week off.

e: oh my god he's not even sending calendar invites, he is literally just scheduling them all on his calendar and sending a separate confirmation email.

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

God damnit. I ran a KnowBe4 baseline phishing campaign but apparently we also got spammed by a legit phishing attack simultaneously so now our whole day is derailed just trying to sort out who got the real scam and who got our test email.
So far we are at 37 people who fell for the KnowBe4 email and who the gently caress knows how many got nailed by the real phishing attack. At least 6 confirmed so far.

Okay so update on this:
Apparently it is an absolute poo poo show with people trying to schedule times to come in (big surprise). Manager is completely unable to keep up with requests and tons of poo poo is getting lost in his email. People are sending requests, then requests to change those requests, and manager is all the while trying to figure out how to use this new M$ Bookings app to keep track and failing miserably.

Simultaneously, literally nobody knows ANYTHING (including IT at my boss' request) about the phishing campaign I launched and we are getting inundated with emails about that which further exacerbates the 'lost appoint email' problem.
Pile on the fact that there are apparently now 3 actual real life phishing campaigns that have nailed at least a dozen people (that self reported) and you have a full on hurricane of shitfuck.

Good thing I'm off for the rest of the week.

I did answer my boss' phone call though. He pleaded with me to drop what I'm doing and "help somehow" but I just politely explained that I could not. Furthermore "It's not 'just this one time.' Something of this nature always seems to happen every time I take even a day or two off and I can't drop what I'm doing to swoop in and save the day again. You all are more than capable of figuring out a way to mitigate this. I believe in you. Besides, if I don't respect my time off then nobody else will either and I will continue to be put in a position where I'm going to lose PTO at the end of the year because I didn't use it. OOOOPS I gotta go, good luck, bye!"

I haven't bothered answering my manager's calls though. gently caress that guy. He caused his own nightmare.

Methanar
Sep 26, 2013
ASK ME ABOUT NOT TIPPING DELIVERY DRIVERS, OR ABOUT MY DIET OF CANNED BABY CORN AND CHICKEN NUGGETS

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

I did answer my boss' phone call though.

I haven't bothered answering my manager's calls though. gently caress that guy. He caused his own nightmare.

Your boss and manager are different people?

Thanatosian
Apr 16, 2013

Angrier, Bitterer Man


Grimey Drawer

Irritated Goat posted:

I see a lot of others with my issue and I kinda feel even worse. 42, still in Helldesk. I've done server administration and O365 and I'm just so tired of resetting user passwords and fixing pop up blockers. I've honestly considered getting out of IT but nothing else even remotely interests me where I could support my family let alone put any kind of dent in the huge medical and student debt I have. Retiring is a joke. I can't even tell myself studying will get me any closer to where I want.

This is from a few pages back, but I just want to say that I was in helldesk for seven years at a super-toxic place, got into helldesk at a much better place after, and was promoted to a sysadmin level job after a little less than a year. I was 35 at the time, you really just need to hit the right combination of working hard and (more importantly) luck.

After four years in my current position, I'm starting to look for what I hope is my last employer now (large institutions, mostly public; I'd like to get in on that public pension gravy train while I'm still young enough to get 20 years in). It feels like it will never get better, until it all of a sudden does.

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


Methanar posted:

Your boss and manager are different people?

Well by boss I mean my department head. The only other person that outranks me is my manager but I still report 99% of everything to $Boss anyway. Functionally, my manager is just there to be a mouthpiece for my boss to other departments. My manager doesn't actually "manage" anything. Or do anything really, besides shadow my $Boss everywhere.

Thanatosian
Apr 16, 2013

Angrier, Bitterer Man


Grimey Drawer

Getting caught up with the thread:

Re: Tax stuff in the US: Hasan Minhaj did a great explanation of this, taxes in America loving suck, and if you think otherwise, you are objectively wrong:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xQQkzWhMOc


Re: working for unethical places: no ethical consumption under capitalism. That being said, I've been looking for a new job for over a year now, and I find that most of the jobs I'm qualified for are with consulting companies or MSPs, which I don't like either ethically or practically. I'm old enough now that I'm really trying to find a place I can work for for the rest of my life, and that I don't feel bad about, which means I've mostly been looking at government positions that fully kosher (i.e. no pork) and don't involve the military. So, I've been super picky, and apply for maybe 5-6 jobs a month. I know local government jobs around here typically get 1000+ applicants, so I'm trying to take comfort in the fact that I've interviewed as often as I have, and not get discouraged. For those of you in those dream jobs (well-compensated, feel good about the Effect of the employment on the world, been in the same place for 10+ years), how did you land there?

alg
Mar 14, 2007



Thanatosian posted:

Getting caught up with the thread:

Re: Tax stuff in the US: Hasan Minhaj did a great explanation of this, taxes in America loving suck, and if you think otherwise, you are objectively wrong:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xQQkzWhMOc


Re: working for unethical places: no ethical consumption under capitalism. That being said, I've been looking for a new job for over a year now, and I find that most of the jobs I'm qualified for are with consulting companies or MSPs, which I don't like either ethically or practically. I'm old enough now that I'm really trying to find a place I can work for for the rest of my life, and that I don't feel bad about, which means I've mostly been looking at government positions that fully kosher (i.e. no pork) and don't involve the military. So, I've been super picky, and apply for maybe 5-6 jobs a month. I know local government jobs around here typically get 1000+ applicants, so I'm trying to take comfort in the fact that I've interviewed as often as I have, and not get discouraged. For those of you in those dream jobs (well-compensated, feel good about the Effect of the employment on the world, been in the same place for 10+ years), how did you land there?

State employee here, I work for an agency with a mission I really support. Literally....I played nerd games with someone who worked here. He told me to apply, and the hiring manager (a true mentor and someone I really respect) saw I went to the same university as he did and interviewed me. It took 9 months from application to hiring but it has been worth it. I've tripled my salary in 5 years (I was making peanuts at a very very large tech company before), I'm on a leadership track (team lead right now) and I love it. The work/life balance hasn't been great since we went home for COVID, but it mostly comes down to supporting COVID projects that have to be out the door fast. Been here just over 5 years now so I'm vested in my pension, have health care in retirement, etc. I can see myself retiring from here someday, I'm almost 40 now.

I will say a lot of government jobs now are focusing on diversity (for a good reason) and many give preference to military veterans. Many are also specifically looking to hire people living with disabilities.

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


alg posted:

State employee here, I work for an agency with a mission I really support. Literally....I played nerd games with someone who worked here. He told me to apply, and the hiring manager (a true mentor and someone I really respect) saw I went to the same university as he did and interviewed me. It took 9 months from application to hiring but it has been worth it. I've tripled my salary in 5 years (I was making peanuts at a very very large tech company before), I'm on a leadership track (team lead right now) and I love it. The work/life balance hasn't been great since we went home for COVID, but it mostly comes down to supporting COVID projects that have to be out the door fast. Been here just over 5 years now so I'm vested in my pension, have health care in retirement, etc. I can see myself retiring from here someday, I'm almost 40 now.

I will say a lot of government jobs now are focusing on diversity (for a good reason) and many give preference to military veterans. Many are also specifically looking to hire people living with disabilities.

This is my story to the "T" except I'm slightly younger and have a terrible work/life balance, which I am trying to fix.

12 rats tied together
Sep 7, 2006



Gort posted:

Is there some great benefit to using Docker to create web servers that I'm missing, here?

Sort of but it's at an entirely different level than what you're dealing with and where your coworkers seem to think the benefits are as well. For your developers, the thing that runs on their dev workstation is identical to the thing that runs in the staging environment which is identical to the thing that runs in production. The docker image becomes an immutable artifact that you can safely make assumptions about -- if it works somewhere it will work everywhere unless you specifically design it to violate this. There's a larger discussion here about how this allows them to segment services in a much more reproducible and sane manner, which will let them significantly reduce the dependency list for an average application. If done correctly this is a huge productivity boost for experienced engineers and drastically reduces onboarding time for new engineers.

As IT/Ops, the main thing that changes is the contract between ops and dev. The only thing you need to do to get a machine into a place where it can serve your application is install the docker daemon on it. No more java license agreements, .net framework updates, django apps accidentally running off of system python 2.7.13, anything like that. That responsibilty now falls onto the dev team, since in order to build their containers in the first place they need to pick a base image, which implies an OS and a set of installed dependencies.

This sort of thing is what going big into docker gets you. It's an execution layer solution and has nothing to do with automating server builds in AWS.

12 rats tied together fucked around with this message at 20:00 on Sep 17, 2020

Antioch
Apr 18, 2003


Grimey Drawer

I got insanely lucky with this job. I was let go in April, ostensibly due to COVID but really probably due to calling my VP a hollow-souled corporate disaster with zero management ability.

I skipped about for 6 weeks on EI and CERB, did some courses, hung out with my dog. Then I got an interview at my current job. It's 6 minutes from my house, I got a title and pay jump, and a ton of responsibility with a boss and co-workers that trust me, and I trust them. We make pet food - probably the closest I can get in Alberta to ethical work at this point.

Anyway as for how, I don't know. I'm pretty good at what I do and I guess I interview well. The big thing my boss said about why I was successful was because I showed a lot of passion for the future and sounded like I had "big dreams". He's not wrong - I applied for the position knowing I'd be dragging the company out of a shitshow of MSP managed nonsense, and it's been tough and a lot of work, but we're making progress and it feels really good. We have a budget! I got approval for 500k in servers and storage, and I'm building a plan to move a lot of stuff into Azure. It's been great so far. I can bring my dog in to the office once we're through the COVID restrictions (in like 6 years).

I don't have any advice for finding the best job. I went through some absolute dogshit. I probably don't deserve the position I'm in right now but by god I am going to earn it.

devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


Thanatosian posted:

For those of you in those dream jobs (well-compensated, feel good about the Effect of the employment on the world, been in the same place for 10+ years), how did you land there?

While Iíve only been here for 3.5 years, I could easily see myself here for 10+ as long as things with the work environment stay the same. My company works in the healthcare space without the burden of HIPPAA, thankfully. The work that our employees do has a significant impact on patient safety and the quality of care that they receive. We have been heavily involved in Covid response efforts nationwide especially with the initial shortage of ventilators.

About a year ago my daughter had a nasty bug that dehydrated her badly and she went in for an IV. I had to stay home with the other kids, but I felt a million times better knowing that my companyís sticker was on the IV infusion pump putting saline into her.

How did I get this job? Honestly, I got lucky. I had applied about 3 years prior to the same position with this company but didnít quite have enough experience at the time for what they were looking for. I saw an article in the local business paper that mentioned the company and how an outside investment firm was dumping tons of money in. Went in, rocked the interview, and that was that. Now Iím one of the more senior members on the team and the go to guy (for better or worse) for many, many things.

devmd01 fucked around with this message at 23:13 on Sep 17, 2020

Methanar
Sep 26, 2013
ASK ME ABOUT NOT TIPPING DELIVERY DRIVERS, OR ABOUT MY DIET OF CANNED BABY CORN AND CHICKEN NUGGETS

Antioch posted:

I got insanely lucky with this job. I was let go in April, ostensibly due to COVID but really probably due to calling my VP a hollow-souled corporate disaster with zero management ability.

I skipped about for 6 weeks on EI and CERB, did some courses, hung out with my dog. Then I got an interview at my current job. It's 6 minutes from my house, I got a title and pay jump, and a ton of responsibility with a boss and co-workers that trust me, and I trust them. We make pet food - probably the closest I can get in Alberta to ethical work at this point.

Anyway as for how, I don't know. I'm pretty good at what I do and I guess I interview well. The big thing my boss said about why I was successful was because I showed a lot of passion for the future and sounded like I had "big dreams". He's not wrong - I applied for the position knowing I'd be dragging the company out of a shitshow of MSP managed nonsense, and it's been tough and a lot of work, but we're making progress and it feels really good. We have a budget! I got approval for 500k in servers and storage, and I'm building a plan to move a lot of stuff into Azure. It's been great so far. I can bring my dog in to the office once we're through the COVID restrictions (in like 6 years).

I don't have any advice for finding the best job. I went through some absolute dogshit. I probably don't deserve the position I'm in right now but by god I am going to earn it.

hell yeah

AlternateAccount
Apr 25, 2005
FYGM

Thanatosian posted:


...taxes in America loving suck, and if you think otherwise, you are objectively wrong


Is there anyone that actually makes this argument?

The Fool
Oct 16, 2003



Unless youíre in your 60ís it is highly unlikely you are going to get your ďlast jobĒ

Itís just not really a thing anymore.

Wizard of the Deep
Sep 25, 2005


It's hard to read all these "I've found my last job" posts. I thought I'd found a place I could reasonably expect to spend the rest of my career: A big, financial management place with AUM in the hundreds of billions, with a moderate, well-planned strategy for modernization and cloud optimization. Me joining the team had a significant impact on both the average age of the department and the average length of tenure. I was one of the few people who hadn't been in the company in one fashion or another for over a decade.

That all came crashing down last year when we found out that our department was being outsourced and offshored. Roughly two-thirds of my group was given walking papers. Between the Trump corporate giveaways and some festering political wounds, the company decided almost 200 years of institutional knowledge was no longer necessary.

A year later, I'm working at a worse job and making less money. Thankfully, I got in well before the pandemic crashed down on us, but I'm still mad and heartbroken.

Even if you think everything is roses and sunshine, keep your gently caress-you money liquid and your resume polished. You may not see the axe coming, but that won't stop it.

CLAM DOWN
Feb 13, 2007


RICKARUS

It's Moot baby!




That entirely and completely depends on where you are and the type of org you work for. I've absolutely found my last job.

Thanatosian
Apr 16, 2013

Angrier, Bitterer Man


Grimey Drawer

Yeah, what I'm taking from these is "keep pounding away, keep your eyes open, be friendly with people in your industry, and when an opportunity presents itself, jump on it."

I feel like my "marathon, not sprint" strategy is probably a good one, and if it takes another year or two to land a job at the employer I want, I can live with that; I don't hate my current job, I love my team, I like my boss, it's pretty secure as far as that goes these days, and I make enough that I'm stashing away a decent chunk of change every year, so I can hold like this for quite awhile, even if I'm overworked and underpaid.

Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Fun Shoe

It only takes one buyout from an investment bank to poo poo all over your plans

CLAM DOWN
Feb 13, 2007


RICKARUS

It's Moot baby!




Thanks Ants posted:

It only takes one buyout from an investment bank to poo poo all over your plans

Lol a bank cannot buy out my org. Like I said, it depends on a lot of factors whether something is a safe/longterm gig or not.

Thanatosian
Apr 16, 2013

Angrier, Bitterer Man


Grimey Drawer

Thanks Ants posted:

It only takes one buyout from an investment bank to poo poo all over your plans

Investment banks are legally prohibited from buying out my current employer, but yeah, I have a healthy paranoia and about two years of living expenses stashed, assuming my roommate moved out tomorrow.

bull3964
Nov 18, 2000

DO YOU HEAR THAT? THAT'S THE SOUND OF ME PATTING MYSELF ON THE BACK.




I'm at over 12 years. Kinda. But Not really.

Started in 2008
Had at least 3 title changes and expansion in responsibilities (with good pay jumps)
Acquired in 2015
I've changed roles a further 3 times since then also with decent pay jumps when taking on something new.

I can't say I've found a forever location. But for the moment I'm happish, have good pay, decent benefits, a good team, stress isn't too bad, I'm I'm working on new stuff that barely even existed when we were acquired 5 years ago.

The main reason why I can't say I've found a forever location is you can never be sure what's going to happen with the company itself. As long as I keep learning new marketable skills and I get compensated well for the amount of work I put in, I'm fine with staying put. I'm at the point now that it would take like a >100% increase in income to change my lifestyle and I don't see that as realistic so I'm not going to expend a lot of energy min/maxing a few thousand bucks here or there. But if the situation gets untenable somehow, I'm confident I have the experience and skillset to land on my feet somewhere else and I have plenty of savings to allow me to job hunt a decent place.

Not that it matters since we are in the end days of the republic. I should be assembling my mad max style armor right now and stockpiling guzzoline.

devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


Thanks Ants posted:

It only takes one buyout from an investment bank to poo poo all over your plans

This is my only fear with this job. Weíve been held with 51% control by a private equity firm for over 3 years now and literally doubled our employee count through an acquisition of our biggest competitor. We are literally the largest company in our space nationwide.

The timeline is likely fast approaching where they will want to cash out in some fashion, be it selling off to the next equity firm or going public. Iíve been at a place that went publicly traded about a year after I joined and yeah, not impressed with that process and what it does to a company.

bull3964
Nov 18, 2000

DO YOU HEAR THAT? THAT'S THE SOUND OF ME PATTING MYSELF ON THE BACK.




Yeah, that's the one thing I don't like about where I'm working. Being a publicly traded company is a loving drain on everything and causes some pretty negative outcomes a lot of the time.

chin up everything sucks
Jan 29, 2012



My company has a rumored "reverse merger" coming up so we can IPO quickly. I have no idea how this will work or what it will do to/for my position.

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jaegerx
Sep 10, 2012

Maybe this post will get me on your ignore list!



Grimey Drawer

If you get a new vp out of it, just start looking for a new job cause youíre gonna be contracted out.

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