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Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

DrAlexanderTobacco posted:

Might as well start this off with some bragging!

Got a new job. £5k raise, mostly the same sort of stuff I'm doing now. Not exactly the upward movement I was looking for, but my old company was acquired recently and they're shifting direction a tad.

I was asked in the interview if I had any experience with Linux servers. I said no, but I at least know not to run rm -rf * - which got a few laughs, and I got to feel all

rm -rf * won't do anything on a modern system.

You have to run rm -rf * --no-preserve-root or rm -rf /* if you want to wipe out the system for some reason.

(congrats on the new job!)

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Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

rocket posted:

In a previous job, one of the regular maintenance tasks was manually deleting old deleted email from the email servers. You had to go into the directory and do 'rm -rf *' to clear it out and make space when the servers started to get full. the path was something like /taurus/home/users/trash. I accidently did this from one directory above, when I had already been up all night on call. Luckily my genius boss used DRBD to mirror the servers, and figured out how to restore the data from the shadow copy/cache, but it still took more than a day to restore.
I was told the method for doing this maintenance, but was told after the fact there was also a script I could run.

This was even on CentOS, but not the secure version.

I had a similar slip-up doing manual SQL database updates in MySQL something like 'update users=suspended where a equals'. Basically I didn't complete the statement and accidently hit enter, so it affected a poo poo-ton of users and froze up the MySQL server for a while.

This was when I thought maybe I had ADHD... (and I did.)

It's okay, what I read the thing I replied to as was rm -rf /, not rm -rf *

Me dumb, no read.

rm -rf * will work anywhere, and it's appropriate at times, but yeah, you have to be careful.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

I just got a linkedin message asking me if I'd be interested in the following mouthful: "Staff Tools Application Operations Engineer on the CTO Dev Application Operations team"

No, gently caress off. If the job name can't fit onto a normal business card, I don't want it.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

high six posted:

So I've got a third interview for a junior network admin/helpdesk position with a local ISP coming up soon. I'm hoping it goes well. I aced the technical questions they gave me in the second interview, so, I guess they liked me. If everything goes well, it'll be my first real non-minimum wage job.

Generally the only way to not get a job after a 3rd interview is to really put one of the interviewers off. Don't say racist poo poo or whatever.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

whaam posted:

Do most of you guys have a plan to move into management or project management as you get closer to 40? You don't see many systems engineers, administrators, etc in the 40-55 age range. Is that just due to our industry being so new, or is the usual path into management the only way to avoid being aged out of the industry?

I'm in a senior technical position right now (systems engineer) but often think that I need a plan to move up even though I'm perfectly happy at the moment. My city is too small to have any real opportunities to specialize in one area and I'm too firmly planted with family to move to a bigger city. I keep an eye on the job listings and I rarely see senior technical positions come up and when they do they seem to match my current duties pretty closely.

What is the long term path for someone like me? (Early 30s) I've already moved away from day to day administration to strictly design and project work, but I'd hate to think I've peaked already... For the record though I do enjoy what I do now, and the money is great.

I think that historically the thought process was that if a person is good at their job they should surely be a manager. Some companies/people still think this way, but it's not as absolute.

There's plenty of room to grow basically forever working at a terminal/workbench/whatever. A lot of big companies have a career track that runs parallel to management - team lead/senior engineer, department head/principal engineer, director/fellow engineer, and so on.

If you want to literally run a company, then yeah, you have to go into management. But if you just want to get paid more money to be smart, then there are companies that would love to do that, because they're starting to realize that being good as an engineer doesn't mean you will be good as a manager.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

go3 posted:

Only managers that don't know how to dump it all off on an underling get fired.

Middle managers often find themselves out of work or shuffled into a bullshit job after a regime change. Much in the same way that the new alpha in a pride of lions kills all of the cubs that weren't fathered by him, new senior leadership replace leaders they didn't put in place.

They're also a fun and easy way to show investors/customers/feds/whatever that you're totally making changes to improve things without actually affecting the day to day workflow, or really changing anything at all.

E: pysude: no my job offers basically no tuition reimbursement. They will, however, buy me all of the books I can read, and pay for any certs I get. Last job was the same.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

CLAM DOWN posted:

I would really like to meet the sysadmin in Vancouver, BC that makes 150k/year. Location is everything.

Meanwhile here in the glorious bay area of outrageous real estate prices, 150k is decidedly midrange, though I have no experience with internal IT - just support and operations, so maybe it's a lot different.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

CLAM DOWN posted:

Haha please, Vancouver is the worst/most expensive real estate market in Canada, and one of the worst in North America. Salaries here generally have trouble matching cost of living, it's pretty rough for the average person here.

I'm not sure I understand the point of your comment.

Are you trying to argue that where you live sucks?

You've convinced me, I won't move to Vancouver.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Wearing jeans and a t-shirt to an interview crew, checking in.

Granted, they told me point blank that they would make fun of me if I wore a suit.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

We don't even have a parking lot. Also nobody has ever asked me what car I drive, including when I was interviewing to be a delivery driver.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

I drive a 2014 Focus ST.

Leasing 4 lyfe.

When this lease is up I'm going to either not have a car (if I stay in the city) or get a JCW mini or something.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Tab8715 posted:

Has anyone without a degree hit any stumbling blocks? Or actually have been denied a position because they didn't have a degree?

I haven't had any problems... So far...

I haven't had any problems, but as evol262 alluded to, if you ever want to have a title with "Director" in it at a big/old company, a bachelor's is a non-negotiable requirement.

Generally speaking, the east coast is a bit stiffer and more old fashioned than the west coast (in the US) and if you're looking to stay "pure tech" and shoot for principal engineering type roles then you can get there without a degree, but a degree certainly is not going to hurt you regardless of what you want to do.

If you think you might ever want to be upper management, you should get a degree.

Edit: also I guess if the distinction is important to you, I work in infrastructure/ops and I've never worked internal IT, so I can't speak to the ecosystem there at all. I just do the linux.

Comradephate fucked around with this message at 15:58 on Aug 15, 2014

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Tab8715 posted:

What's the difference between internal IT and Ops?

Sounds the same to me...

I work with/on the infrastructure for the website (I work at a company whose product is a website) while internal IT maintains the VPN, workstations, office network, email, printers, etc.

My "users" are software engineers and I don't know a single thing about printers, basically.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

At any tech company whose primary presence is online (Facebook, Twitter, any startup with an app that is going to ~change the world~, mobile games, etc.) is going to have infra/ops be separate from IT.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

mayodreams posted:

The primary reason is that a 4 year degree is a huge commitment monetarily and to starting what you finish.

Anecdotally, I've heard that Google actually looks at incomplete degrees in a more negative light than no degree for this reason - they want you to demonstrate that you can finish what you start.

I personally know two people who I would consider solid candidates who were told to finish their degree and then apply again, but I also know people with no degree who hold similar roles to the jobs being interviewed for.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

I feel like the topic is kind of beaten to death at this point. If you are a person who can flourish without a degree, you probably already know. If you're not sure, but you are sure you want to work in technology, then go to college.

Some companies will only hire people with degrees, some companies prefer people with degrees, some don't care, and a few probably value people without degrees. There will always be companies you're not a good fit for. Unless you know you want to work at $SOME_COMPANY, just do the thing that gives you the best odds of long-term happiness - whatever that means for you.

Docjowles posted:



Certs aren't an alternative to a college degree, and vice versa. They're complimentary.

I'm only doing this because we're discussing soft skills and education: complementary, not complimentary.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Misogynist posted:

Lots of people put a decade of work into becoming a doctor just to find out that they aren't emotionally able to deal with the loss of a patient. If they were already experienced enough to be working in private practice, though, then that is weird.

Sometimes people just want to do something else for a living. If you're a neurosurgeon you are smart enough and/or dedicated enough to pick up basically any other skill in short order.

Obviously deciding to not be a surgeon anymore is a bigger deal than deciding to not be a windows admin anymore, but I'm sure some people hate it so much that they're comfortable with abandoning the decade of schooling to do something else.

E: I know someone who went to law school with my dad. After the very first semester he decided he didn't want to be an attorney, but would finish law school anyway because "It might be fun." - after law school he went to medical school and is currently a flight surgeon/neurosurgeon.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

go3 posted:

Get a degree that way when you can't find a job you can at least still feel superior to the people without one.

I know of no fewer than 5 people from my graduating class in high school who were very openly condescending towards me when I didn't go to college who are now underemployed doing menial jobs or are completely unemployed with their bachelor's degree. Meanwhile I'm making drastically above average income in a very expensive city despite spending 3 years as a semi-nomadic drunk before deciding to actually pursue a career.

I hope their degree makes them feel superior to me, because they certainly need something to comfort them while they make the schedule at Panera.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Misogynist posted:

I hate to be that guy, but it's worth pointing out that being hired for your self-taught skills is way more likely to work out if you're born a male of an unobjectionable ethnic group (or at least sound like one on your resume).

Do you have actual evidence of this or are you just looking to stir the pot?

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Sepist posted:

Are companies in DC area willing to help attain a security clearance for the right candidate? I am aiming for pre-sales in the DC area for my next move but I don't want to screw myself over by not having the clearance already before applying in the area.

It's much like anything else with a high up-front cost; they'll foot the bill if they think you are an amazing applicant with a very good chance of receiving clearance... unless an adequate applicant who already has clearance applies. Especially true for TS/SCI because an SSBI will take an indeterminate amount of time and cost many thousands of dollars.

As for footing the bill yourself, it's my understanding that it's not really an option. You can't just decide that you want clearance and go through the process. An organization with classified information, or at least an organization looking to hire someone who will require access to classified information has to make the request to the appropriate agency.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Re: metabolism.

I share the pet peeve that evol262 apparently has.

It's fun asking my friends with "high metabolisms" track what they eat.

When left to my own devices I've settled in around 170lbs with no muscle mass worth noting.

After 2 weeks straight of drinking in my hometown I am sure I'm a bit more. Finally getting back to the gym when I get home.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Sheep posted:

I just got promoted from pseudo-management where it was just me and my machines to "now you have people reporting to you" management. I understand that there is this ITIL thing that I should probably look into, but can anyone else provide some sort of "you're now managing people in IT" bullet points so I can figure out what just happened? My only management experience with actual people prior to this was as a high school teacher, which isn't really relevant in the slightest to what I do now.

If the people who report to you are trustworthy, let them do their jobs. Micromanagement breeds contempt. Of course you should be aware of what they are all working on, but make it personal and non-intrusive. If you introduce a shitload of metrics and are constantly asking for status updates, they will just find ways to look like they're working a lot without working a lot, simply out of spite.

If your department is performing as expected and you feel like you don't do anything, then you did it, you won at management. Your job is ultimately to ensure that your subordinates can do their jobs. Get people out of their way.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Backups are a really easy sell unless your boss actually wants to be unemployed.

It's completely trivial to find information about how frequently businesses never come back from catastrophic data losses, because companies like Carbonite who have a vested interest in selling you backup services have already done all of the research.

Spoiler alert: the numbers do not favour companies that don't make and test backups regularly.

Crap quality routers and stuff suck for you, but they do technically get the job done, so it's probably not a priority. Having and testing functional backups has a very good chance of being the difference between still being a business in 5 years or not being a business in 5 years.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

evol262 posted:

Contractors are a fixed expense for a fixed time span, though, which is an easier sell on the budget

Plus they're a way around bureaucratic nonsense.

My team has no headcount for a new hire, but it does have an unreasonably large quarterly petty cash budget, so they brought on 2 contractors, including myself.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Docjowles posted:

Oregon AG: "Oracle sold the State of Oregon a lie."

Literally everyone else on earth: "...no poo poo. What the gently caress did you expect from Oracle?"

I would be VERY surprised if the truth is anything except "both sides are 100% full of poo poo and just trying to avoid spending money on the other"

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Food talk: Food is my primary hobby. I eat out for most of my meals, mostly at places I haven't been yet, though I don't snack and I don't eat a lot of meals, so I remain only slightly overweight

I haven't really kept track of my spending, but I'd guestimate $500-600/month just for me.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

at $job-1 the sales engineers had a salary with 80-90% of it guaranteed, and the remainder based on department sales numbers, rather than the sales numbers of projects you specifically worked on. If the department hit target, you made 100% of your salary. They also had an "accelerator" where if the department beat their goal you got 1.5x for the overage for the month. They also got paid a lot of money considering that most of them knew fuckall. Not a bad deal though - realistically even in a poo poo month the business unit would do 90% of their goal, so at worst you're taking home 98% of what you expected to, or whatever.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

hackedaccount posted:

Gonna ask here too: How do you guys keep up on cutting-edge'ish technologies? Not learning them, but just hearing about them. I got into OpenStack in early 2012 so it wasn't exactly ground floor but it was fairly early. Right now I'm getting into Mesos and evidently it's been around for several years, I had no idea.

Are there specific news sites that cover stuff like this? Certain people on Twitter? How do you guys hear about new up and coming open source projects?

A bit late, (which is apropos for the comment I'm about to make) but quite simply, I don't.

Cutting edge technology rarely matters for real life. I help keep ~12,000 instances running. I don't want cutting edge - I want stable and consistent.

Of the 500 "cool" technologies that get invented this year, 490 of them will be irrelevant and 9 of them will be superseded by a more refined product that does the same thing by next year or the year after. I don't have the time or energy to learn about 499 things that will ultimately never be widely deployed in production.

Learning about a software technology 2-3 years after it gets invented is, I think, ideal. Really, in 2011 who cared about Openstack besides Rackspace and HP? Nobody. If you didn't work at one of those companies it wasn't really an employable skill and it probably wouldn't have impacted your life.

The effort required to be on the absolute bleeding edge compared to the effort required to be inches behind it is astronomical.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Che Delilas posted:

I see this quite a bit from developers who use Git as their source control. I think what they really mean is, "Every GUI ever made for Git is such hot garbage that it's just faster and easier to learn all the console commands." But they don't want to say that, because otherwise Git is pretty great.

This was the impetus for me to get good at the AWS commandline and write a handful of tools to interact with the API - the console is awful, and gets progressively more awful if you have a lot of stuff.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Docjowles posted:

Have they fixed the S3 web console yet, or is it still completely unusable if you have more than a couple dozen objects stored? But yeah, I pretty quickly moved to doing poo poo via the CLI and tools like s3cmd.

Bit slow to respond.

I don't know if they fixed it since I just dove into AWS land 4 months ago, but I will say that I currently hate the s3 web console. Granted, we have an enormous number of objects - so many that the reporting feature in the billing panel crashes and fails to generate a usage report so AWS has to generate one for us manually and email it to us.

Edit for references chat:

All references prove is that you know 3 people willing to give you a verbal handjob. Granted, that's something, but it's sure not a lot. My current employer called my old boss and one of my coworkers (who sat on either side of me) while I was at work and I got to hear them jerk me off, it was pretty funny.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Accretionist posted:

Talking about money like that really is pretty awkward

CF/DAF is pretty awkward.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

jaegerx posted:

Just ask how traceroute works. If they know, then they understand networking

I don't really consider it critical, but it always surprises me how many candidates don't know this one, even at a fairly high level. Right up there with "How does your computer actually decide how to do a DNS lookup?" in terms of questions even experienced people frequently whiff. I've probably done 60 or so phone screens in the past year and definitely no more than three candiates said the word "nsswitch"

E: I get that nsswitch is a thing that generally works and mostly doesn't need to be customized, particularly in my line of work, (SRE) but it's still a strange gap.

Comradephate fucked around with this message at 23:14 on Mar 30, 2019

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice


my condolences

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Docjowles posted:

Kubernetes is cool and good, though

This is only true if you run orchestrators for fun and don't have any actual work to get done

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Umbreon posted:

I'm still trying to figure that out. I love networking a ton, but being a cloud engineer sounds extremely interesting. Are there any positions that would benefit from having both skillsets?

Pretty much any non-junior person doing cloudy poo poo has to have some understanding of networking, and everybody ideally would understand network security.

The quantity of work to be done on the networking front is low relative to owned hardware, but in AWS-land someone still has to define subnets, decide how to peer networks together, control security groups, and the like.

I'm on an SRE team of 12 people, and caring about networking is like, a part time thing for one person.

In general agreement with Judge Schnoopy—there is work to do, and the skillset is valuable, but it's going to be hard to find a job that only does networking.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

The trick is that it's impossible to get fired, so over time the most capable people will quit because superlative people do not want to work somewhere that rewards mediocrity.

But I mean, beyond that, it's probably fine. As you said, you've just worked at a ton of horrible places, and now you are working at a regular place.

Given that you've been there an entire year and you're still waiting for the other shoe to drop, I unironically suggest therapy. For me the honeymoon period of a job ends after 3 months or so. If you still think it's great to work there but are still worried it's secretly going to be a nightmare, talk to a pro about dealing with those feelings, because they are not normal feelings that everyone has to deal with.

E: also my first comment wasn’t just to be a dick and isn’t a direct judgement of you or your coworkers. What I was ineptly working towards was that for many people, that would be seen as the negative thing about the job. If it’s working for you, then it seems like you found a really good fit.

Comradephate fucked around with this message at 16:59 on Apr 8, 2019

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

The Fool posted:

I want Facebook to make a huge investment in the Mozilla Foundation so that the three big browser choices are Facebook, Google and Microsoft.

I would actually prefer this to the current world where there is effectively one browser choice, and it is created by the largest advertising firm in the world.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

Docjowles posted:

My hobby: putting the infosec director's username into the lovely fake phishing emails they periodically send out to catch people.

unless the campaign is run by a dummy, they use unique links and/or unique embedded images in the email to identify which emails were opened, so they'd see that the email sent to Docjowles resulted in credentials for not Docjowles being entered into the fake website.

Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

wait, what is his stated reason? that seems crazy.

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Comradephate
Feb 28, 2009



College Slice

175k + mediocre option grant + lovely health insurance + unlimited PTO, (I take at least a week a quarter off, plus miscellaneous individual days off)

Site reliability engineer at a mid-stage startup in NYC. If I don't get a promotion + substantial bump soon I am back on the interview grind, because one of my same-level peers makes 30k more than I do, among other issues.

Re: buying a house: even if we go public and I stay 4 years and our stock does reasonably well and I sell my entire grant I still won't be able to afford a 2 bedroom condo near work.

I'd still rather live here than most other places, though. If houses are cheap it's because nobody wants them.

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