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Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



adorai posted:

I do in fact regularly get contacted by ashit and venkatesan about opportunities for an sccm administrator or active directory admin with powershell experience in new York or LA. I am in Illinois.

I'm in Colorado and 90% of the LinkedIn contacts I get are for jobs in Silicon Valley. I don't really mind, they have no idea unless they ask that I have no interest in relocating and especially not to CA.

I do get annoyed when it's clearly for something I have no experience in, though. What part of 8 years doing sysadmin work makes you think I want or am qualified to be a Senior PHP Developer?

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Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Speaking of linkedin, I just got contacted about a job where my duties would be to "Administer Microsoft Servers running SQL Server 2000, Windows Server 2000/2003, Lotus Notes and Citrix Metaframe XP"

nope_nope_nope.gif

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



I do struggle with what I want the next steps in my career to be. Thinking 1,3 and 5 years out. I really love doing technical sysadmin work but I also don't really want to be in my 40's or 50's and still carrying the metaphorical pager. Even with a fairly deep rotation and stable-ish environment, being on-call blows. I don't want to do it forever. But neither do I want to go into pure management and stop getting my hands dirty, at least in the near to middle term. I need to identify the mythical "sysadmin that isn't on call" role.

Docjowles fucked around with this message at 17:56 on Jul 31, 2014

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



jaegerx posted:

Amen. I'm gonna be that 60 year old guy in the corner that smells of whiskey with an eye patch, old grey beard, and a nasa hat. Everyone is scared of me because I've seen poo poo. One day the poo poo will hit the fan and the CEO will say "call in old salty jaegerx" and god knows I will walk into that room with the stare of a 40 year veteran of the poo poo we have seen in IT and finally say "yeah I quit"

Just wanted to say this may be the best SH/SC post I have ever read

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



I've only ever worked at small companies (less than 200 employees) so it's been all x86 for me. The closest I've come to "big iron" was when I worked at an ISP and we outsourced our billing to CSG Systems. The back end obviously ran on a giant fuckoff ancient mainframe from the 60's and the admin interface was a lovely terminal emulator. I can't find a good screen shot of it online but it was the absolute worst interface to anything I've ever encountered.

Fiendish Dr. Wu posted:

But Vancouver looks like a freaking utopia compared to basically any place in the US.

Different question: what would be a great place to move to within the US wrt IT careers (that's not including NYC or Palo Alto)?

My wife and I have had similar fantasies about Canada / Europe, but she's also been talking about Seattle or Denver

It's not an insane hotbed the way NYC/SF are but the Denver/Boulder/Fort Collins area has a lot of tech jobs. And quality of life is pretty great.

Docjowles fucked around with this message at 17:00 on Aug 1, 2014

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



It's bad to be a serial job hopper. Leaving one or two in under a year over the course of, say, a decade shouldn't be a red flag though. If it's super entry level and you've grown out of it, or it was just an awful fit, I don't think any reasonable company would hold that against you. It's when you've had 4 jobs in 3 years and there's no clear upward trajectory that managers get nervous.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



psydude posted:

I've changed jobs twice in 3 years. In most cases the recruiter will just ask why I'm looking for a new position, so I explain that my current job filled the two positions I was holding while I was gone and wants me to do exchange upgrades at client sites, which isn't in line with where I'd like my career to go.

Tab8715 posted:

I haven't had a job that's lasted for more than a year in three years and the one before that was only two.

All of my jumps, not sure if I'm picking the right words - were career advancing.

I don't think these are really at odds with what I was saying. If the nature of your job changes and it's no longer even remotely the right fit for you (CCNP level neteng -> doing Exchange upgrades, lol) then sure, no one will question why you bailed. Or if you've plateaued in your current org with no chance of advancing which it sounds like might have been the case for Tab. The challenge is conveying that in your resume and cover letter so you don't just look like a flake or a washout. Obviously it's not a hard and fast rule; if you're a truly outstanding candidate in other ways, the company will call you back no matter what. It's just one more way you can stack the deck in your favor during the job hunt.

Also I'm only talking about FTE's. I've never contracted but I assume it's way, way more common to have a laundry list of 6-12 months stints in that world.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Oh god it's already suitchat time again?

FWIW I've never worked anywhere with a dress code above t-shirt and jeans. Including two software startups. Wore a suit to every interview. I got a bit of "lol nice suit nerd" from interviewers in shorts and sandals but was told that at the end of the day it was a positive and they felt it showed I was serious about getting the job. I feel like being underdressed is always riskier than being overdressed, even at a startup, but that's just my personal opinion. The 1% of brogrammer idiots that will toss you out for wearing a suit to a job interview are probably not someone you wanted as a boss anyway.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



My view boils down to the idea that wearing a suit will be at worst neutral and otherwise positive in 95% of companies. I admit to completely pulling that number out of my rear end, but would any of you seriously not hire an otherwise good candidate JUST because (s)he wore a suit? Assuming you own one to wear to weddings and whatnot anyway, it costs you literally nothing but a dry cleaning bill to bust it out for interviews.

I totally concede that "button down and slacks" is probably fine. But why not do everything you can to tip the odds in your favor? If it's a company that will seriously disqualify you for wearing a suit, it will probably be readily apparent. See the last thread where we talked about the interview that began with the COO shooting you in the dick with a nerf dart or whatever.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



GreenNight posted:

Do any of you have tips for working at a startup? Gf got interviewed at a local tech startup (they make custom search algorithms and just got a contract with TI) to be their mobile app designer, and neither of us are sure what questions to ask. The last thing she wants is for the company to be purchase by Google or something and then she is out of a job. She's already interviewed with the CEO, the lead engineer and next week talks to their one HR person, who will detail their offer sheet.

I'll preface this by saying I've worked at a couple startups, and I enjoy it. I don't mean to be bagging on them. That said, a couple things to keep in mind:

Startups are inherently unstable. How is her financial situation? Can she afford to be abruptly laid off at any time? Because the startup completely folding is honestly a much, much likelier outcome than Google buying them for billions of dollars. Obviously you can be laid off from any job, but a sudden cashflow problem or change of direction that makes her irrelevant are much more common in a startup.

Do not get suckered in by stock options in lieu of actual salary. Unless you're a founder or coming in as an executive you are probably being granted a trivial amount of stock. Then you're gambling on the extremely small chance that the company is bought or IPO's for a gigantic multiplier that makes your small amount of stock worth the years of lost salary. Sure, they might get "purchased by Google or something" but it's literally a million times more likely that the company either goes bankrupt or just continues chugging along, privately owned. Stock options are fine, but the offer should be "competitive salary, and also stock options". Not "half of a competitive salary, but wow, just look at all these <worthless> options!" For every Instragram or WhatsApp that wins the lottery, there's thousands that just fail and fade away. Most that do get bought are deals that won't make anyone but the primary investors a noticeable profit.

Getting bought by Google probably shouldn't even enter into her decision making process; it's not the likely outcome. She should weigh the job on whether the work sounds exciting, she likes her coworkers, and the company seems at least a little financially stable. In other words, the same reason you'd take any job.

Docjowles fucked around with this message at 17:17 on Aug 9, 2014

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



dogstile posted:

Pretty much this. If I move a server or a big UPS (some of those fuckers are so heavy and unwieldy) then I am getting someone to help me, i'm getting some form of trolley for it to go on and the person who's helping me lift has to at least have someBack injuries aren't worth it. The truck is self explanatory and I don't think its worth ruining a civics suspension for your company.

UPS batteries are the worst. One time we were moving some new UPS' into our server room and those fat fuckers broke the dolly we were using. The rest of that move was a ton of fun

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Drove (and actually still own, but it's relegated to running errands these days) a lovely late 90's Civic for many years. Daily driver is now a 2011 Hyundai Tucson SUV. It actually gets respectable mileage for an SUV, high 20's on the highway. Nice cargo capacity, AWD for lovely weather. The only thing I dislike is that it has blind spots the size of a tank. I can compensate for it by using the mirrors a lot more than I'm used to in other vehicles, but then my wife drives it and changes them and I'm all hosed up again for a while til I get them set back correctly

I moved a remarkable amount of servers and other misc crap between offices in that Civic, now that I think about it. Which was pretty retarded since there was a company van I could have used at any time.

Once the Tucson is paid off, I'd love to replace the Civic with something sportier and from the current millenium. One day... luckily none of my employers have ever asked or cared what I drive. Apparently I'd never get a job since I don't drive a BMW

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Swink posted:

Guys who listen to podcasts as they drive- any recommendations? Sysadmin focus?

I mostly work from home now thank God, but 1-2 days a week I have to drive to the office which is like 70 minutes each way in ideal conditions. So I have slowly been building up a list of sysadmin casts that aren't just the headlines from Ars Technica regurgitated. It grows and shrinks over time since most podcasts put out like 3 episodes and then fail. But these are the ones that are currently active to some extent. If anyone has more, post 'em!

Pure Tech Sperg Shows

Run As Radio - Entirely Microsoft focused so I end up deleting most episodes, but it's well produced and there's the odd topic that interests me so I still follow it.

The Ship Show - Panel discussions about build/release engineering, config management, light software development, general career advice.

DevOps Cafe - Really interesting interviews with people about, well, DevOps.

Arrested DevOps - Same

Ops All The Things - General sysadmin / operations topics. It's actually a good mix of Windows and *nix stuff.

Packet Pushers - Serious network chat. I actually unsubscribed from this one because I don't do much networking and it can get really, really far over my head. They have a couple other casts called The Network Break (formerly Coffee Break) and Healthy Paranoia (about security) that update less often but are approachable to non-neteng types.

The Class C Block - Similar to packet pushers. Very deep dives on networking that will probably bore you if you aren't in that world full-time.

Non-tech

Career Tools - General, non-IT specific career advice like how to interview, do resumes, ask for a raise, get promoted, etc. They also have some paid content but there's tons of free stuff. They do another podcast called Manager Tools, too.

Welcome To Night Vale - Owns, and one of the creators is a goon who used to write for the SA front page. I've heard it described as "A Prairie Home Companion, if mighty Cthulu lurked beneath Lake Wobegon". Just... give it a try.

Various ESPN fantasy football podcasts - self explanatory

The Brewing Network Sunday Session - Beer nerds talking about beer

Docjowles fucked around with this message at 15:36 on Aug 12, 2014

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Fiendish Dr. Wu posted:

I checked out a few of those but I think the reason I keep coming back to TWiT is for the production value. If I remember correctly, Packet Pushers was one dude with a thick accent breathing into the mix and not even trying to speak clearly.

Yeah, I hear you on that. I'd say about half of those have production values between acceptable and good, and the others are kind of awful. The ones that put out more than a handful of episodes generally improve, though, as they figure out what the gently caress they're doing or hire someone who does to produce the show.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Misogynist posted:

Our dev team just did theirs last night; didn't even ask me. Awesome feeling.

Our devs just send out an email saying "yo we're gonna deploy in a bit unless anyone says OH GOD JESUS NO". Ops never does say no unless we are fighting a giant outage, and in that case it's already probably our fault for not telling them about it so they'd know making a change is a bad idea. I'm not sure we even have the authority to say no, it's more of a courtesy. At the end of the day both groups report to the CTO and he'd resolve any theoretical massive dispute.

That's actually one of my favorite things about my workplace. The devs totally own deploys, and it's been that way for a while. We're not a DevOps "2000 deploys a day" utopia but we can deploy at any time, and routinely do so several times a week for both features and bug fixes. Devs also participate in on-call. Not as the first one to get paged but if it's determined that it's likely their stuff causing an outage, they get woken up too.

The obvious caveat is that we're a startup web company where it's not the end of the world if a deploy sucks because we ship format_c.exe by accident, and we're not handling bank accounts or HIPAA protected data. Usually we notice the error and resolve it quickly with a second deploy. But I've also worked at web companies where we deployed twice a year and ALL of dev and ops had to be in the office for 16 hours on a Sunday to deal with the awful fallout. It was The Phoenix Project loving verbatim and the complete polar opposite of Agile/DevOps/CI/CD. I am so, so glad the world is moving on from that.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Comradephate posted:

At any tech company whose primary presence is online (Facebook, Twitter, any startup with an app that is going to ~change the world~, mobile games, etc.) is going to have infra/ops be separate from IT.

This. "Ops" exists in companies providing a service that is large or complex enough that it gets its own dedicated system and network admins who don't have time to manage AD, printers, Exchange etc. Those folks are often called "internal IT" or "corporate IT" or something along those lines.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



hanyolo posted:

I think certs / experience are worth more than degrees for technical stuff, as what you learn in a degree gets outdated pretty quickly by new tech, but you need to refresh your cert(s) every 2 years (although these days it's so easy to braindump it, so I place little value on certs now as well).

This kind of got glossed over.

If you're investing 4 years of time and money in a bachelor's to learn how to configure a Cisco switch or administrate Active Directory or any other concrete "this is you use this specific piece of tech" skill, you're doing it wrong. Likewise, you don't get a BS in CS to learn to program in Java. You get it to learn algorithms and data structures and logic and math so that you can program well in any language your job may demand. As 5 other people have said, it's about learning fundamental principles which will still apply 30 years from now. As well as all of the soft skills. If you want to learn those specific, concrete skills then save yourself 3.8 years and a heap of money and just buy a CCNA study guide.

Certs aren't an alternative to a college degree, and vice versa. They're complimentary.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Forgot to say, congrats psydude! Hope it works out. And congrats on the launch, JeffMisogynist.

Casull posted:

I've been doing couch to 5k over the summer (as evidenced by me posting my progress in #bofh). I haven't lost any weight because I keep eating my favorite foods (rice) but I'm getting faster and I'm actually managing to run 5Ks all the way. Slowly, but surely.

This program owns for sure. I went through it maybe a year and a half ago and it does what it says on the tin, took my fat rear end from being able to run literally about 30 seconds at a time to running 5km several times a week. But then we had a kid, my free time and energy levels fell off a cliff, and I stopped. I need to pick it back up now that she's sleeping a little better and I have the energy to so much as stand up after work again

Fiendish Dr. Wu posted:

Hell yeah. Just had my first day (back) at the gym yesterday, and I can barely move my arms today. IT is great because you can be sore as gently caress and be able to spend your time recovering in a chair.

Actually also had my first day back at the gym in forever today (see above re: baby). Promptly hurt my thigh pretty good doing squats! Guess I was too lazy about stretching.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Anyone messing with Rundeck for orchestration? It's been in the back of my mind for ages but I finally had time to test it out this week. It's pretty slick. Especially once I found out that it has a SaltStack plugin, since we're using Salt extensively already.

GreenNight posted:

We had it easy - no public folders, no archiving and no pst files. Suck it, users.

More like lusers, amirite?

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Misogynist posted:

"Orchestration" is a term very loosely applied to Rundeck, since it's really not good at anything of the sort, but it's a great C&C console for repetitive tasks. We're using it all over the place and, yes, using the Chef plugin to provide node data into Rundeck directly from our Chef server. We're shifting more and more functionality into heavily customized middleware, though. Looking forward to trying out Consul and some other tools. We'll still likely use Rundeck to provide a nice quick interface to all the scripts that run our deploy processes.

Yeah, orchestration was a poor choice of words. I'm eyeing it for two main use cases: giving developers self-service access to a few things they ask Ops for constantly, and getting some visibility and consistency around how and how often our NOC people perform certain tasks. Both of which it seems super well suited for. For example, I said the other day our devs do all their own deploys. But if poo poo seriously goes south and they need to restart Tomcat or whatever, Ops has to do that. Once in a blue moon, they have a bad deploy when literally all of Ops is offsite at a team lunch or something and then we all get paged with HOLY poo poo RESTART TOMCAT NOW. I'd love to give them a button they can click to do that themselves.

So I guess my question is more organizational. Any resistance to allowing tasks like that to creep outside of Ops? And if so, how did you deal with it?

Also, sounds like the Chef plugins are nicer (no surprise, really). The Salt plugin lets you send job steps out through Salt instead of SSH, but I still had to write my own script to dump out node data for targeting the job. If I didn't hate Java with the fire of a million suns I'd consider writing such a plugin.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Flameingblack posted:

Another quick question, I need a way to crack Windows 8.0 passwords for people at this office who are constantly forgetting their windows passwords. Since I didn't set these computers up, none of them have the Admin account enabled for safe mode, I don't have any recovery discs, and there's no other way to reset these passwords I can think of since I'm not familiar with Windows 8 (Other than it's really stupid to use)

I've used this boot disk with great success in the past. I've never tried it personally on Windows 8+ but their website claims it still works. It doesn't "crack" the password but it lets you blank it out so you can log in and set a new one, which should be good enough.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



To me, the point is that it's so obvious yet people still don't do it, so it's still worth highlighting.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



whaam posted:

I don't see an enterprise networking thread just the home one so I'll ask here I guess.

The Cisco thread is kind of the de facto enterprise networking thread at this point.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Bob Morales posted:

That two year degree can be a foot in the door at a decent company for a decent wage, and you seem pretty motivated and knowledgeable already, so you should do just fine.

Or a means of knocking out a bunch of introductory poo poo on the cheap before transferring to a 4 year school to finish up a BS/BA. Community colleges are underrated, IMO. If you go that route you still wind up with the diploma from Big Name School and potentially save a ton of money.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



AutoArgus posted:

Had a client once that had a rule: Only vice presidents and above are allowed to have even potential access to customer data.

This was a gigantic multistate bank with hundreds of workers in its IT division. One building was basically a shopping mall full of VPs of telephony and network storage and poo poo. Vice presidents of helpdesk.

In a world full of gloriously stupid job titles, this might take the cake Amazing.

Sales organizations are great for this, too. Even the random high school intern is Chief Senior Executive Director of Interning because the more impressive-sounding qualifiers on your title, the more likely the poor sap you're cold calling is to take your call. At least I guess that must be the logic.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Oregon AG: "Oracle sold the State of Oregon a lie."

Literally everyone else on earth: "...no poo poo. What the gently caress did you expect from Oracle?"

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Comradephate posted:

Food talk: Food is my primary hobby.

Me too, except cooking it, not eating out I mean, I love to eat at restaurants, but it's expensive as gently caress and since I have no willpower I always end up ordering something incredibly unhealthy. I find cooking fun, relaxing, and a nice creative outlet after being down in the technical trenches all day. Same reason my other hobby is drinkingbrewing beer, it's fun to actually produce a physical good for a change. I don't have numbers handy but I'd guess my wife and I total ~$600 on food per month between us, counting one decent meal out a week. And we're not even very good about coupons, sales, buying in bulk etc.

Not really surprised by others' food budgets, though. Across multiple companies, I always seem to be the only guy in the office who brings his own lunch. Every day people go out and spend $10-15 on the one meal. Which brings just their lunch budget close to my entire monthly food spend. I don't care, buy whatever makes you happy. Just a trend I've noticed, no one cooks anymore.

Docjowles fucked around with this message at 19:59 on Sep 4, 2014

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



evol262 posted:

I have an identical twin, so +1 on cloning. Sadly, skill transfer through gene expression isn't 1:1. Ace DBA. No sysadmin or Linux skills, and visa versa

What I'm getting here is that you have a literal evil twin.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



NippleFloss posted:

Well, part of the appeal of the new position is that I will be doing both pre and post sales, so I won't have to worry about the all too common problem of pre-sales making impossible promises and post-sales getting blamed for failing to deliver them. There's a certain logic to being forced to eat your own dog food. A lot of companies, tend to split the two roles because it's tough to find people who have the soft skills required to handle the sales side of pre-sales and also the solid technical skills to do post-sales. It's much easier to just hire two different people with two different skill sets.

I'm sure it can vary, but does a pre-sales engineer typically work on a commission basis like "normal" sales? Or are you getting paid the same amount whether or not the deal gets closed?

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



CLAM DOWN posted:

I have a protip for all of you: don't let your users/clients/whatever run ColdFusion

Having supported a variety of CF apps in the past, I Am Down With This Post. It's like a singularity of terrible technologies, collapsing on itself into a black hole of suck. Adobe, Java, XML, ODBC...

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



If I put in a bunch of extra hours to meet a deadline or because on-call was a clusterfuck, it's a given that I can take a comp day off for that. My company is pretty cool.

Sadly that is not even remotely the norm in

CLAM DOWN posted:

How is that legal?!

It's explicitly called out in our labor laws that IT work is exempt from overtime pay, in fact!

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



CLAM DOWN posted:

Dude there is nothing else I can say to this, other than drat that's hosed up.

"Exempt" in this context means exempt from having to be compensated extra for working more than 40 hours per week.

U.S. Department of Labor
Wage and Hour Division
(Revised July 2008)
Fact Sheet #17A: Exemption for Executive, Administrative, Professional, Computer &
Outside Sales Employees Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

quote:

Computer Employee Exemption
To qualify for the computer employee exemption, the following tests must be met:
• The employee must be compensated either on a salary or fee basis (as defined in the regulations) at a
rate not less than $455 per week or, if compensated on an hourly basis, at a rate not less than $27.63 an
hour;
• The employee must be employed as a computer systems analyst, computer programmer, software
engineer or other similarly skilled worker in the computer field performing the duties described below;
• The employee’s primary duty must consist of:
1) The application of systems analysis techniques and procedures, including consulting with users, to
determine hardware, software or system functional specifications;
2) The design, development, documentation, analysis, creation, testing or modification of computer
systems or programs, including prototypes, based on and related to user or system design
specifications;
3) The design, documentation, testing, creation or modification of computer programs related to
machine operating systems; or
4) A combination of the aforementioned duties, the performance of which requires the same level of
skills.

http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/complia...7a_overview.pdf

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



luminalflux posted:

Whatever an elevator repair guy makes it doesn't involve printers at least.

Heh. We had to have a plumber out to our house on a Saturday recently to unclog the sewer line. Was mad about the huge "Saturday Visit Fee" line item on the bill til I remembered that whatever I may have to put up with, my job isn't LITERALLY "poo poo I come across daily".

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Ha. One of my best friends in high school had a calculator watch. It may have been literally the nerdiest thing ever and I was totally jealous

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



NZAmoeba posted:

In saying that, don't just say "This is dumb, do it this way instead". You need to ask WHY they are doing it that way? It could be a bad reason, such as "We did this due to a software bug for an application we no longer use, and then it was just habit", in which case your suggested improvement should be welcome. Or they could be doing a dumb thing for a very valid reason, such as "legal reasons" which in medical IT you'll probably come across a lot.

Heh. I've been at my current job for a year and change and I still run into this all the time. Find some really bizarre configuration that makes no sense. Email team, pray that there's either documentation or that the last person who understands it hasn't moved on. Maybe 1 in 10 times, the answer is simply "wow yeah that is dumb as hell, let's fix it". Much more commonly, there's a good but non-obvious reason. Or perhaps most often, "changing that will completely break W,X,Y and Z. We hate the way this is set up and you're welcome to fix it, but it will take you the next 6 months to untangle this incredible clusterfuck. Which is why no one has dared to do it. Go hog wild."

So yeah, I definitely agree. When you come across something that seems odd or wrong, especially when you're new, ask why it is that way. Don't just "fix" it. There's usually a reason and it's not always sheer incompetence

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Fiendish Dr. Wu posted:

Haha this guy is the best

I still can't tell if that guy is completely insane, or if they're an expertly done joke. Either way, they own. He's the Just Keep Tastin' of the PC repair world.

Sarcasmatron posted:

is now official: I start at Blizzard in 4 weeks.

Congrats Do you mind saying which type of position? I was eyeing the Linux admin jobs they had posted a month or two back as they sounded pretty drat awesome. But I'm not remotely in a place in my life to relocate to CA (family, house etc).

Docjowles fucked around with this message at 16:02 on Sep 13, 2014

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Tab8715 posted:

Is it always going to use a random port number for the incoming connection?

Yep. The term you want for these is ephemeral ports.

e: just realized that was already mentioned in a previous post

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



abigserve posted:

I use expect to manage our network of 800ish devices and I've never come across a problem that it couldn't solve.

What about the drinking problem you develop trying to write Expect scripts? The real sad part is that I agree, it's probably the best option.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



Goondolences to my fellow Linux admins. Meet "shellshock", the next hilariously bad exploit. Time to patch errything. I've been seeing hits in our server logs from drive-by scanning attempts but thankfully we're not exposing vulnerable services on public addresses. At least as far as what's publicly known to be vulnerable Still gonna patch.

And if you're super on top of it and have already patched, note: the current patch is incomplete. Certain variants of the attack are still possible, so there will be another forthcoming.

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Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



For those keeping score on Shellshock, a second, better (?) patch was released tonight. You want to be at this patch level... until yet more exploits are found

Red Hat / CentOS

Debian / Ubuntu

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