Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Nobody else posted a new thread yet so I did the needful. Content to follow.

What is this thread?
This thread is for day-to-day discussion about working in IT - career questions and advice, how to get started, how to get ahead , how to not gently caress yourself over, etc. are all welcome here in addition to the daily chit-chat. There are other threads in SH/SC covering specific IT topics like More poo poo that pisses you off and The IT Certification Megathread. It's fine to talk about those things here in a generic or career-oriented sense, but workplace-induced rage or specific questions about how to get your certs are better off in their respective threads.

What is IT?
IT in its most generic sense refers to the field of Information Technology.

Information Technology: (1) The study or use of systems (especially computers and telecommunications) for storing, retrieving, and sending information; (2) the technology involving the development, maintenance, and use of computer systems, software, and networks for the processing and distribution of data.

The IT field encompasses a wide array of roles and responsibilities, from help desk technicians to database administrators, and everything in between. Popular job titles in IT include:
  • Administrator
  • Architect
  • Analyst
  • Engineer
  • Technician
These titles are usually prefaced with some keyword like System, Network, Technical, Virtualization, etc. to specify a concentration or specialization. This list is in no way exhaustive and is in no particular order of importance. Any attempts to define exact parameters for an "IT job" usually fail miserably or devolve into a "true Scotsman" pissing match. IT is many things, and many things are IT.

What do IT people do?
Everything. An IT professional can be a generalist or jack-of-all-trades, meaning they learn a little about a lot of topics and solutions, and do pretty well for themselves. Others find success in specializing in a given product or solution, mastering the ins and outs and dedicating their entire career (or a portion thereof) to it.

I know how to computer. How do I get a job in IT?
This is a tough question to answer, hence we must generalize. IT isn't a very structured or well-organized field like Engineering or medicine where job titles and qualifications are overseen by a regulatory body. For 90% of you reading this thread, everything I'm about to say could be dead wrong.

Some people in IT start out at a help desk or some other entry-level user support team. These teams handle and resolve technology issues for users in an organization. They are typically the first line of support for end users and are often called "tier 1". The prerequisite for a help desk role is usually a decent understanding of computer hardware and software components, and the ability to learn quickly and think critically. From my own experience, working at a help desk gave me the opportunity to touch many different parts of the organization's IT infrastructure and get a feel for what interested me most. All organizations are different, however, and some help desks are more scripted or process-driven than others, so there may be less room for growth or professional development. Your mileage may vary. In any event, showing an interest in more advanced topics and demonstrating your ability to learn and master new things is a reasonably effective way of breaking out of the shitstorm that is the tier 1 help desk.

Others with existing knowledge or certifications in a particular technology can jump straight into an Administrator role. Whereas the help desk focuses more on user support, an Administrator role typically supports the systems themselves - applying patches, setting up or restoring backups, resolving issues escalated from the help desk, etc.

More advanced roles include Engineers, Architects, Analysts, and a whole slew of other possible titles. Engineers, Architects, and the like typically are more focused on implementing changes into existing systems or designing new systems altogether. Landing one of these positions usually requires a few years of experience, some of which could be substituted with a college degree. An Architect role tends to require 5+ years of specific experience with a given vendor solution, and usually a certification or two to go with it.

Certifications

BaseballPCHiker posted:

You're new to IT and you want to take some first steps towards advancing your career. Great, we have a certification megathread here that can answer most of your questions and give you some idea of what they cover and where they can lead to. But what I want to mention is that talk is cheap! I think a lot of new people make the mistake of planning out their entire career and what certs they will get in what order and spend all of their time on this instead of hitting the books and just working on what's in front of you. Decide on a cert and work on it! Don't let up until you're done and then take the time to plan your next step. The perfect plan is useless if you never put it in motion.

Resumes and Interviewing
I'll keep this short and IT-specific since BFC has an entire megathread dedicated to this. Resumes make the first impression on your prospective employer. Take your time and do it right.

When writing your resume for a job in IT, keep in mind that most companies are different. For the sake of the reader, keep organizational lingo out of it where possible. Also stick to highlighting things that you excelled at vs. just did. I don't care that you answered the phone when someone called. Use that bullet point and tell me briefly about an uncommon problem that you solved, or a process that you improved. Use hard numbers. Resist the urge to get artsy. If you're not in a creative field like graphics or web design, stick with conservative typefaces.

Tailor your resume to the job you're applying for. Pull keywords from the listing and use them in your resume where appropriate - don't just smatter them all over the page like alphabet soup. Don't puff up your resume thinking that it will help your chances. If you're not comfortable answering questions about some technology on the spot, don't put it on your resume. I would feel more comfortable hiring the guy who didn't know anything about Active Directory but was willing to learn than I would the guy who claimed to know but couldn't tell me the difference between a forest, tree, and domain.

Guidelines for interviews are fairly universal, but one of the main differences in IT is the dress code. For relaxed or casual companies, overdressing for an interview is possible. At some STARTUP CULTURE companies, it could put you out of the running entirely. At larger companies you'll be safe in a suit and tie. Smaller companies are a toss-up. Do your research on the organization, their geographic location, and their public image. If you have friends or acquaintances on the inside, ask them.

Resources
Many thanks to the countless goons who have contributed to the following threads for the benefit of all:

That's all I have time to write for now. If you'd like to add something to the OP, feel free to discuss it below.

48 14 0 DAYS POSTED WITHOUT A MELTDOWN.
GOOD POSTS ARE NO ACCIDENT! KEEP ARE FORUMS SAFE!

Cenodoxus fucked around with this message at 02:23 on Nov 29, 2014

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Japanese Dating Sim posted:

Alternatively, this thread could just be a continuation of the last one, which went swimmingly. I kind of thought this was assumed...

skipdogg posted:

It'll disintegrate into it sooner or later, so it's pretty pointless.

I take most new threads to be a continuation of the old, so

And nobody reads the OP anyway

DrAlexanderTobacco posted:

Might as well start this off with some bragging!

Got a new job. £5k raise, mostly the same sort of stuff I'm doing now. Not exactly the upward movement I was looking for, but my old company was acquired recently and they're shifting direction a tad.

I was asked in the interview if I had any experience with Linux servers. I said no, but I at least know not to run rm -rf * - which got a few laughs, and I got to feel all

Nicely done! Was Linux part of the job listing or did they throw that question in for their own curiosity?

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

BaseballPCHiker posted:

I have one suggestion for the OP as this comes up constantly.

Well put, I've added that to the OP.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

orange sky posted:

So, in my country most of the market is Windows Server, but I seem to find that the big bucks and high responsibility jobs as a sysadmin involve Linux (not always true, I realize that, but I wanna learn anyway). That's as good a reason as any to look into it, in my personal time. What do you guys suggest I read about being a Linux admin? I have no idea about anything related to it (what is used instead of AD, and OU's, and WDS, and whatever else I know about Windows Server).

Fortunately AD is built around LDAP, which is usually the directory service of choice on Linux, so if you've got AD down you can probably change gears to LDAP with a little extra studying.

As far as learning Linux itself, if you need to start with basic knowledge you could start out at The Linux Documentation Project and their System Administration Guide.

Most enterprises use Red Hat Enterprise Linux or a free variant like CentOS. Red Hat maintains a lot of high-quality documentation on their website, so if you're looking for free resources I would suggest starting there. If you're willing to drop money on it, there are plenty of books on RHEL but most of them are aimed at people studying for a Red Hat certification like RHCSA or RHCE.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

MC Fruit Stripe posted:

I'm not one of those people who farts because ha ha farting is funny - I'm 32, come on bro.

That said, losing track of mute-unmute-mute-unmute-mute-unmute on a conference call and letting one fly, only to then realize that you're unmuted, oh thank god IT is a man's world, otherwise I might have to feel shame.

Please tell me it was a WebEx/LiveMeeting and you got the little speaker icon next to your name.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

psydude posted:

Quick informal survey: how many of you work for companies that do 100% tuition reimbursement? I'm not talking $5000 in tuition assistance, I'm talking the entire degree paid for.

$5000/year, paid on completion of course, 100%/75% payout for As/Bs respectively, and 2 years continued employment required after each payout.

I ran the numbers and figured that my alma mater is cheap enough to where I could get a fully paid-for MBA in 5-6 years. I'm just not sure if I want to shoot myself in the foot this early.

Aunt Beth posted:

I'd love to know what system this is. Computing history is fascinating to me, the mainframe is a huge part of that, and a huge reason why I now work where I do.

I geek out watching videos about System z and trying (read: failing) to do even the simplest of tasks in Hercules. I've always found exotic poo poo like Irix, AS/400, and z/OS to be intriguing, but Irix is the only thing I was ever able to get my hands on.

Cenodoxus fucked around with this message at 17:45 on Aug 1, 2014

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

CLAM DOWN posted:

Yeah, the bit I've done on it, it's basically just a standard BSD-like OS. The hardware though, holy loving hell.

Back when I didn't care about my utility bills I had an O2, an Octane, and a Fuel, and fantasized about owning an Origin rack. They were loud and power-hungry by today's standards, but holy hell indeed. The hardware was gorgeous.

And yeah, it was fairly standard from a UNIX perspective, but the graphics capabilities and hardware made it special. Fortunately there's still a small community developing/porting for it, otherwise you would find a lot more of them in the dumpster than you already do today.

Aunt Beth posted:

MVS is not dead at all; it's continued evolving but OS/360 MVT=MVS=OS/390=z/OS. You can trot out a COBOL program that was written for System/370 in 1975 and run it on a z/OS LPAR you installed on a zEC12 last week with no modification. It's a very tricky OS to run because it has basically no architectural similarities to anything else currently in use today, as well as a lot of complexity to maintain full backwards compatibility. UNIX system services are available that provide a POSIX-compatible interface to the OS, but it's not terribly widely used in my experience.
I'm hearing a lot of mixed signals about how "the mainframe is back" and "the mainframe is dead". What has your experience been career-wise with it? How did you get your start working on mainframes? I think it'd be neat to get some exposure to them but it seems the only way in is through IBM these days.

Cenodoxus fucked around with this message at 18:57 on Aug 1, 2014

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Alfajor posted:

Since those are severely different, I think the easiest way to explain it to a Dr is to put it in dollars. I figured that a mbps/$ ratio explanation would paint the picture, so considering just the downstream speeds:
- HughesNet is $8 mbps/$
- U-Verse is $4.44 mbps/$
A Mbps ratio would only confuse them more. The easiest way to explain it to a doctor in this case is "AT&T is faster and cheaper, and doesn't shouldn't cut out when it rains. But it may slow down if you live farther from their office."

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

NippleFloss posted:

Would you suggest that a woman should wear a formal dress to an interview? If not, then why not?
I would not, because they make suits for women.

To a point you're correct that looking presentable is a big part of it, but a big component of your presentation in an interview is looking professional, and a great majority of society views suits as very acceptable professional attire. It stands to reason that a company that views slacks and a shirt as acceptable interview attire would view a suit as being just as acceptable, if not more. So why not play it safe and just go for the suit? In case you forgot, you're competing against other candidates, some of whom probably wore a suit.

The venn diagram of "Companies I want to work for" and "Companies who won't hire me because I wore a suit to the interview" doesn't overlap.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

GreenNight posted:

Sitting in the doctors office. I like how all their computers are windows xp.

Welcome to healthcare IT. It's not just your doctor's office.

XP, WS2K3, Office 2003, these are all still a thing in a lot of healthcare facilities. Marvel at that for a bit, and then sob quietly if you have to work with any of it.

Cenodoxus fucked around with this message at 18:11 on Aug 12, 2014

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Alfajor posted:

I work in HealthIT and we do have a few older systems that we have floating around because they're used for reference. If they were used to conduct business, I would flat out refuse to keep them alive.
Yeah, I've come across a few systems like that. I had a client who changed EHRs from HNA Classic running on OpenVMS to something else. They kept their VMS cluster running for a few years as a reference - then one day, the last person who knew how to use it retired and they finally gave us the green light to shut it down.

That was the first time I had ever touched OpenVMS. What a mindfuck coming from Linux.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

In lieu of formal training, why don't you just send out some suspicious-looking honeypot emails every once in a while, but instead of a malicious .exe attached to it, you attach a Powershell script that sets their speakers to full volume and opens up one of those gag "HEY EVERYONE, I'M LOOKING AT GRANNY PORN" flash pages?

They'll catch on after a few incidents.

Maybe.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

If you're going to give your current employer any ultimatums, make sure your credit card has been paid off first and for the love of God don't buy anything for them after that, because they honestly might try to gently caress you over.

I would also say never use your personal card for your employer's purchases in the first place but I guess we crossed that bridge a long time ago.

Thanks Ants posted:

You do the work of two people for the price of one without complaint, and could be replaced by a corporate credit card. Why do you think you're in a position of leverage?

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Tab8715 posted:

Does anyone work with any document imaging products? Square 9, iDatix, FileBound...

Holy hell, I need a new job

We use Kofax and EMC ApplicationXtender.

They're okay, I guess.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Tab8715 posted:

Quick networking question,

I am a little confused how TCP/UDP Ports work. I understand that TCP is "smart" and UDP is "dumb" but I don't understand when it comes to inbound/outbound and the randomly generated port number.

For example, if I have a host computer that attempts to access a server across a separate network. It will use a specific port for the outbound and always(?) randomly generated number for inbound. Is this accurate?...

Basically, you could theoretically have a web server (port 80) on a network that could be reachable via the internet and locally but you could block your users from accessing any HTTP resources outside of the WAN by blocking 80.

Am I getting this?

That's correct.

When Client A attempts a connection to Server Z on port 80, the client will use an ephemeral port for its source, which is temporarily assigned to that particular connection. The destination will always be the well-known port for the service on Z. These ports usually come from the standard range of 49152 to 65535, but it differs with each implementation of the TCP/IP stack.

Then when Z responds, everything gets flipped. The well-known port is the source and the ephemeral port of the client is the destination.

Also yes, blocking destination port 80 leaving your network will prevent users from hitting outside HTTP sites, while still leaving your firewall open to allow destination port 80 packets coming into your network and source port 80 packets leaving.

Cenodoxus fucked around with this message at 15:20 on Sep 16, 2014

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

SH/SC is my main source. Goons are a well out of which much useful information can be pumped. I also trawl other places like TechCrunch, Ars, AnandTech, etc. every so often. Pulse on my iPad is pretty awesome for aggregating everything.

Is it just me, or has Ars gotten too grandiose and over-the-top in their coverage of some things? Some days I open up Ars and I see riveting accounts of hacker tales with the flair of a Spanish soap opera, other days I load it up and get hit in the face with 8 articles discussing advanced physics on a postgrad level.

AnandTech is a lot more well-balanced... if only they would on a regular basis.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Inspector_666 posted:

I tried using it, but apparently I have to guess correctly 100 times in a row to see my own estimate, which seems dumb since if I knew what a title was worth I wouldn't be on the site to begin with.

Plus you can apparently go into negative points?!

You get a varying number of points based on how close you are to the current estimate. It took me about 15-20 appraisals before I hit 100 and my appraisal results usually varied wildly from the established estimate.

My beef with SalaryFairy is that it's stupidly inaccurate and doesn't factor in your location. Case in point, it told me I should be making $96k which is ridiculous for my area and level of experience. I'm two years out of college, have a CCNA, and live in Missouri. If I walked into every interview asking for $96k, I'd be perpetually seeking employment.

When I was trying to build up to 100 points, I lost 30 on one single appraisal. This person is currently a freshman in college, had 1-2 intern positions and one developer gig, then out of nowhere became a "CEO" or something. SalaryFairy pegged him at $100k+.

So...

ZetsurinPower posted:

Does anyone use SalaryFairy? I feel like the salary estimates are a bit inflated
I'd call it "wildly optimistic".

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Tab8715 posted:

Also, what's with puTTy and pasting into the terminal? Sometimes, if you have a bunch of text in your buffer, accidentally click in the puTTy terminal window it'll paste everything and even enter that input. I'm suspecting it's taking a new-line as enter? Is there a way to avoid this?

I once accidentally pasted a bunch of input into script during production. It broke a ton of stuff and it took me days to figure out

Yeah, right-click = paste and new lines = enter. Recipe for prod disaster.

Somewhere in the PuTTY settings window you can change the default right-click action from "Paste" to "Open menu".

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

CLAM DOWN posted:

News says 5000 jobs cut, not 50000, there's a typo somewhere!

http://online.wsj.com/articles/hewl...nies-1412592132

quote:

Separately, H-P also boosted Monday the number of expected layoffs it has planned by 5,000 to 55,000, after identifying “incremental opportunities for reductions.” H-P had previously projected its job cuts to be between 45,000 and 50,000, and it already has shed 36,000 employees under the restructuring program as of the end of the most recent quarter.
incremental as if that makes it sound better.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Sepist posted:

Yikes, my boss asked me to make a website for ordering dunkin donuts because we go so often with such a high volume of people. 2 hours configuring the html5 app + php pages to make mysql calls. Weird.



Wow, do you write code for a living or did some rear end in a top hat say "Hey, pen and paper is hard, and Sepist knows computers, so..."?

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Che Delilas posted:

I don't know, I just feel like there are a plethora of words you can use as placeholders that don't relegate people to the level of interchangeable cogs. Professional, expert, or a generic term for a person who would fit a particular job (developer, network admin, tech, etc.), it's not like it takes any effort for you to use one of those terms instead. Hell, calling the people you send to your clients "experts" instead of "resources" might make your clients see them as more valuable on a subconscious level, which can't be bad for your business.

I don't mind being called a resource in a complimentary or non-condescending manner. But I hate when people overuse the word "engage". Every time someone uses that word when they say they're going to "engage" someone to fix something, I imagine them flipping a switch on some giant machine that sucks up problems and shits out a solution.

It's a great word to use when you want to sound like you're contributing, when in actuality you're just asking someone else to do it.

owDAWG posted:

We should take bets on when he burns out from thinking about IT 24/7.

When do his meds expire?

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

CLAM DOWN posted:

Hey Grouchio
Whatchu gonna do
Whatchu gonna do
Make your C: internet accessible

Time for a new thread:

file:///C:/xampp/htdocs/forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3653857

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

spiny posted:

genuine question: how would that help ?

At the moment, in our own office we have the setup shown in the picture, a 'main' network, and two 'demo' networks. It works fine, but there is no QoS / throttling in place, so lots of use on one network impacts on the others, which I wouldn't want happening at the business center.

Stick your own router between the internet and your distribution switch and you can run QoS on that.

How many rooms do you have? How many hosts in each room? Does each tenant need a public-facing IP? Do they need to provide and manage their own router? (Gaping security hole if tenants are all on the same layer 2 network)

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

spiny posted:

I don't know enough about layer2/3 stuff to know why this is a bad thing ?

if each router has a firewall and a separate IP, then surely they won't be able to see devices on other networks ?

You should hire a consultant or a full-time network engineer to head up this project. Plugging everyone into a shared switch and telling them to set things up on their own is a terrible idea.

Long story short, having multiple clients on one layer 2 domain each with their own router allows them to interfere with the connection of another client. This could be something as innocent as accidentally configuring the wrong IP address on their router, or something malicious like ARP spoofing where they purposefully impersonate someone else to try to steal their data.

The answer to the layer 2 security issue is to set up a Private VLAN so that client A in room 12 can talk to your router, but can't talk to other clients in any other rooms.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Zero VGS posted:

I've got a friend of mine coming in to interview for a help desk job today. He's a goon and has a CS degree and hasn't had a legit job in the 8 years he's been out of college so I'm starting him at $12/hour lol

The real question is, where does he post most of the time?

SH/SC = Underpaid
GBS = Eh
PYF = Fair enough
D&D = Sounds OK to me
FYAD/YOSPOS = Wait, he went to college?

e: Can't forget about YOSPOS.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Bob Morales posted:

I worked at a place where they literally didn't know how to 'upload files' to a server and only emailed poo poo back and forth

Hi Bob I think one of the files on the server is broken I can't open it can you please help I have a meeting in 5 minutes the file name is
RE: RE: RE: FWD: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: RE: FWD: FWD: RE: Meeting Minutes (Updated) (FINAL) (Additional Notes) Followup (1).doc
thanks

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Roargasm posted:

So what's the plan to monetize? Tumblrites don't tend to have credit cards

Accept payment in fedoras, velcro-on tails and internet points. It's marginally more stable than bitcoin.

evol262 posted:

Suse is like Redhat in the sense that they're both RPM-based and both Linux. Not that similar otherwise.
Isn't SUSE pretty big in HPC? I seem to recall SLES being the OS of choice for SGI. I'm not sure if that's the case for any other vendors though.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

jaegerx posted:

e: can we also do a countdown in the OP of how many days it goes without a dilbert as gently caress breakdown. I'd like to start tracking the data.
I'll see what I can do.

Drunk Orc posted:

I'm wondering if this is a lack of common sense when it comes to dressing or an over abundance of confidence?
Yes.

Misogynist posted:

Despite all the lip service from their HR analytics drones about the optimum number of interviews, someone who's gone through it recently told me it still takes months to get hired.
Do they still do those creative problem solving questions?

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Zero VGS posted:

I am taking quotes from local Cisco techs and I have a resume that says "CCNA, CCNP, CCIE (passed written exam)". That just means he never took or didn't pass the CCIE lab?

Maybe, maybe not. They could have just recently passed the written and are waiting to take the lab, which is understandable since you have to travel for it. Ask for clarification before you make any decisions from it.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Cenodoxus posted:

48 14 0 DAYS POSTED WITHOUT A MELTDOWN.
GOOD POSTS ARE NO ACCIDENT! KEEP ARE FORUMS SAFE!

Welp.

Chickenwalker posted:

I'm working as a catch-all post-production support guy. We maintain all the edits, media servers, A/V equipment, client PCs and keep the network going. I work 60 hours a week and get paid less than $40k a year. How badly am I being screwed?

At best, totally screwed. At worst, getting rammed bone-dry with no safe word by a partner with a cigar-burn fetish. As a sweeping generalization I'd say if your NYC-based employer is paying you less than $40K for your NYC-based system/network/storage tech role, your only hope for getting a sane wage is to jump ship.

Getting some certs and using that to negotiate a raise is a good idea in theory, but no matter what you tell them you'll just end up negotiating from an $11/hr base.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

ratbert90 posted:

What would be the best way to transfer a server from old hard drives to new fancy ones?

Old is SATA 500Gig drives connected to a Dell Poweredge R620 in a RAID10 setup.

The drives are being replaced with SAS 1TB drives. I would like to make this as painless as possible.

Normally I'd say swap them out disk-by-disk but you can't expand a RAID10 with PERC. You need to stand up a new array, which if you have all bays occupied means you'll be dd'ing off to temporary storage and dd'ing it back.

RFC2324 posted:

Isn't LVM really good for painlessly migrating data? Just add new drives, tell LVM to move the data, then remove the old drives?

Not if you're booting from the array that needs replacing. While it's possible that they have a separate array for the boot data, it's more likely that they've partitioned the RAID10 into a boot partition and an LVM PV. Doing that with minimal downtime would require having enough drive bays open to stand up the new array alongside and dd over your boot sector and boot partition, followed by rebooting onto the new array, then making a new PV and migrating the VG onto it. You might get hosed by your bootloader or fstab though for having duplicate UUIDs on your old and new boot partition depending on how it's being referenced.

IMO you're better off dd'ing the entire RAID10 onto temporary storage, pulling the old drives, making a new array and dumping the image back onto it. If it's Windows then this is the only option short of a reinstall. If the copy gets hosed up, stick the old drives back in and you're back to square one.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

ratbert90 posted:

It's running CentOS7. I might have to just take down the server and do a dd on the drives one by one?

edit*

I like the idea of DD'ing each drive to a remote mount, so long as I shut down all services on the server first that should work great!

Don't dd a mounted filesystem. Boot to a live CD and do it from there.

Doing a dd on a live system makes me uneasy - Lord knows what could be going on in the background, changing some important thing right after dd has copied it off.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

Personally I think most certs are dumb and would rather just require my candidates to take an assessment test.

Why are certifications dumb and an assessment test for applicants isn't?

Businesses wanting certs for stupid reasons is not an indictment of the concept of vendor certifications. The real issue is lovely hiring practices where a hiring manager ejaculates acronyms all over a job posting in hopes that they'll A) find a unicorn or B) be "unable to find qualified applicants" to justify an H1B.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

"So as I detailed on my resume, in my last position I was the lead architect for our enterprise-wide VMAX storage refresh proj-"

"What is the maximum length of a SATA cable?"

"Eh- ...excuse me? Well, 1 meter, but I don't see how that's rel-"

"Correct. What is the maximum number of devices allowed on a single Ultra2 bus?"

"...When was this test writ-"

"WHAT IS THE MAXIMUM NUMBER OF DEVICES ALLOWED ON A SINGLE ULTRA2 BUS?"

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

22 Eargesplitten posted:

One thing I've never been sure of but am probably overthinking because it's not 1900 anymore. Is it rude to accept a water / coffee at an interview if it's offered?

No. If anything, accepting would actually help because you've got something to sip to keep your throat and mouth from drying out, or to stall for time while you think through your response. Comedians, public speakers and panelists always have a glass of water on hand for the same reasons.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

nitrogen posted:

Seriously. Medical Billing is basically, "Whatever we can get away with."

Not for long. CMS has been retooling its payment structures and phasing in a value-based payment model for Medicare/Medicaid claims, which make up a hefty majority of most hospitals' revenue streams.

The end goal of the payment model shift is that providers stop getting paid for "what did you do to this patient" and start getting paid for "what did you actually fix" and "are you doing things to keep population you serve healthy".

GreenNight posted:

My question is why do MRI machines still cost so much? Because they can? I'd think the tech would get cheaper as time goes on.

MRI machines come in different sizes and strengths so cost really depends on how much resolution is needed. There are low-strength MRIs in the sub-1-Tesla range that are on the cheap end of the spectrum and super-high-powered machines on the upper end (9-10 T) that are in the multi-millions for just the machine itself.

Sometimes the room it's in costs just as much as the machine for a few reasons. MRIs are giant superconducting magnets, so they have to be supercooled by liquid helium around the clock. Shutting one down temporarily is more expensive and potentially dangerous than leaving it on 24x7. The magnetic field of an MRI is so strong that the entire imaging suite has to be carefully engineered around the device for safety so you don't turn the furniture into projectiles. YouTube has a lot of entertaining and frightening results for "MRI projectile". On a sadder note, in the early 2000's a child's head got crushed by a flying oxygen tank during an MRI procedure. A lot of money has to go into carefully controlling both the device and its surroundings.

Only a handful of companies make MRIs due to how complicated they are. They require so much engineering and oversight that some Silicon Valley startup couldn't just come in and "disrupt" the medical imaging industry like they do fitness trackers and light bulbs and WiFi toilets. They'd have to have hundreds of millions of real dollars (not VC valuation Monopoly money bullshit) to put toward R&D to make a real dent in anything and not get sued into oblivion if their machine either didn't work or gave bad results. (Theranos 2: Electric Boogaloo)

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Coredump posted:

Everyone start buying helium balloon tanks and storing them.

It is the year 2030. The world's helium supply has been severely depleted by overpopulation and an explosive rise in children's birthday parties. Electric cars have made fossil fuels obsolete. Petroleum is considered drilling waste and is pumped straight into the Gulf of Mexico. Gas harvesters are buying up massive tracts of land in the now defunct oil fields of Texas in search of helium deposits.

In this dystopian hell where Texas is somehow once again relevant in the global economy, one man must fight to save his homestead from ruthless squeaky-voiced helium barons.

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

Thanks Ants posted:

I don't really understand the need to print stuff anyway. I probably print less than 10 pages a month and half of that is because the ultra-modern process of completing expenses claims online hasn't yet reached us, so printed receipts and a signed Excel sheet it is!

Printing in healthcare IT is a mixed bag. Some of it is out of necessity and some is just mind-bogglingly wasteful. At some point your patient is going to leave and you'll need to hand them a 10+ page discharge packet with contact info, care instructions, follow-up appointments, etc. Patient portals are great for some of that stuff but it assumes a certain level of understanding and access to technology that is unfortunately not ubiquitous.

If you're printing off Excel spreadsheets to show to Janice in Accounting who, like you, has a computer and an email address, then you are literally the worst person.

I work with people every day whose preferred workflow for "send me a screenshot" involves hitting print screen, paste to Paint, print to paper (in grayscale of course, ink doesn't grow on trees), scan it to their email address as a PDF or JPEG, then email it to me.

e:
And on a similar note, Quest Diagnostics, a not-at-all-small national lab chain, recently had trouble processing my claim with Cigna, a not-at-all-small global insurance provider, because they were mailing the claim forms to the wrong address.

Mailing. paper forms. wrong address. TYOOL 20 loving 16.

Cenodoxus fucked around with this message at 20:59 on May 21, 2016

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

SSH IT ZOMBIE posted:

Is any of that illegal? Or just a dick move?

Colossal dick move, but not illegal.

If I were the vendor I'd tell said director to go gently caress themselves with an ornamented flagpole.

And that's why I'll never work in sales.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Cenodoxus
Mar 29, 2012

while [[ true ]] ; do
    pour()
done

adorai posted:

I think he is referring to welfare benefits.

Vulture Culture posted:

A lot of government benefits are determined based on your income bracket. For example, a small raise may bump you above 400% of the federal poverty level so you no longer qualify for ACA insurance subsidies.

There are other losses and downsides aside from just those on welfare and benefit programs. Tax deductions, exemptions and credits sometimes have an income cap and a pretty steep phase-out structure, and the way the IRS sets their phase-outs is loving stupid.

Example:
For single filers with an adjusted gross income of $20,001 to $30,750, the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit refunds you 10% of your total retirement contributions (401k/IRA) for the year up to a maximum of $2000. That's a $200 credit on your refund. If you were at $30,750 and took full advantage of the credit in 2015, but had a wildly successful year and your AGI skyrockets to $30,751 for 2016, you are no longer eligible for the credit and will pay $200 more on your tax bill for having earned an extra dollar.

Granted, I've never heard of someone getting a $1 raise, but multiply that effect across a lot of other deductions and credits and it can quickly add up. I think that's what most people are talking about when they say "I got a raise and lost money".

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply