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Gort
Aug 18, 2003


Your employees are a precious resource.

Exploit them.

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Gort
Aug 18, 2003


Yeah, where I work the sys-admins are the only ones with SSDs, except for the guys who bring their own devices. Surprise surprise, when you're the ones in charge of who gets what machine, you tend to get the good stuff when people leave.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


ChubbyThePhat posted:

Yes there is actually a decent amount of stuff in there. The times I've used it have been good.

I currently use it as part of my pool of resources for training my L1 techs.

Which courses d'you use?

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


George H.W. stinkyhole posted:

I fully believe that 100% of humanity takes for granted the feeling of not being sick. Trying to work from home as I succumb to a head cold and Iím just a massive miserable grump who just wants to die.

Take the day off sick, you dummy. That's what sick leave is for.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


J posted:

My employer recently purchased a small company that I will call company B. B handled email and file sharing with G suite, whereas we're a mostly microsoft environment (AD, exchange, etc.) At this point we've mostly got B integrated into our domain. However, there is a lot of gnashing of teeth from B about how they just haaaate outlook and gmail is just so much better and they just can't do anything without gmail. This is my first experience with G Suite so I'm a rookie here but so far from what I've seen, while we can get their exchange mail delivered to the g suite account, the idea was to ditch the g suite account altogether. Management doesn't want to keep paying for it, and ultimately I think they are going to tell company B to get over it. However they are still asking if B can somehow "keep gmail." I'm not overlooking something here am I? To me it seems like the options are either keep paying for g suite, or we drop g suite and B gets to live with outlook. We have on prem exchange if that matters.

Nah, you're not overlooking anything - they gotta pay for GSuite or lose it.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


Anyone got any recommendations for application performance monitoring software? Currently we use NewRelic but apparently that's too expensive now.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


Antigravitas posted:

I'm freeeeeeeeeeeeeee.

Naturally, a few hours before going on vacation there was a flurry of new tickets which I promptly bumped a month down the road.

They'll all still be there when you get back, just one month angrier

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


If a third of the availability zones in AWS London could stop loving up on a daily basis that would be cool

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


CLAM DOWN posted:

What. You can't file your own taxes for free in the US?

It blew my mind when I found out everyone in the US had to file their taxes every year like they're running a business or something. Over here in the UK you just get an amount deducted from your paycheque each month and you don't have to do anything. It's mostly the responsibility of the finance department of the organisation you work for.

The US system just seems the worst of all worlds, no wonder people over there get so mad about taxes. Like how labels on products don't actually reflect the amount you pay at the till since they don't include state sales taxes, so you have to manually add that on in your head.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


quote:

Nobody gets mad about that. You'd have to label things differently for every municipality since you can have state, county, and city sales taxes.

...so? The shop knows what things cost so they can charge you the after-tax amount at the till, after all.

My "no wonder people get mad about taxes" comment was because the labelling system draws attention to the taxes by not including it on the label. In the UK a product might cost £4.50, so it's labelled as £4.50 and you pay £4.50. In Minnesota, a product might be labelled as $4.50, but when you get to the till you have to pay $4.50 plus sales tax, so it's actually $4.81, which draws attention to the taxes. If the same product was labelled as costing $3.00 but you then had to pay a 50% transportation charge on top of that, people would get mad about transportation charges. As it is that's just baked into the labelled price, so it's invisible to the customer, so they don't think about it nearly as much as the tax charge.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


"Price labels should be accurate"

"lol just be rich and you won't care"

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


I would say, "At least we don't have to live under Trump" but we kinda do

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


So, I work for a company that has a bunch of web servers on AWS. We spin them up when they're needed from an Amazon Machine Image which has the Operating System, PHP, web server and database software installed, then we do about half an hour's work on AWS and on the server to do stuff like assign them an IP address, set hostnames, create uniquely-named databases, give them unique passwords and put them in our password management system and so on.

Higher ups are looking at automating the above process, and our devs have mentioned using Docker to streamline it - ideally getting to the point where you just fill in a web form and then everything above takes care of itself in a matter of minutes. I'm not exactly sure what Docker brings to the table, though, not having used Docker, and the devs - looking to use this project to learn Docker - don't really seem to know either.

I kinda get that Docker has recipes, so we could use it to create web servers, but that's pretty much what we already do with the Amazon Machine Image, right? Anything unique to that server would still require us to go in and specify it, or we could script it, but that wouldn't be any easier than scripting it on the system we've already got.

Is there some great benefit to using Docker to create web servers that I'm missing, here?

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


captaingimpy posted:

How is it decided when you need new servers? Is it load/performance based, or is it something like you need to setup a new customer? Is the DB software an actual database or is it something like a connector?

I'd look at CloudFormation, Ansible, Terraform, or Jenkins utilizing some or all of previously mentioned tools if you want a mash button make magic happen webpage before going down the docker route, especially if no one has experience in it.

Also, you typically don't want to do something that requires you to touch a docker container after it has been spun up. They're meant to be treated like cattle. Docker can do some really great things, but it can be a real PITA at times. For example, logging can be painful to manage, especially if the apps don't already have a good logging mechanism in place. I've also had a docker container come up in a dev environment that set off our A/V-Malware tool. Come to find out a developer grabbed a random docker image from a random registry that was loaded with all kinds of goodies. It was good that that happened though, because it allowed us to put a process in place for docker images and moving them through the different environments.

All of that to say, Docker is a great tool when used correctly and that I'd take some time to figure out if it's the right tool in your situation.

New servers are spun up for new customers, for the most part. A few big customers have autoscaling, but the vast majority just have an AWS instance that's their own. The DB software runs on that instance along with the web server. For the most part these are fairly small servers, 2-4 GB RAM dealies.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


Anyone know a good way to log what's using memory on a Windows server? Like if a server hit 100% memory utilisation last Tuesday, I could check the logs and see that 80% of the RAM was taken up by MySQL or whatever.

I know there are solutions like NewRelic which are good if you want to monitor a bunch of servers, but this user only runs a single server and doesn't want to pay money. I was looking at Windows Performance Monitor but I don't think there's a way to make it log RAM usage by process.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


Collateral Damage posted:

PerfMon? Maybe not the most powerful, but it's right there.

I didn't see a way to make PerfMon log what processes were using how much RAM at a given time.

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


The Fool posted:

You create a collector set, pick the items you want to monitor, then the location to save to disk.

If you have azure you can install an azure monitor agent and then use log analytics.

Sure, but there doesn't seem to be an option in the collector set to select "RAM usage by process" or whatever, maybe I'm just terrible at this program.

No Azure here, it's just a random Windows server in a room somewhere

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Gort
Aug 18, 2003


Bob Morales posted:

Jfc 3/5 of my department has covid including me

Did they make you all work from the office during the pandemic?

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