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Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Salary negotiations is another recurring one that pops up every 2-3 pages. This is the one I've recommended in the last two Working in IT threads, the LI thread, and the Stairmasters LI group:

http://www.kalzumeus.com/2012/01/23/salary-negotiation/

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Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

MC Fruit Stripe posted:

It's a great article, but yelling "SIX FIGGA BEEYOTCH" is a lot more effective than you might imagine, so just remember there are a few approaches here.

The part about the article I think is the most effective and has served me well is the notion that while salary is an emotionally charged topic for me, it's a cell in a spreadsheet for them - it's helped me negotiate an extra 40K in *additional* salary over the last 3 years. Obviously YMMV.

I don't discuss salary with recruiters until it's offer time. If they insist, then they can provide a range. If they won't give a range then that's a flare in the road for me.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Farting is always funny.

My favorite is the "elevator pitch".

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

whaam posted:

Do most of you guys have a plan to move into management or project management as you get closer to 40? You don't see many systems engineers, administrators, etc in the 40-55 age range. Is that just due to our industry being so new, or is the usual path into management the only way to avoid being aged out of the industry?

I'm in a senior technical position right now (systems engineer) but often think that I need a plan to move up even though I'm perfectly happy at the moment. My city is too small to have any real opportunities to specialize in one area and I'm too firmly planted with family to move to a bigger city. I keep an eye on the job listings and I rarely see senior technical positions come up and when they do they seem to match my current duties pretty closely.

What is the long term path for someone like me? (Early 30s) I've already moved away from day to day administration to strictly design and project work, but I'd hate to think I've peaked already... For the record though I do enjoy what I do now, and the money is great.

I did that transition at 38, transitioning from software engineer to project management via QA management. For me it was a concerted desire to get my rear end off of critical path. Also, 90% of the Project Managers I've met are overpaid stenographers, and I knew I could do better. Low bar, I know.

Che Delilas posted:


If I were a manager my whole day would be smacking people upside the head and telling them to grow up, stop acting like they're in high school, and stop treating other people like poo poo. My whole day.


This. It's actually a lot of fun. After a while, people pucker when I walk into their meetings, because they know they are going to get a quiety delivered ration of poo poo for treating one of the human beings who works in my group like a vending machine. It usually happens once or twice on a project. Third time, someone's taking some time off to spend with their family, explore other career options, or go back to school.

Feral Bueller fucked around with this message at 14:06 on Aug 1, 2014

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Dark Helmut posted:

I don't want to bore you all with recruiter talk, but I do think it's important for you all to tell the difference between good recruiters and the mercenaries out there.

Would love a technical recruiter thread. There's a lot of anecdotes flying around -- I know I'm guilty of it -- and it would be great to get your perspective.

I always just link to the Kalzumeus blog post, as it's worked so well for me, but I recognize that might not be the case for everyone.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Looping back on salary talk: Was having a long talk yesterday with my mentor (worked with/for him at various positions over the last 20 years) and he said that the biggest reason they've lost candidates in the last 12-18 months is the candidates have a better offer. He said 75% of the time. This is Big 4 consulting, and he's very data-sensitive, so I'm confident he's not pulling the number out of the air.

talk: the reason why we were talking about offers is that I had just gotten off the phone with "my recruiter" - in 3 weeks I've gone from PM-ing someone tangential to a post in SH/SC Jobs to a final approval interview with an SVP person. This is an alarmingly specific dreamjob: work at [x] company in [y] division with [z] responsibilities. They had me on campus for 5 hours meeting with all of the constituents I'd be working with - it's a very integration-heavy position. The last interview was with a very heavy hitter in the industry: I knew who he was by name.


Question1: what did you do to prepare for this interview?
Answer1: I watched "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" - Gene Wilder Version. I feel like Charlie Bucket.

That got a big smile.

Question2: management style: Carrot or Stick.
Answer2: Ear.

We spent the next hour+ discussing as many particulars of the job as he was able to. There was a lot of "we can't talk about that until you're on-board".

Back to recruiter...

She made a point of letting me know that my salary requirements were "in range", and asked me 3x if I had another offer. I was very open about my current situation and roadmap. She seemed more nervous than I, made it clear that they were fast-tracking me, etc.

TL:DR - wages are going up because there's more money moving around again, there are new IT initiatives being executed on, currently employed people with a history of performing are highly desirable, and intelligent companies have started to figure that out.

Feral Bueller fucked around with this message at 14:42 on Aug 21, 2014

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Tab8715 posted:

Maybe a manager can chime in, is there a good reason for this?

Proactive Butthurt Mitigation.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Methanar posted:

Am I kicking rear end?

Yes.

Worst case scenario, you've spent 2 years figuring out that you want to do something else, and can transfer to a university with a fair number of GE credits done and a reasonably marketable skill set that will keep you from having to work food service or retail to get yourself through a four-year degree.

It sounds like you also have a great opportunity to be speaking Mandarin with a high degree of fluency at the end of two years, which would also be very helpful.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Who I'm reporting to, and the quality of that relationship, is the single largest factor in my job satisfaction.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

- Blizzard is checking references.

Just in time - current engagement, the client manager is on the verge of being the subject of a Title VII complaint. Good times.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

is now official: I start at Blizzard in 4 weeks.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

skipdogg posted:

You're a brave man. I couldn't work for a gaming company. Job security is less than non existent.


At Blizzard, you get a sword for 5 years of service. I saw a lot of swords.

In response to an earlier question:

I'll be working on infrastructure initiatives.

Feral Bueller fucked around with this message at 19:06 on Sep 13, 2014

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

FISHMANPET posted:

I have no doubt they would love it. They'd also love it if their meal was free, but that doesn't mean they should do it. That doesn't mean it's a good idea. And I'm sure at least one person would say "hey why aren't you cooking my meal instead of telling me it's going to take longer?"

To extend the analogy, there are a lot of busboys who think that they're chefs.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

FISHMANPET posted:

Obviously you guys don't know me so I could be making all this poo poo up, but I am the lead sysadmin for this group (in that I actually do sysadmin stuff, we're currently engineering a domain migration), and essentially the number 2 Windows guy on staff. I also have no problem communicating with staff and this office is mostly ladies in their 50s, and they all love me. I'll go up there to help them with stupid stuff because it is so close, and often that's easier than trying to fix something over the phone. But I'm not going to walk upstairs just to ask a simple question.

In 2004, I was hired to provide Tier 3 operational support for the ISP of a top 10 research university - 2 FTEs and approximately 2 dozen part-time students providing Tier 1 and 2 support. One of the first major issues I solved was a cross-departmental issue that was impacting user email quotas. I solved this problem by getting up, walking approximately 25 feet, and having a 5 minute conversation with a developer in one of the other departments. The impact at the university level was significant, and enabled the university ISP to execute against several significant campus-wide initiatives impacting 300,000+ users.

I've been in management since 6 months after I started there, and I'm making 3x what I was making in 2004 and having a lot of fun in the process.

You can either choose to look at face time as a waste or an investment. YMMV.

Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

There's a virtual appliance. The B200 equivalent (in 2004) was about $5000 with a 20 seat license. It was excellent, but not cheap.

http://www.bomgar.com/docs/content/.../comparison.htm

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Feral Bueller
Apr 23, 2004

Fun is important.


Nap Ghost

Roargasm posted:

Jira is completely cost prohibitive if you're not sharing accounts through, I think it's $10 for ten users and $1000 for a hundred? Beats the $1200/yr "IT management" system that I gutted through

It gets even more cost prohibitive when you factor in widgets. Another fun thing about widgets is managing the conflicts between widget versions and Atlassian updates. Best of all is when your widget maker either decides that they don't want to be on the upgrade treadmill any longer, or the widget gets popular and you start paying thousands of dollars to keep your widgets up-to-date.

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