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Bo-Pepper

Want some rye?
Course ya do!


Hello. I am Bo-Pepper. Former restaurant employee, current home cooking enthusiast and man who is old in internet years. I have made a number of cooking threads in recent months and interest has been expressed in having cooking chat made into one fancy thread for one stop shopping. I am not the only one by far who has good cooking info. Om Nom Nom is someone who actually cooks for a living, or so he says, I don't believe that's actually possible. And I know I've seen some good culinary chat bubble up from lots of folks from time to time.

So what is this thread for? It's for effortposting about food and talking about food and cooking. You can also talk about how food turns into poop that exits from our butts though it wouldn't be in the spirit of the conversation. I mean do whatever. It's BYOB.

To be clear, this is not Bo-Pepper's house of food. This is for everyone. If you have something you want to post about, go to town. With that said, I have a submission straight away.

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Bo-Pepper

Want some rye?
Course ya do!


So I made breakfast today. What did I have? I made an egg salad sandwich. Let's talk about my egg salad sandwich breakfast.

It's summer so some nice stuff is available. I'll list all the ingredients I used though not everything is pictured as of yet.


eggs
a tomato
an onion
dill
celery seed
salt
pepper
mayonnaise
fresh pickle slices



Hard boil the eggs. There are lots of different techniques people use to hard boil eggs. Here is the right one:

code:
Put your eggs in a sauce pan.  
Fill the sauce pan with cold water until the eggs are well covered with water.  
Cover the pan.  
Heat the pan on high until it boils.  
When it boils, turn the heat off.  
Wait ten minutes.
Remove the eggs from the pan and put them in a bowl with cold water.  
You now have hard boiled eggs.
The advantage of this technique is that it is more forgiving than another one that involves constantly putting heat into the pan. It becomes very easy to overcook them when that is the case. A pan off the heat has only so much energy to put into the eggs, resulting in much more consistent results with less worry.



Chop up some onion. How much onion you use in your egg salad is up to you. I don't use a ton. Celery is also nice to add to egg salad but I don't have any. The celery seed adds some nice celery flavor to the mix though.



Grate some raw garlic. This step is easily omitted. I just happen to like the little extra bite the raw garlic adds. Oh and see that rasp grater I'm using? Get one if you don't have one. It is perfect for zesting citrus, grating cinnamon or nutmeg, making a nice pulp of garlic. All sorts of things. It's irreplaceable.


Oh, Bo-Pepper-chan! When will we be together? I want to be in inside you!

Take out one of the pickles you have in the fridge and slice some thin chips from it. Put it back in the brine. They're not ready yet!



Peel the eggs.



Perfecto.



Chop up the eggs and mix in the chopped dill, onion, celery seed, salt and pepper with it. I don't use too much mayonnaise. Gets too slimy very quickly with too much mayo.

Now mix it up. Take an unusable blurry picture of the results.



Ungh tomato UNGH Oh UNGH



Use your favorite sandwich bread. In this case, I use challah bread which I toast.



Assemble sandwich. Drink it with watermelon lemonade. You're doing summer right.

arghfist


Bo-Pepper posted:

code:
Put your eggs in a sauce pan.  
Fill the sauce pan with cold water until the eggs are well covered with water.  
Cover the pan.  
Heat the pan on high until it boils.  
When it boils, turn the heat off.  
Wait ten minutes.
Remove the eggs from the pan and put them in a bowl with cold water.  
You now have hard boiled eggs.

correct. any other method is a sad failure

tao of lmao

by Lowtax

arghfist posted:

correct. any other method is a sad failure

it's so simple, yet it's one of those things that no one really does right

4outof5

Leader of the ULT Right.
Grabbing pussy since April 2, 1994

quote:

Drink it with watermelon lemonade

you ruined this thread

i am he


That's some good lookin food. What's your favorite meal to make bo-pepper? Or just some you really like, it's usually hard for people to pick favorite things.

i am he


Everybody should go to a ramen bar/restaurant and try some restaurant ramen. It's delicious and a million times better than the packaged kind. I want to try and make it at home but it seems very difficult.

GODSPEED JOHN GLENN


I put my thumb up my bum and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth.

I'm beginning to suspect that bo-pepper might be a fat guy

saboten


i am he posted:

Everybody should go to a ramen bar/restaurant and try some restaurant ramen. It's delicious and a million times better than the packaged kind. I want to try and make it at home but it seems very difficult.

i had a student in japan whose dad owns naruto's favourite ramen place like it was the author's fave place at uni and he wrote it into the show/manga....................... anime isnt real

she took me into the kitchen and showed me all the cool ramen stuff it's so good but gently caress boiling pig bones for like 8 hours

food good. make more food everyone

i am he


saboten posted:

i had a student in japan whose dad owns naruto's favourite ramen place like it was the author's fave place at uni and he wrote it into the show/manga....................... anime isnt real

she took me into the kitchen and showed me all the cool ramen stuff it's so good but gently caress boiling pig bones for like 8 hours

food good. make more food everyone

thats awesome haha. but ya tonkotsu ramen seems impossible for me to make at home.

poverty goat


saboten



hahah

bacalou



here are some really great youtube channels that produce weekly recipe videos

https://www.youtube.com/user/cookingwithdog
https://www.youtube.com/user/foodwishes
https://www.youtube.com/user/runnyrunny999
https://www.youtube.com/user/Maangchi

they are all pretty byobby

vapoursquid

none other

GODSPEED JOHN GLENN


I put my thumb up my bum and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth.

om nom nom

om nom nom nom nom nom nom
Yay food thread!
i dont really have anything specific to say at this point, just that i love food. so much. i feel like im lucky that i get paid to do my hobby, i dont know how many people can say that but not many i would imagine.

so feel free to ask anything about the professional kitchen or whatever you want. i fear i am pretty far removed from standard home cooking, my recipes tend to have several steps and cooking processes, and a meal would require several recipes. i posted this pic in another thread but my corned beef hash is a good example:


to get to that i brined a beef brisket in sodium nitrite, salt, brown sugar, bay leaf, and juniper berries
once it was done it was a 24hour braise at 200 in red wine with thyme, garlic, rosemary, shallots, more juniper, bay leaf, mustard seed,coriander and a couple of other things

then this happened:

I took some potatoes and peeled then, and confited (confit'd) them in salad oil and butter, with shallots, garlic, thyme, rosemary (we call these aromatics they come up a lot)black peppercorns and a couple of other things, and let that go for 4 hours at 250. Confiting is just like braising, you just use a fat/oil base instead of a water base.

fine diced up some carrots, celery, and onions (mirepoix) and cut the potatoes into nice 1/2" cubes. sauteed them to get a little color on them, a touch of salt, deglazed with a bit of the braising liquid, and added the shredded corned beef. i threw in a couple of cups' worth of veal demi too for good measure (veal demi gets its own post, that's another three day process). At the end once it came off the heat i folded in the potatoes, they were cooked and i didnt want them getting mushy.

then i sold a 6oz portion with 2 over easy eggs on top and some nice fruit salad on the side for $15.95.

but yea i love food. came to post a quick hi and wound up typing you guys one of my secret recipes that gets me money. these things happen

om nom nom

om nom nom nom nom nom nom
also my phone is from the stone age someone else took that i dont have many pics of my food sry

dogcrash truther

by Lowtax

What kind of restaurant do you work in?

om nom nom

om nom nom nom nom nom nom
right now i work in yellowstone national park, im the head chef of one of the restaurants there...its one of the more upscale restaurants in the park, but we still definitly have to cater to the tourists. being the chef i get a lot of time to do what i want with food, hence spending 2 (passive) weeks making corned beef hash.

before this summer season i worked at a really nice and really expensive french bistro for 2 years, which is probably where i learned the most since culinary school, probably even more than school, about technique and ingredients

dogcrash truther

by Lowtax

That sounds amazing.

i am he


drat.

i am he


dogcrash truther posted:

That sounds amazing.

Seriously.

om nom nom

om nom nom nom nom nom nom
im definitly not pissed about my current status. the toughest thing right now is i get 6 weeks off in between summer and winter then winter and summer, cause its seasonal work. and not like paid vacation like move out from where you live you are now unemployed and homeless. its sweet to travel 3 months a year in my mid 20's but ill probably want something more stable in the next couple of years. i definitly have a few more years of this in me i love what i do and where im doing it

i am he


That's pretty young for a head chef isnt it? What kind of cuisine do you specialize in?

om nom nom

om nom nom nom nom nom nom
like i said its seasonal work, which is unattractive to a lot of people, and i am the head chef of one of the restaurants. i work for an executive chef and exec sous, who are in charge of all of the restaurants in yellowstone.

i suppose newer age french/american? that's what i have the most experience with, its kind of hard to say. french and asian cuisine are my favorite, that's for sure. in my opinion with globalization i like to just put ingredients that taste good together, together. for plating i suppose i have to choose whether it looks like a french plate or an asian plate, or whatever.

for an example, i made a lamb wrap for the special tonight. the lamb was braised in red wine, and shredded, then shallow fried in a saute pan for service (classical french techniques), and put in a flatbread (greek) wrap that was spread with garlic butter (french), griddled, then spread with hummus (middle eastern) and the other ingredients were carrot slaw (german) with kalamata olives (greece) and spring greens tossed in black currant aoili(france/western europe)

Once could argue that the wrap on the whole was greek/mediterranean. but the techniques are different than when they were developing their cuisine, and other ingredients and styles were used that the classic greek would not have used. i had some lamb, started braising it cause that takes a long time, then went to work on the rest of it, with the flavors and ingredients in mind more than one specific nationality or style.

om nom nom

om nom nom nom nom nom nom
also i really do spend a lot of my free time reading and learning about food and im super loving serious in the kitchen so that could be why they let me run a restaurant at my age

peanut



Please sperg about yogurt cultivation/use across cultures.

i am he


om nom nom posted:

like i said its seasonal work, which is unattractive to a lot of people, and i am the head chef of one of the restaurants. i work for an executive chef and exec sous, who are in charge of all of the restaurants in yellowstone.

i suppose newer age french/american? that's what i have the most experience with, its kind of hard to say. french and asian cuisine are my favorite, that's for sure. in my opinion with globalization i like to just put ingredients that taste good together, together. for plating i suppose i have to choose whether it looks like a french plate or an asian plate, or whatever.

for an example, i made a lamb wrap for the special tonight. the lamb was braised in red wine, and shredded, then shallow fried in a saute pan for service (classical french techniques), and put in a flatbread (greek) wrap that was spread with garlic butter (french), griddled, then spread with hummus (middle eastern) and the other ingredients were carrot slaw (german) with kalamata olives (greece) and spring greens tossed in black currant aoili(france/western europe)

Once could argue that the wrap on the whole was greek/mediterranean. but the techniques are different than when they were developing their cuisine, and other ingredients and styles were used that the classic greek would not have used. i had some lamb, started braising it cause that takes a long time, then went to work on the rest of it, with the flavors and ingredients in mind more than one specific nationality or style.

That's really cool. Your food sounds delicous to me.

Bo-Pepper

Want some rye?
Course ya do!


i am he posted:

That's some good lookin food. What's your favorite meal to make bo-pepper? Or just some you really like, it's usually hard for people to pick favorite things.

Thanks! I don't know what my favorite thing to cook is. Cooking for me definitely falls in the hobby category. I don't get to really focus as much as I would otherwise because baby but it's all good. I tend to seek out new projects, moving from one untried thing to another rather than honing a preferred dish.

The one thing I learned back to front in my life was cutting fish in North Carolina. I did that for hours a day for a few years. Funny to say it but I loved that job. Trying to achieve the perfect salmon filet day after day is some zen poo poo.

i am he


Bo-Pepper posted:

Thanks! I don't know what my favorite to cook is. Cooking for me definitely falls in the hobby category. I don't get to really focus as much as I would otherwise because baby but it's all good. I tend to seek out new projects, moving from one untried thing to another rather than giving a preferred dish.

The one thing I learned back to front in my life was cutting fish in North Carolina. I did that for hours a day for a few years. Funny to say it but I loved that job. Trying to achieve the perfect salmon filet day after day is some zen poo poo.

I think the fish cutting in "Jiro Dreams of Sushi" is one of the coolest parts actually. That documentary is very good in general.

Bo-Pepper

Want some rye?
Course ya do!


I'm envious of your training om nom nom. I've tried Asian cuisine from time to time but the results have always been lacking. I'm still deep in the read a recipe do that recipe without really understanding the underlying ideas yet stage when it comes to Asian food.

Bo-Pepper

Want some rye?
Course ya do!


i am he posted:

I think the fish cutting in "Jiro Dreams of Sushi" is one of the coolest parts actually. That documentary is very good in general.

It's definitely something that takes time to get the real feel of. Eventually it gets to the point where if you can't see through the spinal membrane of a filleted fish you get mad at yourself for wasting food left on the bone.

i am he


Bo-Pepper posted:

It's definitely something that takes time to get the real feel of. Eventually it gets to the point where if you can't see through the spinal membrane of a filleted fish you get mad at yourself for wasting food left on the bone.

I hate cleaning fish, but i can appreciate it.

om nom nom

om nom nom nom nom nom nom

Bo-Pepper posted:

I'm envious of your training om nom nom. I've tried Asian cuisine from time to time but the results have always been lacking. I'm still deep in the read a recipe do that recipe without really understanding the underlying ideas yet stage when it comes to Asian food.

i don't have a a whole lot of experience with it but i know i can replicate some flavors. one a nice thing about where i work, we have a lot of people from other countries come for a couple of months at a time on a work/travel visa. so ive taken some asian style ideas and ran with it, and all the while had someone from malaysia, thailand, or taiwan tasting it, and asking if it would be something they would like back home. its been especially helpful with broths, once you have a broth down the rest is easy.

literally this big



Here comes
the Squirtle Squad!

om nom nom posted:

corned beef hash

man why didn't I think of this? food you can smoke and get hosed up on. good work byob.

Bo-Pepper

Want some rye?
Course ya do!


How would you go about making a proper Asian broth. I mean I know how to make broth but Asian soups and ramen in particular have a quality I wouldn't know offhand how to replicate.

i am he


Bo-Pepper posted:

How would you go about making a proper Asian broth. I mean I know how to make broth but Asian soups and ramen in particular have a quality I wouldn't know offhand how to replicate.

as i mentioned above, im also very interested in this.

bacalou



most asian broths start with either bouillon, fermented bean paste, or katsuobushi (petrified skipjack tuna shavings)

you need those to get a good start on the basics

Afro Doug


Bo-Pepper posted:

How would you go about making a proper Asian broth. I mean I know how to make broth but Asian soups and ramen in particular have a quality I wouldn't know offhand how to replicate.

bonito flakes or seaweed, i believe

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om nom nom

om nom nom nom nom nom nom

Bo-Pepper posted:

How would you go about making a proper Asian broth. I mean I know how to make broth but Asian soups and ramen in particular have a quality I wouldn't know offhand how to replicate.

take whatever stock (chicken, beef, vegetable)and simmer it for another hour with some whole garlic+mushrooms (i use portabella stems we've saved from other projects but any tasty mushroom works it can just get expensive), strain + soy sauce, fish sauce, bonito flakes-fermented fish stuff+mushrooms=umami overload

you can also make dashi which is japanese "sea stock"-i haven't had much experience with it but i know it uses "kombu" which is sun dried kelp and bonito flakes

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