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Strong Convections
May 8, 2008


BoJack is responsible for his own actions.

Because what you've said is summarised by this:

Bifauxnen posted:

... the status quo where any time a cool male antihero starts to get questioned to bring up some accountability, people sidetrack into yelling about how some other thing a woman did makes her way more of a megabitch.

BoJack wanted to do the stunt. PC told him not to. That's why he was injured. How is it that she simultaneously has control of him to do the show and yet does not have the control to stop him being stupid and doing a stunt that injures him? (It's because BoJack is responsible for his own actions.)

The consequences to PC aren't as explicit, but enabling BoJack damages every part of her life. It's only as she pulls away from him do we see her life getting better. She's intelligent, resilient, resourceful, and has a can-do attitude, and has been dragged down for years by the weight that is BoJack Horseman.

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luxury handset
Jan 24, 2018

THE DEM DEFENDER HAS LOGGED ON


Chef Boyardeez Nuts posted:

One thing I noticed in my rewatch is that I think they had the idea for the finale in the can for years. There isn't much of "the View from Halfway Down" that isn't set up by the end of season 2.

https://www.vulture.com/2020/02/boj...al-history.html

quote:

Bob-Waksberg: I don’t want to say it was planned from the beginning of the series, but certainly when we were thinking, “What is causing BoJack to go into this place?,” we knew that he was relapsing and drinking and doing drugs again. It felt like, “Oh yeah, he could just pass out on the couch … or it could be in the pool. Let’s go that way. That is much more resonant.” In the credits, but also throughout the series, there have been so many references to swimming and drowning. It felt like a nice pay-off.

Bust Rodd
Oct 21, 2008

TURDS BOD



The pool being such. Major part of the opening credits, and the credits themselves being part of the show and staying engaging after 6 seasons was impressive on its own.

Ugly In The Morning
Jul 1, 2010

Don't look at me-
I'm ugly in the morning
When the headaches gone
The sun is not.
Forgot to turn the alarm
On - on




Pillbug

Bust Rodd posted:

The pool being such. Major part of the opening credits, and the credits themselves being part of the show and staying engaging after 6 seasons was impressive on its own.

I think BoJack might have the best opening credits sequence in TV history. I can’t think of any other show where I’d actually pay attention to them every episode.

Beefeater1980
Sep 12, 2008

My God, it's full of Horatios!





Bojack is a tragic figure, whose tragic flaw is his desperate need for constant validation from others; as an actor, as a celebrity, as attractive and as a cool/fun person. Everything bad he does is in service of feeding the fleeting high of feeling good about himself.

Mr PB is the antithesis of all of this: he is utterly at peace with himself and although he likes being around other people, he is ultimately not dependent on them.

Incelshok Na
Jul 2, 2020


More like bareback horseman, amirite?

Xealot
Nov 25, 2002

Showdown in the Galaxy Era.



Beefeater1980 posted:

Mr PB is the antithesis of all of this: he is utterly at peace with himself and although he likes being around other people, he is ultimately not dependent on them.

I never really viewed him this way. He's way more functional that Bojack, but I also see him as a bottomless pit of need in his own way. He strikes me as a love addict, the kind of person who needs constant affirmation in the form of huge romantic gestures and intense declarations of love to feel valued. His relationships have a pattern of intense love-bombing followed by burnout followed by existential despair. It's unsustainable, and there's a reason he's been married 4 (?) times by the end of the series.

Diane calls this out a few times, where the hugeness of MPB's overtures seem more about his need to feel Big Emotions than giving her something she wants or needs.

pixaal
Jan 8, 2004

All ice cream is now for all beings, no matter how many legs.


Mr pb seems close to happyness because he finds it but it's self destructive and no better than BoJacks fleeting happyness from drugs. In the end the only person closer to real happily ever after ending is Diane, she actually dealt with her problem and got on meds.

Chef Boyardeez Nuts
Sep 9, 2011

You're not getting another fucking dime from us, Lowtax

Mr. Peanutbutter is an old dog, but he's not abusive or self destructive. He'd be fine in a string of serial monogamous relationships with 20 somethings until he dies if he's up front about it.

Xealot
Nov 25, 2002

Showdown in the Galaxy Era.



He's also getting therapy in the end. "Is my problem with women any movie directed by Christopher Nolan? Because yes, women are involved, but it's never really about the women."

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exquisite tea
Apr 21, 2007

Carly shook her glass, willing the ice to melt. "You still haven't told me what the mission is."

She leaned forward. "We are going to assassinate the bad men of Hollywood."




My wife and I just finished the last season and now I'm kinda sad, because there's really nothing else I want to watch that's nearly as good and all my other favorite shows on Netflix are getting cancelled. It's kind of rare to find a show that's so consistent in quality, where all the characters grow in their own way without becoming urkelized parodies of themselves or continuing to make mind-numbingly irrational decisions from week to week. I felt Holly-hock's absence in the final two episodes to hit the hardest, since that was a relationship you got to see Bojack develop and destroy over the course of three full seasons. Painful. Very satisfied with how everything resolved -- a lot of successful shows continue way past their sell-by date but Bojack Horseman picked the perfect moment to let go.

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