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FCKGW
May 21, 2006

aaaaaaaaaa
AAAAAAAAAAA
HHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!



kloa posted:

If I have a mobo with Intel vPro, can I update the BIOS without a CPU present?

I ordered a ASUS Q87M-E motherboard and don't know what BIOS version it has installed, but I may need to flash it before the CPU I have will work with it

No

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Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


DizzyBum posted:

Yeah, I don't think the panel is dead either. All the diagnostics are coming back normal from this thing. Literally everything is acting normal except for the fact that the panel is a black screen. Even the backlight still works.

The other thread suggested the monitor might be stuck in some sort of "deep sleep" mode which is apparently an issue with some Dell monitors, so I'll try to look into that, too.

Man, I feel like I should start a blog with all the weird poo poo I come across that I can't find on Google.

Try a new cable before anything else. It does sound like the capacitors could be going, though, especially with the progressive decline of the panel.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


Naan Bread posted:

I'm shipping my gaming PC from home that has been sat in a garage for over two years. What are some things I should be wary of before powering it on for the first time?

I've thought about taking it all apart and clearing out dust/reseating the GPU and RAM, maybe reapplying some thermal paste. Will I need to replace the CMOS battery? It has been in a garage in England so the lowest and highest temps it would have experienced shouldn't have been more than -5C to 30C at the extreme so condensation shouldn't be an issue at this point. No mice or anything got to it as far as I can tell from a blurry picture my brother sent me.

After shipping it's good to re-seat everything (honestly it would be best to ship the graphics card disconnected, but I'm guessing it's too late for that). The bumps and vibrations while shipping can loosen cables and connectors. I doubt you'll have to do anything special besides that. If it boots up with the incorrect time or fails to keep the time you could replace the CMOS battery, but I'd wait to replace it until you know it's bad (they're usually a CR2032 button battery but check the battery type in it before purchasing anything). I boot up old PCs fairly regularly and usually they don't need much. Any dust inside will likely be from when it was last running and not new.

DizzyBum
Apr 16, 2007

Archen used Flail!
It's super-effective!




Rexxed posted:

Try a new cable before anything else. It does sound like the capacitors could be going, though, especially with the progressive decline of the panel.

That was one of the first things I tried. Actually, all the cables I used *seem* to be working fine (again, diagnostics looking good no matter what I try).

I will likely try to open it up later to see what might be happening.

Hipster_Doofus
Dec 20, 2003

Lovin' every minute of it.

Yeah bad caps is a good bet. There are very few few ways that electronics can gradually fail and that's surely the most common one.

DizzyBum
Apr 16, 2007

Archen used Flail!
It's super-effective!




I opened up the monitor last night and tried to get a good look at some of the caps, but I didn't see anything that stood out to me. Nothing bulging or looking weird. And as far as I could see, all of the connectors looked good and snug. If I wanted to look at everything, I would have had to take a lot of extra time to disassemble it, so I gave up after a certain point.

I'll go back to my 1920x1080 dual-monitor setup for now, and when I've got some more free time, I'll really open it up and look at all the boards. I don't know how test the components, though. Guess it's time to learn!

I just wish I could find someone else that's had the exact same problem and wrote about it. The only thing I've been able to find has been Dell's general advice - "If you turn on the monitor and you don't see the self-test, the monitor is faulty. But we don't fix/repair our own monitors, we just replace them while they're still in warranty. "

DizzyBum fucked around with this message at Feb 14, 2018 around 15:45

lllllllllllllllllll
Feb 28, 2010

Now the scene's lighting is perfect!


Recently built a PC for somebody (i5-8400, Macho Rev. B, and Asrock Z370M Pro4). It's the perfect combination of performance and quiet efficiency as far as I'm concerned but mostly due to the mainboard's "silent" profile for the fan. If I need to I can create my own custom profile too. I haven't seen any other modern mainboard's options, so my question is: Is this exclusively for the overclockable boards or do even the cheaper boards provide these options nowadays? I plan to buy another board when the cheaper coffe lake boards are out, but if this is exclusive to the 3xx boards I'll stick with them. Thanks.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

lllllllllllllllllll posted:

Recently built a PC for somebody (i5-8400, Macho Rev. B, and Asrock Z370M Pro4). It's the perfect combination of performance and quiet efficiency as far as I'm concerned but mostly due to the mainboard's "silent" profile for the fan. If I need to I can create my own custom profile too. I haven't seen any other modern mainboard's options, so my question is: Is this exclusively for the overclockable boards or do even the cheaper boards provide these options nowadays? I plan to buy another board when the cheaper coffe lake boards are out, but if this is exclusive to the 3xx boards I'll stick with them. Thanks.
Pretty much any motherboard can tell the CPU fan to adjust its speed based on temperature. Where they differ is in whether additional fan headers are controllable, and if they can actually control the amount of power supplied for fans that don't support their own speed control. Good fan speed control is considered a premium feature.

lllllllllllllllllll
Feb 28, 2010

Now the scene's lighting is perfect!


Alereon posted:

Pretty much any motherboard can tell the CPU fan to adjust its speed based on temperature. Where they differ is in whether additional fan headers are controllable, and if they can actually control the amount of power supplied for fans that don't support their own speed control. Good fan speed control is considered a premium feature.

My Sandy Bridge board only has this simple option to set fan speed I think. If fan profiles nowadays are unique to z-boards I'll stick to those, even though I don't overclock. Thanks.

IratelyBlank
Dec 2, 2004
The only easy day was yesterday

What's the deal with old servers posted on ebay for what seems like extremely cheap? I am looking at Poweredge servers with dual Xeons and 64 GB of memory for $200 and I'm wondering what the catch is? I have to share a small workstation farm with several other people in my research group to run simulation software (it's all distributed and remote) and while this is on the low-end of our workstation specs, a few of these would significantly offset the computational load for me if there isn't anything weird going on and and I can just plug it in and install an OS. Power consumption isn't an issue because this won't be in my home.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


IratelyBlank posted:

What's the deal with old servers posted on ebay for what seems like extremely cheap? I am looking at Poweredge servers with dual Xeons and 64 GB of memory for $200 and I'm wondering what the catch is? I have to share a small workstation farm with several other people in my research group to run simulation software (it's all distributed and remote) and while this is on the low-end of our workstation specs, a few of these would significantly offset the computational load for me if there isn't anything weird going on and and I can just plug it in and install an OS. Power consumption isn't an issue because this won't be in my home.

Usually they're just loud rackmount servers with first or second gen i7-equivalent xeons. There's a lot of good deals to be had there if you just want a lot of cores and ram and don't care about noise. There are some even older ones with core2quad equivalent xeons that aren't such a good deal because they use DDR2 and are a bit long in the tooth. The main things to check hardware wise is to look up the Xeon on wikipedia and compare it to others in its generation and check if you're getting enough RAM for dual or triple channel (whichever is available). Also check if the board can boot off SATA disks or if you need SAS drives. The other main things to check are that the seller has good feedback and that shipping costs won't kill the deal.

You can also check natex.us for old servers. They remount old server boards in Phanteks full tower cases (great cases for $100) and sell them preconfigured, but they're a bit more expensive that way. They also have a lot of other server hardware.

You can boot pretty much any of those servers and install windows or linux on them. Most are old enough that Windows 8 or 10 will have all of the drivers.

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Hipster_Doofus
Dec 20, 2003

Lovin' every minute of it.

Say you aren't gonna game or even watch HD stuff or whatever and don't care about noise. Would one of those with a nice ssd provide a shockingly lighting fast desktop experience?

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