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Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



I think since Vista a non-quick format zero fills already.

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Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Flipperwaldt posted:

I think since Vista a non-quick format zero fills already.
A quick format basically just wipes the FAT and marks all clusters as free, a full format also tests all sectors to see if they work. A quick format definitely doesn't remove data (you can tell it doesn't take long enough), a full format should be sufficient, but to be safe I'd do a single full overwrite pass before selling a drive.

On Windows 7 and later a quick format will send TRIM commands to SSDs and trigger them to actually erase the deleted dated, however this doesn't happen immediately and isn't guaranteed to happen at all. Before selling an SSD you should perform a "Secure Erase" rather than an overwrite, which guarantees that all data is wiped and the drive is returned to factory-fresh condition.

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



Alereon posted:

a full format also tests all sectors to see if they work.
Sorry if this is the dumbest question, but testing involves writing to it in this case, right?

And thanks for clearing that up. Full format is what I meant; a lot less confusing than what I called it.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Flipperwaldt posted:

Sorry if this is the dumbest question, but testing involves writing to it in this case, right?

And thanks for clearing that up. Full format is what I meant; a lot less confusing than what I called it.
Actually I just mis-read your post as saying a quick format, sorry! So yes, you are correct, the full format should erase the entire partition one sector at a time, though I don't actually know if it tests the entirety of every sector on every drive (including modern Advanced Format HDDs).

Gromit
Aug 15, 2000

I am an oppressed White Male, Asian women wont serve me! Save me Campbell Newman!!!!!!!


whatupdet posted:

I have the free version of CCleaner, will that suffice?

Any tool that writes to every sector will suffice - they are all essentially the same. If you wanted to be extra careful, you would find a tool that supports Secure Erase, which is an ATA command that wipes drives. It should be a little quicker than a zero-fill and will also try and wipe parts that a standard wiping tool may miss due to bad sector mapping.
I say "find a tool", but that includes a motherboard that supports passing the specific ATA command to your disks.

Honestly, even if your wiping tool skips bad sectors (and if the sector can't be read or written to then you can't do much about it) even if some heavy-hitter got access to the data in those areas there are pretty low odds of them getting anything useful out of it. If you cared that much, you'd physically destroy any disks that had bad sectors.

Saoshyant
Oct 26, 2010



I want to buy a Bluetooth dongle to use my console controllers, but I'm completely ignorant on the different Bluetooth standards. From what I have read, use of Wii hardware relies on Bluetooth standard 2.0 with a preference for 2.1 -- why, I have no idea. PS3 seems to rely on a standard called CSR which seems to be a synonym with version 4.0 of the standard. Finally, the Wii U controller seems fine with the 2.1, but god knows what standard the PS4 controller uses.

Help me pick a Bluetooth dongle that isn't absurdly expensive and which can (hopefully) support all of those consoles. I guess I can also accept two dongles if that's the best cost-effective and/or practical solution.

dont be mean to me
May 2, 2007

I'm interplanetary, bitch
Let's go to Mars




Wiimotes: If you're using Windows, aaaaahahahah - for Mac or Linux it might actually not destroy your sanity, despite Nintendo's best efforts (they don't like people using their Nintendo accessories with not-Nintendo hardware much).

For PS3 controllers yeah you're probably fine as long as your Bluetooth adapter isn't garbage (although this is kind of a tall order). You may just want to blow five bucks on a 5m Mini-USB cable for the DualShock 3; then just use Scarlet.Crush's XInput Wrapper or ... probably works natively in OS X or Linux.

Or better yet a DualShock 4, Micro-USB cable and appropriate driver.

If you still want to go ahead with the Bluetooth you're probably best off with the Wiimote Adapter from the link and ... do you have Wi-Fi? Because the Intel 7260 (now in desktop kits too!) is the best drat Wi-Fi card on the planet and it supports both Wireless-AC and Bluetooth 4.0 - but be warned OS X has no idea what to do with it (though if you have a Mac you should already have Wi-Fi and Bluetooth so just use those).

dont be mean to me fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2014 around 17:17

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Sir Unimaginative posted:

Because the Intel 7260 (now in desktop kits too!) is the best drat Wi-Fi card on the planet and it supports both Wireless-AC and Bluetooth 4.0 .
This is true, but be warned that Intel re-uses model numbers, so make sure you are getting the current Wireless-AC 7260, not the older 7260 models, like the N version. If you are using a good Wireless-AC router and adapter you really will get wired-equivalent performance.

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



Sir Unimaginative posted:

Because the Intel 7260 (now in desktop kits too!) is the best drat Wi-Fi card on the planet and it supports both Wireless-AC and Bluetooth 4.0
I'm not going to type it all out again, I'll just link you to a post I made earlier, outlining how my personal experience with the 7260 makes me disagreee very strongly with that statement.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Flipperwaldt posted:

I'm not going to type it all out again, I'll just link you to a post I made earlier, outlining how my personal experience with the 7260 makes me disagreee very strongly with that statement.
Your issues were caused by your router crashing under load. You didn't see the issue with other adapters because they weren't good enough to place the router under significant load. You likely would have seen similar behavior with other decent-quality Wireless-AC adapters.

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



Alereon posted:

Your issues were caused by your router crashing under load. You didn't see the issue with other adapters because they weren't good enough to place the router under significant load. You likely would have seen similar behavior with other decent-quality Wireless-AC adapters.
That may be an adequate explanation for the case where the whole router was taken off the air. Router crash seems less plausible for the much more frequent cases where all other connected devices can keep on working without issue during the time the laptop with 7260 AC thinks there's a problem. Intense bluetooth traffic reliably murdering wifi speeds also cannot possibly have a lot to do with that either.

Swear to god that I understand that it gets recommended because likely it works well for a lot of people in a lot of settings and that I'd love to have an alternative explanation that allows me to fix it.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Flipperwaldt posted:

That may be an adequate explanation for the case where the whole router was taken off the air. Router crash seems less plausible for the much more frequent cases where all other connected devices can keep on working without issue during the time the laptop with 7260 AC thinks there's a problem. Intense bluetooth traffic reliably murdering wifi speeds also cannot possibly have a lot to do with that either.

Swear to god that I understand that it gets recommended because likely it works well for a lot of people in a lot of settings and that I'd love to have an alternative explanation that allows me to fix it.
Note that you can't use Bluetooth and 2.4Ghz WiFi simultaneously, you CAN use Bluetooth and 5Ghz WiFi simultaneously. In addition to using the same frequency band as 2.4Ghz WiFi, most dual-band combo adapters use the same radio hardware for Bluetooth and 2.4Ghz WiFi, so they have to "timeshare." This can work well for light usage, but once you start having heavier data transfers it quickly becomes apparent. Bluetooth 3.0+ High-Speed is able to actually send data over the WiFi connection, so I don't believe this timesharing is necessary, though it still would reduce the WiFi data throughput on the same frequency band. I think even Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy might improve things since its biggest purpose is to reduce the amount of time the radio is in use, leaving more time for the WiFi.

I'm not saying Intel's drivers are perfect and you didn't encounter real issues, though I've had good experiences on the 7260-AC with both great and lovely routers, but it is pretty important to set reasonable expectations for the performance you'll get.

Bonus next day edit: Bluetooth High-speed was actually introduced in Bluetooth 3.0, not 4.0 like I said above. The reason impact could be very severe is that, for example, if you're running at nearly 100% utilization of the Bluetooth link, the adapter has nearly 0% of its time to devote to WiFi traffic, so you might get basically no throughput. I could see this getting even worse if the router is trying to send data (such as acknowledgement packets) while the adapter isn't listening because it's in Bluetooth mode. It doesn't take very many missed packets to completely gently caress throughput on TCP connections.

Alereon fucked around with this message at Oct 8, 2014 around 14:57

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



Alereon posted:

I'm not saying Intel's drivers are perfect and you didn't encounter real issues, though I've had good experiences on the 7260-AC with both great and lovely routers, but it is pretty important to set reasonable expectations for the performance you'll get.
EDIT: Sorry, let me clean this up a bit.

I am complaining about sub-56k speeds. It's an actual, but probably rare issue.

Anyway, thanks a lot for the explanation and the patience. I wouldn't have thought of it otherwise, but with the way those combined radios apparently work, it probably makes sense to see if a separate bluetooth usb dongle makes any difference until I upgrade to 5GHz. Sorry for all the venting and if I want to discuss the issue any more I'll create a Haus thread, because I'm definitely cluttering up this space.

Flipperwaldt fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2014 around 21:39

Psygnosis
Jul 30, 2003


Is it possible to convert an MBR boot disk to a GPT boot disk without data loss?
At the moment I have 2TB hard drive I'd like to upgrade it to a 4TB drive without having to start all over again if possible.
However it is not possible for an MBR disk to see more than 2TB and there doesn't look like a way to clone the disk (at least easily) to another format (GPT) without having to start from a fresh installation and copy bits and pieces manually.

Edit: My operating system is windows 7 64 bit.

Psygnosis fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2014 around 22:33

Saoshyant
Oct 26, 2010



Sir Unimaginative posted:

You may just want to blow five bucks on a 5m Mini-USB cable for the DualShock 3; then just use Scarlet.Crush's XInput Wrapper (...) Or better yet a DualShock 4, Micro-USB cable and appropriate driver.

Uh, I did hear the DS4 can be used with just a micro-USB cable, but AFAIK the DS3 only used the cable for charging the battery and the only way to use it on a computer would be Bluetooth. If that isn't correct however and I can use a cable as well, then I would only need a Bluetooth adapter that can deal with the Nintendo stuff making things (in theory) easier for me. Is that correct? I certainly don't mind cables and then I would only need one of the 2.1 Bluetooth standard dongles recommended for Wii stuff and recheck if it also works with the Wii U controller.

Sir Unimaginative posted:

Do you have Wi-Fi? Because the Intel 7260 (now in desktop kits too!) is the best drat Wi-Fi card on the planet and it supports both Wireless-AC and Bluetooth 4.0

Uh, my desktop is wired so I reckon this card would be a waste of money in my specific case.

ufarn
May 30, 2009


Am I correct in assuming that the Radeon 6870 uses a DVI-in on both its ports?

EDIT: And that one DVI-out and HDMI-out should work fine.

ufarn fucked around with this message at Oct 8, 2014 around 18:18

future ghost
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Bread Liar

DVI and HDMI are compatible with passive adapters so it'll work fine.

edit: Yeah there's no VIVO chip anymore so DVI-in won't work. Output-only.

future ghost fucked around with this message at Oct 8, 2014 around 19:49

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


ufarn posted:

Am I correct in assuming that the Radeon 6870 uses a DVI-in on both its ports?

EDIT: And that one DVI-out and HDMI-out should work fine.

DVI-in?

It's not a capture card. All of those plugs are outputs for screens. You can use any of the ports alone, both DVIs or one DVI and the HDMI. If you need two HDMI, you can use a simple pin adapter or DVI to HDMI cable on a DVI plug, but you won't get audio out of the DVI-connected plug. To these, you can add as many DisplayPort screens as you have ports (or more, with MST, up to six displays total).

Imazul
Sep 2, 2006

This was actually a lot more bearable than most of you made it out to be.


Hopefully I am in the right thread.

So I got a new 970 card and now I have an old 770 card collecting dust. Would I get any performance gain by setting it up as a dedicated Physx card? Can I actually set it as a dedicated Physx card even if my motherboard does not support SLI ?

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Imazul posted:

Hopefully I am in the right thread.

So I got a new 970 card and now I have an old 770 card collecting dust. Would I get any performance gain by setting it up as a dedicated Physx card? Can I actually set it as a dedicated Physx card even if my motherboard does not support SLI ?
You would see significant gains in games that use PhysX and support hardware acceleration...which is very, very few titles. Most games that use PhysX for gameplay (versus only graphical effects) don't support hardware acceleration.

future ghost
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Bread Liar

Probably easiest just to sell the 770 instead if you're not going to use it for a family member's PC or something since you'd just be adding to power requirements for edge-case benefits and they're still selling for around $170-$220 or so.

kuroshi
Nov 26, 2007



Fun Shoe

Saoshyant posted:

but AFAIK the DS3 only used the cable for charging the battery and the only way to use it on a computer would be Bluetooth.
No, the DS3 works perfectly fine with just the cable. However, if you're not rocking either Lunix or OS X, you'll still need a driver for it.

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


IOGear does this little Bluetooth 4.0 adapter. I think it might work well, but I actually can't tell because it turns out you can't run a Bluetooth stack on Windows Server, and all my other systems already have Bluetooth so I can't exactly test it...

This is not a very helpful recommendation, is it?

Imazul
Sep 2, 2006

This was actually a lot more bearable than most of you made it out to be.


cisco privilege posted:

Probably easiest just to sell the 770 instead if you're not going to use it for a family member's PC or something since you'd just be adding to power requirements for edge-case benefits and they're still selling for around $170-$220 or so.

This makes the most sense I guess. I didn't know they were so many little games that supported hardware Physx.

future ghost
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Bread Liar

Imazul posted:

This makes the most sense I guess. I didn't know they were so many little games that supported hardware Physx.
While physx can be cool as hell in the games that support it (tried out effects in BL2 on my CPU and they looked neat), most developers won't devote too many resources to a single-party solution that's heavily-dependent on cards with sufficient supporting compute hardware when most of the market won't see much benefit from it. Better to spend that development cash on gameplay, VA, and writing instead - or if you're Bioware maybe spend it on more poorly-animated elf sex I guess.

lady blue shanghai
Jun 17, 2012

iloveyouiloveyouiloveyou


Sorry but is there a thread like this for software? I need a program to do something and I want goon advice but I don't know where exactly to ask.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

lady blue shanghai posted:

Sorry but is there a thread like this for software? I need a program to do something and I want goon advice but I don't know where exactly to ask.
Two possibilities:
The useful Windows Freeware thread (what free app does what I need?)
The Windows and Windows Software Megathread

A thread in the Haus of Tech Support might be a good idea if you need more individualized help on how to accomplish something.

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


Really stupid question here: My motherboard has 4 3.0 usb ports directly on the mother board, and my case has 2 3.0 usb ports on the front (which are in fact plugged into my motherboard). Is there any difference between plugging an item into the front of my case versus directly onto the mobo at the rear of my case (in terms of latency, speed, etc)?

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Knifegrab posted:

Really stupid question here: My motherboard has 4 3.0 usb ports directly on the mother board, and my case has 2 3.0 usb ports on the front (which are in fact plugged into my motherboard). Is there any difference between plugging an item into the front of my case versus directly onto the mobo at the rear of my case (in terms of latency, speed, etc)?
There is no difference between internal and external ports pe se, however it is likely they are connected to a different controller chip on your motherboard so may give a different experience. On most systems four of the USB 3.0 ports are provided by the Intel chipset, the rest by another chip from a company like ASMedia, for example. The Intel controller generally works best.

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


Alereon posted:

There is no difference between internal and external ports pe se, however it is likely they are connected to a different controller chip on your motherboard so may give a different experience. On most systems four of the USB 3.0 ports are provided by the Intel chipset, the rest by another chip from a company like ASMedia, for example. The Intel controller generally works best.

Are we talking significant difference or just slight? As in should I make sure all my input controlls (keyboards/mouse/joysticks) are in my motherboard then to obtain the lowest latency?

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Knifegrab posted:

Are we talking significant difference or just slight? As in should I make sure all my input controlls (keyboards/mouse/joysticks) are in my motherboard then to obtain the lowest latency?
Your input devices should be connected to the black USB 2.0 ports on the back of the motherboard. Only USB 3.0 devices should be connected to USB 3.0 ports, and preferably to the Intel controller first, though how well devices work with the Intel vs 3rd Party controller varies by device. In theory USB 3.0 ports should be functionally identical to USB 2.0 ports for USB 2.0 devices since the extra pins aren't even connected, but it does not actually work like that for some reason, plenty of people see issues with their mice and keyboards when using USB 3.0 ports. Mass storage devices do often run better though.

Alereon fucked around with this message at Oct 10, 2014 around 17:14

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


Alereon posted:

Your input devices should be connected to the black USB 2.0 ports on the back of the motherboard. Only USB 3.0 devices should be connected to USB 3.0 ports, and preferably to the Intel controller first, though how well devices work with the Intel vs 3rd Party controller varies by device. In theory USB 3.0 ports should be functionally identical to USB 2.0 ports for USB 2.0 devices since the extra pins aren't even connected, but it does not actually work like that for some reason, plenty of people see issues with their mice and keyboards when using USB 3.0 ports. Mass storage devices do often run better though.

So what should I do if my motherboard only has two 2.0 usb ports, where my keyboard has two usb plugs and my mouse has one, and my hotas and rudder set up each have one as well (meaning I have 5 input plugs, but only two 2.0 usb ports)?

Geoj
May 28, 2008

BITTER POOR PERSON


Knifegrab posted:

So what should I do if my motherboard only has two 2.0 usb ports, where my keyboard has two usb plugs and my mouse has one, and my hotas and rudder set up each have one as well (meaning I have 5 input plugs, but only two 2.0 usb ports)?

Your options are either use a USB hub or USB 2.0 expansion card. Or a new system board with more 2.0 ports.

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


Geoj posted:

Your options are either use a USB hub or USB 2.0 expansion card. Or a new system board with more 2.0 ports.

Is there a recommended usb 2.0 expansion card? Reviews seem all over the map...

edit: Nvm found a good one. Thanks for the tips.

Knifegrab fucked around with this message at Oct 10, 2014 around 17:50

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Knifegrab posted:

So what should I do if my motherboard only has two 2.0 usb ports, where my keyboard has two usb plugs and my mouse has one, and my hotas and rudder set up each have one as well (meaning I have 5 input plugs, but only two 2.0 usb ports)?
Your motherboard has eight USB 2.0 ports, two directly on the back of the board and three headers along the bottom of the board. If your case doesn't have USB 2.0 support and you don't have your own D-brackets handy, you can pick them up from a computer parts store for like...$5, if they don't just give them to you for free because they have a box of a thousand. These just go in one of the I/O slot panels on the back of the machine and have a cable running to the USB 2.0 header on the motherboard, and are used if your case doesn't have a header to plug-in there instead.

Using a USB 2.0 add-in card would result in a very similar set of compatibility issues because it's a third-party controller, the point is that you want to be using the chipset USB 2.0 ports for an experience that is guaranteed to be issue-free with your legacy USB 2.0 devices.

Alereon fucked around with this message at Oct 10, 2014 around 17:44

Geoj
May 28, 2008

BITTER POOR PERSON


This is what he's referring to.

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


Hmm ok I'll look into that before I get a PCI usb thing.

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Knifegrab posted:

Hmm ok I'll look into that before I get a PCI usb thing.
Definitely do not buy an add-in card, it won't help you at all. If you can't get D-brackets use a powered hub (your keyboard has one right?) or just use the Intel USB 3.0 ports until filled, then the supplemental USB 3.0 ports.

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


Alereon posted:

Definitely do not buy an add-in card, it won't help you at all. If you can't get D-brackets use a powered hub (your keyboard has one right?) or just use the Intel USB 3.0 ports until filled, then the supplemental USB 3.0 ports.

I got the bracket linked above! Thanks for all the tips, it means a lot!

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Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



Alereon posted:

In theory USB 3.0 ports should be functionally identical to USB 2.0 ports for USB 2.0 devices since the extra pins aren't even connected, but it does not actually work like that for some reason, plenty of people see issues with their mice and keyboards when using USB 3.0 ports.
From personal experience and internet chatter, add a variety of low-latency USB 2.0 audio devices to the list of things that won't necessarily work as they should on a USB 3.0 port.

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