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Gentwise
Sep 12, 2003
Gentwise Bankfourthe, Esquire.

Am I losing anything by converting a displayport signal to hdmi? I'm using it for 1080p, video only. No audio through it.

Edit: thanks for the quick response!

Gentwise fucked around with this message at Oct 24, 2014 around 01:47

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Nintendo Kid
Aug 4, 2011

Trophy-ko says:
~death to capitalism~

Hilalry is 45


Gentwise posted:

Am I losing anything by converting a displayport signal to hdmi? I'm using it for 1080p, video only. No audio through it.

Not if your convertor is functioning normally.

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Sing this Corrosion posted:

Well that wasn't what I was expecting but thanks for the heads-up!
I'm cloning it onto a spare drive now. Lucky I had an old external drive to replace it with.

FYI: Don't clone it. The uncorrectable sectors means lost data. You will be copying corrupted material along with the bad. Use a file-based transfer instead of a block-based one so that you will be alerted to what you can't recover.

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


Alereon posted:

Clear the CMOS via the jumper on the board.

Doh, forgot that my board had this and it worked like a charm, thanks!


All my computer troubles lately stemmed from a hard drive dying. Got everything replaced and a new bigger hard drive now; everything is golden.

My drive that was dying, magically decided it wanted to cooperate and allowed windows to run chkdsk and fix itself up enough to let me copy all the files off in Windows. Swapped drive letters and Windows is none the wiser. I ended up formatting the bad hard drive and ran chkdsk on it again and it seems to be doing OK. What do y'all do with hard drives that work but you're not comfortable putting data on it alone?

Thinking I want to turn it into a tertiary backup drive. It'll be more convenient to access than my external hard drive, but I won't really care if it goes kaput.

Titor
Aug 26, 2014


cisco privilege posted:

You have a current pending sector count of 234 and 162 uncorrectable HDD sectors. That drive is failing. Backup what you need and RMA or replace it.

I'm curious, how did you exactly find the number count? Did you convert the RAW values? How would I go about finding the detailed numbered information you found?

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


So I am going to be replacing my i7 4790k stock fan cooler with a 212 EVO, but I have never done a replacement before. So I have a couple questions:

-When removing my old cooler, do I just yank it off?
-Is the the thermal paste that is going to be left over on the cpu going to be a problem?
-The 212 comes with a thermal paste applicator, but I have never done that because the intel coolers come with it pre-applied. Is there a particular pattern I should apply it in?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


Titor posted:

I'm curious, how did you exactly find the number count? Did you convert the RAW values? How would I go about finding the detailed numbered information you found?

The raw values are in hexadecimal (base-16). You can convert it with most calculators that support hex (the windows one will do it in programmer mode, just hit the hex radio button and type in EA then hit the dec radio button) or you can do it manually. The rightmost place in base 16 is the one's place and the second is the 16s place (like the rightmost digit in base 10 is the one's place and the next is the tens place). So you've got E 16s and A 1s, (in hexadecimal, numbers above 9 are represented as letters - A (which is 10), B (11), C (12), D (13), E (14), F (15)).

E 16s is 14 * 16 = 224 and A ones is 10 * 1 = 10. Add these up to get 224 + 10 = 234. Most programmers I know who work with hex regularly tend to just convert back and forth with a calculator because as you can see it'll get tedious when you get to the next digit which is the 256s place and beyond.

future ghost
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Bread Liar

Titor posted:

I'm curious, how did you exactly find the number count? Did you convert the RAW values? How would I go about finding the detailed numbered information you found?
Check the column on the far right and convert the RAW values from hex.

Mr. Crow posted:

What do y'all do with hard drives that work but you're not comfortable putting data on it alone?

Thinking I want to turn it into a tertiary backup drive. It'll be more convenient to access than my external hard drive, but I won't really care if it goes kaput.
You can stick it in a USB/ESATA enclosure and use it that way, knowing that it could fail at any moment so you shouldn't trust it at all. Usually I just RMA and/or trash failed drives, although I have a couple old out-of-warranty drives I keep around if I need to hand-ferry a bunch of data somewhere.


Knifegrab posted:

So I am going to be replacing my i7 4790k stock fan cooler with a 212 EVO, but I have never done a replacement before. So I have a couple questions:

-When removing my old cooler, do I just yank it off?
-Is the the thermal paste that is going to be left over on the cpu going to be a problem?
-The 212 comes with a thermal paste applicator, but I have never done that because the intel coolers come with it pre-applied. Is there a particular pattern I should apply it in?
Run the PC for a little bit to warm up the thermal paste, shut it down (turn off switch at PSU), and twist the heatsink until it's removable after freeing the 4 pins on the side.
Clean the CPU and stock heatsink with 90% or higher rubbing alcohol - you can use 75% if you have to, but you'll need to give the CPU more time to dry if you do.

You need thermal paste. If it's not pre-installed on the heatsink, although it should already be there, you will have to apply it. Do not re-use the paste from the stock heatsink. Put a little grain of rice-sized dot on the CPU and it should be fine. You don't need to use too much.

future ghost fucked around with this message at Oct 24, 2014 around 16:05

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Knifegrab posted:

So I am going to be replacing my i7 4790k stock fan cooler with a 212 EVO, but I have never done a replacement before. So I have a couple questions:

-When removing my old cooler, do I just yank it off?
-Is the the thermal paste that is going to be left over on the cpu going to be a problem?
-The 212 comes with a thermal paste applicator, but I have never done that because the intel coolers come with it pre-applied. Is there a particular pattern I should apply it in?

You do yank it off, but not before undoing the locking pins. The locking pins are the most important part. After that, there will just be the residual adhesive effect of the thermal paste holding the cooler down, and you may find that it just comes loose by itself..

The thermal paste left over will be a problem. Always clean off and reapply thermal paste, even if you're just lifting the heatsink for a moment. Best way is with high-purity isopropyl alcohol (90%+) and a microfiber cloth. Second best is high-purity isopropyl alcohol and using some coffee filters for mop-up.

For applying paste, basically do anything that isn't spreading it yourself. Dot in the middle, very thin line down the CPU die, little smiley face - as long as the mounting pressure of the heatsink itself is what spreads the paste and you don't use too much, you'll be fine. Here's a relevant video.

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


Thanks so much guys!

Titor
Aug 26, 2014


Rexxed posted:

The raw values are in hexadecimal (base-16). You can convert it with most calculators that support hex (the windows one will do it in programmer mode, just hit the hex radio button and type in EA then hit the dec radio button) or you can do it manually. The rightmost place in base 16 is the one's place and the second is the 16s place (like the rightmost digit in base 10 is the one's place and the next is the tens place). So you've got E 16s and A 1s, (in hexadecimal, numbers above 9 are represented as letters - A (which is 10), B (11), C (12), D (13), E (14), F (15)).

E 16s is 14 * 16 = 224 and A ones is 10 * 1 = 10. Add these up to get 224 + 10 = 234. Most programmers I know who work with hex regularly tend to just convert back and forth with a calculator because as you can see it'll get tedious when you get to the next digit which is the 256s place and beyond.

This is extremely informative. So if the RAW value of an Uncorrectable Sector Count is 00000000078B, would that mean it's 1931? That's an extremely high number so I'm concerned I might be making a major calculating mistake.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


Titor posted:

This is extremely informative. So if the RAW value of an Uncorrectable Sector Count is 00000000078B, would that mean it's 1931? That's an extremely high number so I'm concerned I might be making a major calculating mistake.

You did the calculation correctly, and the drive with that many bad sectors is falling.

Gromit
Aug 15, 2000

I am an oppressed White Male, Asian women wont serve me! Save me Campbell Newman!!!!!!!


Mr. Crow posted:

What do y'all do with hard drives that work but you're not comfortable putting data on it alone?

Like other people have said, I throw these drives away. For the cost of a hard disk these days I just don't waste time with something I don't trust.

moller
Jan 10, 2007

Swan stole my music and framed me!


Knifegrab posted:

So I am going to be replacing my i7 4790k stock fan cooler with a 212 EVO, but I have never done a replacement before. So I have a couple questions:

-When removing my old cooler, do I just yank it off?
-Is the the thermal paste that is going to be left over on the cpu going to be a problem?
-The 212 comes with a thermal paste applicator, but I have never done that because the intel coolers come with it pre-applied. Is there a particular pattern I should apply it in?

I ended up watching a couple of youtubes of the installation before I put on a 212. The part with the backplate on the other side of the board seemed vague in the printed directions but was simple once I had watched someone else do it first.

Dongattack
Dec 20, 2006

I wish I could be a simpleton.


I'm using my 50" LD tv as a monitor for the time, i did this for a long time in the past also and i had no issues. Back then i used one of those wires with the pin connectors in a rectangle (i don't know the name, i'm sorry).

These days i'm using a HDMI wire and i'm seeing while the resolution says 1920x1080 it is infact 1280x720. Now i googled and it said this could be a thing with HDMI and computer to TV connects. So i was fine with that and started looking for a new wire, but meanwhile i started playing the new Civ game, the one in space and it is 100% in 1920x1080, so the TV CAN display that resolution with the HDMI wire after all. Anyone got a clue with that limited information?

I use a Nvidia GTX 770 and the specific make of the TV i can't remember, sorry, it's a bit old.

JRay88
Jan 4, 2013


I just updated the bios on my motherboard and now I can't get into windows. I get past the bios but windows never starts, it blue screens and then restarts the PC. When it comes back on it says windows shut down improperly blah blah blah. Figured it might be something with my overclock but when I looked the bios update set the board back to default CPU settings. Anyone know what could have happened? Mobo is an msi z97m-g43 and CPU is a g3258. Windows 8 on a 250gb evo 840.

Star War Sex Parrot
Oct 2, 2003



Muldoon

Did your SATA settings change from AHCI to IDE?

JRay88
Jan 4, 2013


Star War Sex Parrot posted:

Did your SATA settings change from AHCI to IDE?

When I checked it was AHCI. I switched it to IDE and now everything works fine... What are the differences between the two and why would this have changed?

Earl of Lavender
Jul 29, 2007

This is not my beautiful house!!

This is not my beautiful wife!!!


Pillbug

JRay88 posted:

When I checked it was AHCI. I switched it to IDE and now everything works fine... What are the differences between the two and why would this have changed?

AHCI and IDE are two different modes of communication between the hard drive and the SATA controller on your motherboard. IDE is the older standard, AHCI the newer. AHCI supports newer features (for instance, native command queueing). Windows was failing to load because, currently, its AHCI driver is disabled. Presumably, Windows was installed with the controller set to IDE mode, so it never bothered to enable it.

If I had to guess as to why, the BIOS upgrade process you performed probably dumped all the saved BIOS configuration, and AHCI may be the new default mode for the SATA controller.

Geemer
Nov 4, 2010

What is it with Japan and ridiculous hair colors?


Buglord

JRay88 posted:

When I checked it was AHCI. I switched it to IDE and now everything works fine... What are the differences between the two and why would this have changed?

IDE is the legacy method of communicating with your hard drive and motherboards can emulate it to support older OSes. AHCI is the modern-day equivalent and brings a bunch of improvements in speed, power handling and TRIM support for SSDs.

Changing to AHCI mode requires some finagling with Windows, but you'll probably see some improvements. And if you have an SSD, it's pretty much a requirement for it to work properly.*

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976 This details the procedure for Windows 7 and also provides an automated fix it utility. Your steps would be to do what is said in this article and then go into the BIOS and change it to AHCI.


*If you have an SSD and it's been running on IDE mode all this time, you might want to back up all data, secure erase it and then restore the data. So it can get back to full speed again.

Viper_3000
Apr 26, 2005

I could give a shit about all that.

Quick question.

I have a Mid-2009 (Core2Duo) MacBook Pro with a SSD that I use for browsing/excel/media consumption. I've noticed that it's gotten warmer than it used to just doing those tasks. I've replaced the fan and cleaned out the dust in the case. I run SMCFanControl and have the fan set to 3000rpm as the default speed. It still seems to be running warm though, the bottom case getting uncomfortable at times.

Would I see any noticeable benefit from pulling it apart and reapplying a more modern TIM between the CPU and Heatsink? I've read about TIM drying out over time and how bad some of the factory jobs are on MBPs, but I'd rather not pull the entire thing apart like that if I'm barking up the wrong tree and won't see a noticeable difference.

future ghost
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Bread Liar

Replacing the TIM should make a noticeable difference to the temperatures and fan speed/volume.

JRay88
Jan 4, 2013


Geemer posted:

IDE is the legacy method of communicating with your hard drive and motherboards can emulate it to support older OSes. AHCI is the modern-day equivalent and brings a bunch of improvements in speed, power handling and TRIM support for SSDs.

Changing to AHCI mode requires some finagling with Windows, but you'll probably see some improvements. And if you have an SSD, it's pretty much a requirement for it to work properly.*

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976 This details the procedure for Windows 7 and also provides an automated fix it utility. Your steps would be to do what is said in this article and then go into the BIOS and change it to AHCI.


*If you have an SSD and it's been running on IDE mode all this time, you might want to back up all data, secure erase it and then restore the data. So it can get back to full speed again.
I'm using windows 8.1 so I don't think that link will help. When I tried googling it all I could come up with was ways to go from AHCI>IDE not the other way around.

I have no clue wether it was in IDE mode all this time or not. Guess I'll just back up, erase, and reinstall. Is there a certain tool I should use to erase it or will just reformatting the drive work?

Main Paineframe
Oct 27, 2010

just can't seem to shoo away that Schumer

Are external USB enclosures for laptop HDs any good, or should I get some kind of adapted to connect them directly? I've got two laptop HDs from dead laptops that I want to pull data off (one about 3 years old, the other about a decade old) and onto a desktop, and an external enclosure would suit my needs except I vaguely recall reading somewhere that they're all barely-functional hot garbage, is that still true?

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Main Paineframe posted:

Are external USB enclosures for laptop HDs any good, or should I get some kind of adapted to connect them directly? I've got two laptop HDs from dead laptops that I want to pull data off (one about 3 years old, the other about a decade old) and onto a desktop, and an external enclosure would suit my needs except I vaguely recall reading somewhere that they're all barely-functional hot garbage, is that still true?

These vary wildly in quality, so stick with better-known brands and models with lots of positive reviews at newegg or amazon.

HappyCapybaraFamily
Sep 16, 2009

It's a beautiful day in GRORIOUS NIPPON

Grimey Drawer

Realized this doesn't fit in this thread.

HappyCapybaraFamily fucked around with this message at Oct 28, 2014 around 02:57

Geemer
Nov 4, 2010

What is it with Japan and ridiculous hair colors?


Buglord

JRay88 posted:

I'm using windows 8.1 so I don't think that link will help. When I tried googling it all I could come up with was ways to go from AHCI>IDE not the other way around.

I have no clue wether it was in IDE mode all this time or not. Guess I'll just back up, erase, and reinstall. Is there a certain tool I should use to erase it or will just reformatting the drive work?

Secure Erase is a special command to tell the SSD to erase all its flash memory and return it to a factory-new like state. Just regular formatting won't be the same.
I'd suggest asking in the SSD Megathread. They'll know which tool can do the trick. If it's a Samsung SSD, they provide a bootable cd image or USB drive image through their Magician software.

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Depends on the format, actually. Within Windows, a Quick Format issues a partition-wide TRIM, which isn't perfect but it's 95% there (it'll leave spare area unTRIMmed. Some SSD tools like Intel SSD Toolbox and Samsung Magician have "issue a free space TRIM" tools. And Windows 8 and 8.1's defragmentation tool will send a free-space TRIM to SSDs.

Geemer
Nov 4, 2010

What is it with Japan and ridiculous hair colors?


Buglord

Factory Factory posted:

Depends on the format, actually. Within Windows, a Quick Format issues a partition-wide TRIM, which isn't perfect but it's 95% there (it'll leave spare area unTRIMmed. Some SSD tools like Intel SSD Toolbox and Samsung Magician have "issue a free space TRIM" tools. And Windows 8 and 8.1's defragmentation tool will send a free-space TRIM to SSDs.

You're right. I forgot about those. But don't some drives also have trouble getting back to full performance without a Secure Erase?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


There's a longstanding bug with Sandforce 2 drives, yeah.

shodanjr_gr
Nov 20, 2007


Are there any pitfalls to avoid when doing RAID0 with SSDs? I've got a machine at work with an LSI 9750-8i RAID controller feeding two Samsung SSDs in stripping mode. Performance is HORRENDOUS even on trivial workloads (we are talking sub-platter disk levels of performance here) and I don't have the first clue about how to debug this. Any ideas?

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

shodanjr_gr posted:

Are there any pitfalls to avoid when doing RAID0 with SSDs? I've got a machine at work with an LSI 9750-8i RAID controller feeding two Samsung SSDs in stripping mode. Performance is HORRENDOUS even on trivial workloads (we are talking sub-platter disk levels of performance here) and I don't have the first clue about how to debug this. Any ideas?
Yes, this is actually a really complicated question, check out the SSD Megathread, or post a thread in the Haus of Tech Support with more details about your configuration, including what drives you're using, what operating system, and what kind of motherboard.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

I, too, have lost a Kingdom.


I managed to kill my old Antec power supply tester today. It was probably close to ten years old by now anyway. Any recommendations or caveats on getting a new one, or just whatever Newegg has that's inexpensive and has the features I want?

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


Kind of a weird question for this thread, but I am looking for a little standalone device that can erase HDD's and SSD's, ideally to the standard military standard. I am aware I can do this in most machines, but it is for a production line and it would be better to have a simple plug and play device to expedite the process.

FCKGW
May 21, 2006

aaaaaaaaaa
AAAAAAAAAAA
HHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!



Knifegrab posted:

Kind of a weird question for this thread, but I am looking for a little standalone device that can erase HDD's and SSD's, ideally to the standard military standard. I am aware I can do this in most machines, but it is for a production line and it would be better to have a simple plug and play device to expedite the process.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wp8sFsriH4c

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007




Hell Gem

Knifegrab posted:

Kind of a weird question for this thread, but I am looking for a little standalone device that can erase HDD's and SSD's, ideally to the standard military standard. I am aware I can do this in most machines, but it is for a production line and it would be better to have a simple plug and play device to expedite the process.

Do you want to re-use the drives after securely erasing them, or is this erasure prior to recycling/disposal for security purposes?

Knifegrab
Jul 30, 2014

Gadzooks! I'm terrified of this little child who is going to stab me with a knife. I must wrest the knife away from his control and therefore gain the upperhand.


^^^ Reuse.


Ha, I wish, that would be satisfying. I actually found one, I have a stupid question though, I know sata cables are the cables are the part that connects to the drive and delivers data, but what are the big blocky cords that deliver power called?

edit: Wait do sata cables deliver power?

edit: Double wait, are esata and sata the same cable?

Knifegrab fucked around with this message at Oct 28, 2014 around 17:52

future ghost
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Bread Liar

Knifegrab posted:

Ha, I wish, that would be satisfying. I actually found one, I have a stupid question though, I know sata cables are the cables are the part that connects to the drive and delivers data, but what are the big blocky cords that deliver power called?

The SATA power connector is on the left. A male 4-pin molex connector (for IDE drives and other peripherals) is on the right. In this case that's a power adapter from 4-pin molex to female SATA. I'm not sure if SATA power connectors have an official name.

quote:

edit: Wait do sata cables deliver power?
ESATA connectors have power outputs connected to standard SATA power pins. You need a SATA power connector connector attached to use a regular SATA drive.

Gromit
Aug 15, 2000

I am an oppressed White Male, Asian women wont serve me! Save me Campbell Newman!!!!!!!


Knifegrab posted:

Kind of a weird question for this thread, but I am looking for a little standalone device that can erase HDD's and SSD's, ideally to the standard military standard. I am aware I can do this in most machines, but it is for a production line and it would be better to have a simple plug and play device to expedite the process.

We've got a bunch of kit that can do this in my office, but the smallest unit is the WiebeTech Drive Erazer Ultra. The only issue I guess is that you can only connect 1 drive to it at a time. What I do like, though, is that the connector for SATA devices is a combo power and data cable, so it's a lot easier to plug new drives in.

I personally use the TD2, as it lets me wipe 2 disks simultaneously, but I use the imaging side of it a lot more so that's why I have that.

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22 Eargesplitten
Oct 10, 2010
I'm conducting an experiment to see if removing your shitty avatar will improve your shitty taste in black metal

Twice in the past week I've had to repair my windows install before it will boot. I'm assuming this means my HDD is on its way out, and considering it's about 10 years old I wouldn't be surprised. What utility should I use to verify that the HDD itself is the issue before I go and buy a new SSD?

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