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  • Locked thread
CloseFriend
Aug 21, 2002

Un malheur ne vient jamais seul.


The television network UPN debuted in 1995. As part of its launch, the network developed four original series that debuted over the course of the year: Star Trek: Voyager, Nowhere Man, Live Shot, and a silly sci-fi show called Deadly Games.



Deadly Games had almost as much Star Trek star-power behind it as Voyager: Leonard Nimoy had an executive producer credit and directed the first episode; Christopher Lloyd had a regular role as the main antagonist; Brent Spiner, LeVar Burton, Dwight Schultz, and Beth Toussaint all guest-starred as villains of the week. Even so, Deadly Games' combination of less-than-stellar ratings and abject stupidity spelled its doom. Indeed, within a year, out of UPN's starting lineup, only Voyager lived to suck another day.

Deadly Games follows the pattern of corny, short-lived, TV-budget sci-fi shows of the 90s, like The Flash and M.A.N.T.I.S. Each week boasts a new villain who menaces the regulars, only to meet defeat via the power of friendship and pseudoscience. The show remains interesting to watch to this day, though, mostly because of its campiness, silliness, complete dearth of understanding of computers, and adorable pre-9/11 naïveté.

The Premise

Shortly before the events of the series, Dr. Gus Lloyd divorced from his wife of three years. By day, Gus works as a grant-funded anti-matter physicist for an LA university. By night, he exorcises his bitterness and latent misogyny by coding a video game based on his life. He recasts himself as "The Cold Steel Kid," an X-TREME 90s action hero, complete with aviator sunglasses and a Springsteen-esque headband. He recasts his ex-wife as a perpetually-powerless damsel in distress. More importantly (and creepily), every single one of the dozens of people who ever wronged him in his life—from a camp counselor who tormented him as a pre-teen to a motivational speaker from whom he bought tapes after his divorce—serves as a level boss. An anti-matter accident somehow reincarnates all of these villains into the real world, where in a manner reminiscent of the Adam West Batman series, each battles Gus and his friends until our heroes can delete the villains by reenacting the demises they met in the game. On that far-off day when the last boss gets deleted, our heroes will face the final boss, Sebastian Jackal (played by Christopher Lloyd in his scenery-chewingest).

The Heroes



James Calvert plays Dr. Gus Lloyd. Calvert's career didn't exactly take off after Deadly Games got shitcanned. IMDb lists his last credit as a defunct short film called Rumpelforeskin.

As the series progresses, we learn that Lloyd coded this game by taking a bunch of photographs of everyone who ever wronged him, scanning them, and modeling them in the game, exaggerating their backstories to make them even more evil. He also makes himself into the knight in shining armor and his independent ex-wife into a dependent dim bulb. The other characters find this far less creepy than you'd expect.

After the game enters the real-world, Gus press-gangs his ex-wife (who had, naturally, long since moved on with her life) and best friend to help him defeat these villains. Neither has a choice, yet neither gets quite as angry with Gus as you'd expect of someone who just got told to put his/her entire life on hold because their creepy friend hosed up. Indeed, in a manner reminiscent of Silver Age Superman, Gus treats his friends like total poo poo and fails to appreciate that he caused the defining problem in their lives. Each week, a villain commits multiple murders and nearly pulls off a mass murder; at no point does Gus feel any responsibility for this. But at the end of each episode, he comes tantalizingly close to having a brief moment where he realizes the level of douchery he has reached and the havoc his selfishness has caused… only to summarily revert right back to his old, rear end in a top hat self. Fortunately, all of this comes off as funny when you don't have to die at the hands of a serial killer he created in a basement.



Cynthia Gibb plays the ex-wife, Lauren Ashborne. Aside from always wearing insane amounts of makeup, Lauren shows a markedly higher level of maturity than Gus, although this tends to go out the window when she finds herself having to work with him. We learn that the villains will only get deleted if Lauren acts out specific roles in each episode that parallel her behavior in the game. For instance, one episode requires her to take the lead; another requires her to tell a joke to distract a villain.

The series opens with Lauren engaged to another man, successful in her journalistic career, and financially well off. Gus re-enters her life and spends the balance of the series systematically ruining all of this. By the time of the show's cancellation, Lauren has irrevocably tanked her career, lost her boyfriend, and spent her extra money saving Gus' rear end. Of course, like any two opposite-sex leads, their relationship gains traction as the series progresses. Lauren deludes herself into thinking she has fallen back in love with Gus while she slides back into the destructive habits that she spent so long overcoming before.



Stephen T. Kay plays Peter Rucker, Gus' best friend and colleague and the only main character not to have a role in the game. This often makes him the "X-factor" in the gang's escapades, since the villains have no way of predicting his behavior. Even so, Peter rarely gets in on the action. He almost never leaves the lab where he and Gus work. He usually serves as the peanut gallery, using his annoying catchphrase, "Am I right or am I right? Don't give me right if I'm not right!"

As with Lauren, Gus routinely treats Peter like poo poo. Gus will constantly order Peter around, and Peter will drop everything with minimal reluctance to act out Gus' orders. The series portrays this as Peter's strength. In fact, Peter only stands up to Gus in one episode, and we learn later that he only did it as a ruse.



Every episode culminates in an attempted terrorist attack that threatens the lives of hundreds—sometimes thousands. But this show debuted in 1995, in those halcyon days before we Lost Our National Innocence on September 11 in the Year of Our Lord 2001. So while we now live in a country where half the citizens see nothing strange about calling in a SWAT team on a $50 drug tip and throwing a grenade in a baby's crib, in the days of Deadly Games, the LAPD palms off the investigation of all these barely-thwarted terrorist attempts on one over-the-hill detective.

Sam McMurray plays that detective, James Dorn. McMurray more-or-less reprises his role from Likely Suspects, where he starred as a bluff but perspicacious hawkshaw who solves cases through a combination of glaring at witnesses and bitching about his ulcer and his ex-wife. In Deadly Games, he shows the potential to become a valuable ally to the main characters, but they try to hamper his investigation any way they can. Even though Detective Dorn comes closer every episode to actually believing the farfetched premise, the protagonists respond with multiple counts of obstruction of justice.

The Villains



Name: Sebastian Jackal
Weapon: Flamethrowing cane
Weakness: Baseball signed by Bobby Mercer

Christopher Lloyd played Sebastian Jackal, the series' main antagonist and the guy whose overacting and scenery-chewing makes the show. We later learn that Gus based Jackal on Gus' world-renowned but emotionally-distant father, Jordan Lloyd. (The show telegraphs this plot twist from a mile away.) Because of the game's setup, the Jackal remains completely invincible throughout the show. Only one thing can harm him—an autographed baseball from Gus' one positive memory of his father. Even then, it can only harm Jackal after Gus deletes every other villain. If Jackal lives, according to Gus, "People will die, cities will burn, and life as we know it will end."

Christopher Lloyd's acting brings out the real fun of the show. He rolls around in a Chrysler convertible that matches his white suit, acting like a cross between Satan and Boss Hogg. He summons and spurs the other villains into action, always delivering smug commentary from the sidelines with champagne in one hand and a cigar in the other. (The show never quite explains how living computer programs can eat, drink, or smoke, but it doesn't explain a lot of things.)



Name: Killshot
Weapon: Exploding footballs
Weakness: Water

Tom Rothman plays the first Villain of the Week, a hydrophobic quarterback who calls himself "Killshot." Gus based Killshot on Tom Rathman, (Get it?) a jock who bullied him in high school. Killshot broke his right leg and it never healed properly, so he menaces the characters by limping around throwing exploding footballs. Killshot makes for a wonderful symbol of Gus' total inability to let go of the past, making a villain out of a high school bully.



Name: Evil Shirley
Weapon: Ice balls
Weakness: Dirt

Even during Gus' and Lauren's marriage, Lauren's officious, disapproving mother cast a shadow over their ever-attenuating relationship. Gus retaliates by recasting her as a witch, an icy virago who freezes to death anyone who doesn't meet her standards. Shirley Jones plays both Evil Shirley and the "real" Shirley Ashborne, who has mellowed and plans to remarry. (Interestingly, Shirley Jones' real-life husband Marty Ingels plays Shirley Ashborne's new suitor; their characters on the show parallel their real-life personalities. In fact, Jones and Ingels once wrote a book about their unlikely marriage.)



Name: The Boss
Weapon: Pink slips
Weakness: Red ink

Gus took out his anger at middle management by recasting his tyrannical quondam supervisor, Mr. Metcalf, as "The Boss." Mr. Metcalf wears a Power Glove (or at least it looks like one) that fires pink slips that immolate their targets. Naturally, he prefaces his executions by coldly uttering, "You're fired." For his first target, Mr. Metcalf fires a pre-fame Jeremy Renner (who still looks drunk even at this early stage in his career). If you want to see Jeremy Renner literally go up in flames—or see people get "fired" in a manner considerably more entertaining than on The Apprentice, you have to watch this episode.



Name: The Camp Counselor
Weapon: Swiss Army Taser
Weakness: Arrows; Charcoal dipped in lighter fluid

Anthony Michael Hall plays Chuck Manley, the evil Camp Counselor. Manley earned Gus' eternal enmity when Gus spent a week at Camp Chatooga at age 11. Manley tied Gus' retainer to a toy rocket and fired it into space, ruining Gus' prospects with a girl and leaving Gus in need of orthodontia. (The process of getting braces would then traumatize Gus into making two more villains.)

Manley got the only two-parter of the series. He worked a long con on Gus. He started by bringing to life Amber (played by Kathy Ireland), Gus' masculist conception of "the perfect woman," a fawning, importunate, ditzy bimbo whose concupiscence impairs his productivity and his budding relationship with Lauren. He then steals Lauren's and Gus' identities, draining their bank accounts. Just when it looks like he's lost, Chuck kidnaps Lauren into the game, forcing Peter and Gus to resurrect him to fight him anew.

Hall seems to really "get" the campiness of the camp counselor role, making him one of the more fun villains of the week. He plays Manley a bit like Ug from Salute Your Shorts with his authoritarianism run amok.



Name: The Practical Joker
Weapon: Laser joy buzzer
Weakness: The Eject button

Gus has a friend named Danny Schlecht who loves to play pranks on people. But his pranks have a way of going a little further than what one would consider "healthy" or "legal"; at one point, he mailed Gus' car keys to Iraq! Before the events of the show, Gus left Danny in a room alone with his game, which gave Danny enough time to code in a hidden boss: himself. Danny Schlect's alter-ego serves as the token Joker knockoff. For his main weapon, he uses a joy buzzer that can vaporize his opponents a mile away. He ultimately makes the fatal mistake of pissing off Jackal, who doesn't want anybody else killing his Kid.

As someone who grew up on Star Trek TNG, I loved Spiner in this role. He plays the opposite of Data, showing an wide range of emotion that he'd had to keep bottled up for seven long seasons. Like the other villains, Spiner embraces the silliness and runs with it, making him probably the best of the villains of the week.



Name: The Car Mechanic
Weapon: Heart-attack-inducing calculator
Weakness: Brake fluid; his reflection

When his first car had brake problems, a teenage Gus took it to a mechanic by the name of Ross Logan (Mark Pellegrino, also known as the rear end in a top hat ex-husband in Dexter). Logan charged him bank for the repairs… which it turns out Logan never actually did. This earned him his own slot on Gus' List of Impotent Rage. Like all mechanics, Logan charges a fee for his services that would give anyone a heart attack. But according to Gus, his duplicity has given him a level of deep-seated guilt such that having to face himself in a mirror would kill him. Unfortunately, Ross Logan somehow proves adept at knowing someone has a mirror without looking at it. He embarks on a successful car-part stealing spree that he somehow pulls off without ever once seeing what he looks like.



Name: The Divorce Lawyer
Weapon: 10,000 volts
Weakness: Nerf darts; Billy Joel's The Stranger (no, really)

Victoria Rowell plays Courtney Lake, a "high-powered" attorney who plans to electrocute SCOTUS. Lake serves as the series' answer to electrified villains like Electro, the Shocker, or Livewire. Gus and Lauren have to fly to Washington DC to stop her. While there, Gus takes time out to ruin Lauren's entire journalistic career and get Lauren thrown in the pokey. Of course, Lauren forgives Gus by the end of the episode, leaving a smarter viewer to wish Lake had just killed our heroes and gotten her own show.



Name: The Motivational Speaker
Weapon: Walkman that records and fires flesh-eating cassette tape
Weakness: His own words

Dwight Schultz evokes Howling Mad Murdock when he plays Nathan Abrams (whom the credits call "Nathan Adler" in a display of high production values), a tolutiloquent huckster who sells self-help cassette tapes for $99.99. Unlike the other villains, Abrams comes with a weakness: he has to continuously eat bologna to live. As a real-life hardcore Republican, Schultz fits in perfectly with the distinctly right-wing flavor of the show's writing. His character kills with blandishments about self-empowerment. His episode stands out as the only one where we see actual tension between Gus and his usually-obedient sidekick, Peter. After the perfunctory fence-mending, the third act shifts into a New Year's Eve episode with one of the weirder terrorist plots of the series.



Name: The Trash Man
Weapon: Superhuman strength; Toxic waste; Gun that turns people into (bagged) garbage
Weakness: Cleaning supplies

If you reach this far in the series (or this post), you'll have noticed that Gus projects like IMAX. He blames his divorce on literally everyone he can find except himself. This even includes the Roy Hopkins, the garbage man who discarded Lauren's wedding ring and refused to allow Gus to retrieve it. Of course, despite Gus' self-absorbed, feckless, aloof demeanor, their marriage would totally have survived if not for that one wedding ring incident, so the trash man had to become a bad guy.

Mike Starr, of course, has no shortage of experience playing heavies, and this role feels much like his role in The Last Dragon. Right around this point in the series, the low budget really starts to show, as you'll realize when you find yourself watching a car chase down a deserted back road between a beat-up jalopy from the 70s and a "radioactive" garbage truck where the climax involves a horseshoe and a piece of plywood.



Name: Dr. Kramer
Weapon: Dental drill; laughing gas
Weakness: Sugar; drill bits

Gus considers getting braces another of the great humiliations of his long, martyr-complex-benighted life. As such, he had to make a villain out of evil orthodontist Dr. Kramer. Because Gus doesn't understand the difference between orthodontists and dentists, Dr. Kramer's MO consists of attacking with a drill that shoots and/or rips out fillings. Christopher Neame plays him. Neame takes advantage of his resemblance to Frank Gorshin and Anthony Hopkins, creating a villain consisting of equal parts Hannibal Lecter and the Riddler. The episode's plot even parallels a similar one in the 1966 Batman series; Dr. Kramer plans to pull off a mass murder using nitrous oxide. Unlike all the other villains, though, Kramer has a backup plan…



Name: Sharon the Hygienist
Weapon: Dental drill; laughing gas
Weakness: Sugar; drill bits

Gus hated his orthodontic experience so much he made two villains from the experience. Dental hygienist Sharon has her boss' personality and MO in a distaff form, programmed to arise in the event of her boss' deletion. Marjorie Monaghan—who has made a career out of working the TV sci-fi circuit—plays this evil filler of dental caries.


In the never-aired season finale, Beth Toussaint plays Belinda, a leather-clad misandrist based on Gus' ex-girlfriend. Gus can only defeat her with a golden ball. Unfortunately, because this ep never aired (Wikipedia says it did in 1997, but I couldn't find any corroborating evidence), we'll never know how Ishara Yar as a dominatrix could have posed a threat to our heroes or why the gently caress a golden ball could kill her.

The show also features brief appearances from a number of minor villains who unfortunately don't get to menace Gus on-screen: a blind woman with a seeing-eye dog; a gym teacher; a Benihana chef; a "sociopathic" college roommate; a loan officer; a landlord; a cop. Sadly, the show leaves the viewer to wonder what a blind woman or a sushi chef could possibly have done to contribute to Gus' all-consuming persecution complex.

Why I Posted This

So you can watch it and we can talk about it! The show will probably never, ever come to DVD (and it would surprise me to ever see it broadcast again), so you can indulge my desire to have you watch the entire aired series on YouTube…

Episode 1: Killshot
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 2: One Mean Mother
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 3: The Boss
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 4: The End of the Jackal (probably the season finale; UPN aired the episodes out of order)
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 5: The Camp Counselor (part 1)
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 6: The Camp Counselor (part 2)
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 7: The Practical Joker
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 8: The Car Mechanic
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 9: The Divorce Lawyer (probably aired later than intended)
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 10: The Motivational Speaker
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 11: The Trash Man
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Episode 12: Dr. Kramer
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4 (cuts out early)

Why You Should Watch This

Personally, I have fond memories of watching this as a kid, even though I knew (even at age 12) it'd get shitcanned before long (especially since then-new network UPN put it up against Roseanne). I figured some of you might feel this way as well. I, for one, always look for a good opportunity to tarnish and lay waste to childhood memories. (Ask me about watching all of M.A.N.T.I.S. as an adult!!)

Even if you don't have the nostalgia factor, I love this show as a spiritual 90s-ization of campy superhero TV and silly Silver Age comics. The humor vacillates between intentional knowing-winks and unintentional stupidity, peppered with risible characterization and a Weird Science level of computer literacy. Also, Christopher Lloyd chews scenery on a scale you would not believe. He plays a textbook badguy from the Snidely Whiplash playbook to the hilt, enjoying every minute of it.

Also, this show will take all of nine hours to watch all the way through and you will have a great time. So watch it and then join me in laughing at it!

CloseFriend fucked around with this message at Oct 5, 2014 around 03:33

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X-O
Apr 28, 2002

Long Live The King!



I have heard of this and watched bits and pieces but never knew the entire show was available. This is definitely going on my must watch list as I've heard amazing things.

X-O
Apr 28, 2002

Long Live The King!



I'm halfway through part two of the first episode. This is the greatest TV show of all time.

Sticking this thread forever.

BSam
Nov 24, 2012



This show is loving amazing.

whowhatwhere
Mar 15, 2010


My only problem is that the thread title should have been "Hold on to your joysticks!"

Lumberjack Bonanza
Feb 27, 2011

I'm turning you into a snail because I'm racist.


I've seen a lot of shows that don't understand how video games work but it's actually a foreign concept for this one.

It loving rules.

try the new taco place
Jan 4, 2004

hey mister... can u play drums while I sing and play plastic guitar???


I can't understand how we're supposed to like this guy. He's one of the worst protagonists... and even one of the worst people I've ever seen.

Lycus
Aug 5, 2008

Half the posters in this forum have been made up. This website is a goddamn ghost town.

Oh poo poo I think I have vague memories of this. Specifically it was Killshot that jogged my memory.

BSam
Nov 24, 2012



I watched the first three episodes today. I have no idea how this show got made in the first place. Also, I have no idea how anyone who saw this show once it was made didn't do their utmost to make sure it continued to be made.

Lumberjack Bonanza
Feb 27, 2011

I'm turning you into a snail because I'm racist.


"Why is everyone telling me to let things go?" - The man who made a video game about all of the people who screwed with him in order to enact the pettiest of revenges.

Really wish we found out how the benihana dude hosed him over.

Edit: Tough luck kid tough luck kid.

Double Edit: HOW DID A BRUTE FORCE PROGRAM NOT FIGURE OUT A THREE LETTER PASSWORD IN TEN loving SECONDS HOLY poo poo

Triple Edit: Super shocked they knew that deleting files does not actually delete data until the old data is overwritten.

Lumberjack Bonanza fucked around with this message at Oct 5, 2014 around 11:16

johntfs
Jun 7, 2013

by Cowcaster


Soiled Meat

I remember watching this show initially because I confused the actress playing the girlfriend with another actress. I thought I was following Cynthia Geary from Northern Exposure and instead it was Cynthia Gibb.

muscles like this!
Jan 17, 2005



In a world of flimsy TV premises this is definitely the flimsiest.

Irish Joe
Jul 23, 2007

by Lowtax


BSam posted:

Also, I have no idea how anyone who saw this show once it was made didn't do their utmost to make sure it continued to be made.

I was in middle school and the only people in the Prodigy chat room were old men looking to cyber.

Lycus
Aug 5, 2008

Half the posters in this forum have been made up. This website is a goddamn ghost town.

I like how after "Killshot", he completely gave up on creating "cool" villain names.

TheRationalRedditor
Jul 17, 2000

WHO ABUSED HIM. WHO ABUSED THE BOY.


Why didn't that dingus just create a playlist of this entire series in order the way it was MEANT to be seen!

BSam
Nov 24, 2012



TheRationalRedditor posted:

Why didn't that dingus just create a playlist of this entire series in order the way it was MEANT to be seen!

I KNOW RIGHT!

Lycus
Aug 5, 2008

Half the posters in this forum have been made up. This website is a goddamn ghost town.

Apparently one of creators of this show sued ABC a couple times for stealing the idea for Lost from him.

Lumberjack Bonanza
Feb 27, 2011

I'm turning you into a snail because I'm racist.


Lycus posted:

Apparently one of creators of this show sued ABC a couple times for stealing the idea for Lost from him.

The dude invented Killshot and they decided to steal Lost instead? Not loving likely.

Kuso Meriken
Jun 30, 2007


Haven't thought about this show in years. I was so into it I recorded them on VHS and rewatched over and over again, but those are long gone. I used to imagine my own version of the game and cast people and other kids I knew as characters. Such innocent times.

Thank you for reminding me of this beautiful gem.

DaveWoo
Aug 14, 2004



Fun Shoe

Lycus posted:

Apparently one of creators of this show sued ABC a couple times for stealing the idea for Lost from him.

Well, he's got a point. I mean, look, there's Jacob right there!

ComposerGuy
Jul 28, 2007

And I Helped!


Oh my god, I haven't thought about this show in probably over a decade. 12-year-old me was so intrigued by this premise. "Why, I like video games...you're telling me this is a show about a video game that comes to life? HOLY poo poo!"

Also, Christopher Lloyd doesn't "make" this show, he IS this show. Every episode needed at least twice as much of him.

TOILETLORD
Nov 13, 2012

by XyloJW


Oh, man i remember watching this. All i remember is the guy being forced to eat his own tape, and the dude that shoots pink slips.

business hammocks
Aug 20, 2006



Broken Cake

I can remember loving the episode with Brent Spiner. It blew my 13-year-old mind to see the premise of a formulaic tv show subverted even slightly. I remember thinking even at the time that the main character was a huge rear end in a top hat to his sidekick buddy.

I haven't thought about this show in at least 20 years. This, Maverick, and the Paranormal Borderline pretty much sum up my love affair with UPN.

Somebody try to find some Paranormal Borderlines. Jonathan Frakes hosts it years before Fact or Fiction: Beyond Belief.

CaptainHollywood
Feb 29, 2008


I am an awesome guy and I love to make out during shitty Hollywood horror movies. I am a trendwhore!


I keep thinking of an age I would have thought this was cool. Gonna say 13. By age 16 I was into 24 and thought that was the best show ever.

TOILETLORD
Nov 13, 2012

by XyloJW


CaptainHollywood posted:

I keep thinking of an age I would have thought this was cool. Gonna say 13. By age 16 I was into 24 and thought that was the best show ever.

I was eleven at the time i thought it was cool for 5 episodes.

VBane
Oct 31, 2011


Thank you so much for making this thread, I thought I was the only one that remembered this show.

BuckarooBanzai
Dec 2, 2004

Wherever you go, there you are.

Slippery Tilde

This is incredible.

PotatoJudge
May 22, 2004

Tell me about the rabbits, George

UPN aired some of the most hilariously bad shows ever. Outside of Veronica Mars and a few sitcoms from when they tried to corner the urban market their schedule was one train wreck after another.

Platypus Man
Homeboys from Outerspace (They flew around in a space hoopty!)
The Secret Diaries of Desmond Pfeiffer
Shasta McNasty (starring Jake Busey AND Verne Troyer!)

Otto von Ruthless
Oct 1, 2014


PotatoJudge posted:

The Secret Diaries of Desmond Pfeiffer

I always forget this was a real show because the first time I heard of it was the Clerks cartoon and it's just too ridiculous to actually exist.

Otto von Ruthless fucked around with this message at Oct 18, 2014 around 03:41

Nebakenezzer
Sep 13, 2005

The Mote in God's Eye



I have no memory of this show at all, but am so very glad I clicked on this thread.

I'm 7:30 in to the first episode and our hero has uttered the line "what do you think of this density, Dad" with total sincerity.

e: "I don't know how you do it, honey. Great cook, career woman...sexual gymnast." Cut to: that guy's mom, sitting right next to him

Nebakenezzer fucked around with this message at Oct 20, 2014 around 01:56

precision
May 7, 2006

Gonna have me some good friends around
Gonna have me some good times in town


PotatoJudge posted:

Shasta McNasty (starring Jake Busey AND Verne Troyer!)

I'm watching this on YouTube and it is the most hilarious loving thing I have ever seen.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0Yj1r6Bz3M

e: it's like New Girl as written by a juggalo

precision fucked around with this message at Oct 21, 2014 around 05:27

Celery Jello
Mar 21, 2005


Slippery Tilde

Behold! The only sitcom in history that actually would be improved by a laugh track!

Tighclops
Jan 23, 2008

PARTY ON, GARTH OF IZAR


CloseFriend posted:

we'll never know ... Ishara Yar as a dominatrix

I am angry that this was filmed and I never got to see it. Angry.

Nebakenezzer
Sep 13, 2005

The Mote in God's Eye



Friends: I was so amazed by the first episode I actually forgot it didn't have a opening.

Here it is at the start of episode 2

Music: Generic "Rock Bar" music from a 3d Shooter
Images: a feverish dream you have after being sick with the flu all day and you watched too much TV

FilthyImp
Sep 30, 2002


I recall UPN promoting a Very Special episode where *surprise* the main character re bites with his father and its all hugs.

Was that an ending, or kind of a way to say 'yeah this shitheap isn't getting renewed but here's an end to that obvious thread'???

Fister Roboto
Feb 21, 2008

Fully functional and programmed in multiple techniques.

CaptainHollywood posted:

I keep thinking of an age I would have thought this was cool. Gonna say 13. By age 16 I was into 24 and thought that was the best show ever.

I was 12 when this show was on the air, and I thought it was the coolest thing ever, so I think that's pretty strong evidence for the "everything is awesome when you're 12" theory.

oh my god it's so bad

oh god

oh god

ultrabindu
Jan 28, 2009


How do you guys find out about this stuff?
Seriously, does this stuff ever get repeated on TV or do you have to go on the televisual equivalent of dumpster diving?

precision
May 7, 2006

Gonna have me some good friends around
Gonna have me some good times in town


ultrabindu posted:

How do you guys find out about this stuff?
Seriously, does this stuff ever get repeated on TV or do you have to go on the televisual equivalent of dumpster diving?

Add equal parts insomnia, YouTube and alcohol and you never know what you'll find.

What I want to know is: who are the people that still have VHS tapes of these shows and upload them

VBane
Oct 31, 2011


ultrabindu posted:

How do you guys find out about this stuff?
Seriously, does this stuff ever get repeated on TV or do you have to go on the televisual equivalent of dumpster diving?

Some of us watched it all when it was actually on and remember it fondly. Of course looking back years later gives a new perspective :p

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FilthyImp
Sep 30, 2002


precision posted:

What I want to know is: who are the people that still have VHS tapes of these shows and upload them
I would put money on "Now that I have an apartment/home/etc I can look through all the crap I had at my parents' house! Hey look, my VHS copies of Harsh Realm. I wonder if it's still good..."

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