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Man_of_Teflon
Aug 15, 2003



Minus Pants posted:

What's the best way to learn to sail if you don't know anyone already into it? I've taken a 1 hour crash-course and read some books, but I'm not sure where to go from here. ASA 101/103? Private lessons? Any suggestions for where to take them? I'm in Chicago, but it would be nice to get something in this winter (obviously somewhere warmer).

Join Sail Chicago (https://www.sailchicago.org). I've been a member for a couple years now, and it's a great way to learn and have cheap access to boats. I didn't know jack about sailing when I joined and I just got certified as a skipper at the end of this summer.

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Minus Pants
Jul 18, 2004


SuperDucky posted:

In Chicago, give the match racing center a call.

Thanks! I'll check them out.

Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



Ola posted:

Lovely! The Baltic sea is quite brackish, isn't it? At least I know shipwrecks are very well preserved there
Yep. The baltic sea is great if you're into wreck diving. On the downside, visibility is poo poo.

Asshole Bicycle
Nov 4, 2007




I have a 15' fiberglass canoe I got for $200. I use it to go fishing with my girlfriend.




Asshole Bicycle fucked around with this message at 04:39 on Nov 21, 2014

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



drat, those boats are huge.

Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

I got a SOCOM scout and twenty extra mags
And a couple severed heads in my bug-out bag






So are those pics, you should really [timg] them instead!

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


Don't [timg], add the letter 'l' before the final dot. e.g.

http://i.imgur.com/adFqjF3.jpg

becomes

http://i.imgur.com/adFqjF3l.jpg

Like so:

TheNakedJimbo
Nov 18, 2004

If you die first, I am definitely going to eat you. The question is, if I die first...what are YOU gonna do?

I met a guy named Eric Sponberg at a book fair recently; his wife is an author and he designs sailboats and powered yachts for a living. Unfortunately he's a much better boat architect than webpage architect, so the page is a little bit of a mess, but it's still incredibly fascinating. He has long writeups for each boat that he's designed, including blueprints, explanations of why he made each design decision the way he did, photos of the construction, and the like.

There's another section of his page called "Forensic Naval Architecture," where he talks about his experience as an expert witness in nautical lawsuits.

http://www.sponbergyachtdesign.com/

Neslepaks
Sep 3, 2003



Yay, new boat thread. If you remember me posting (and complaining) about my old boat in the old thread, I've replaced it with a nicer one.



Same sort of size and vintage, but in much better shape. She also has a more desirable semi-displacement hull and a newer, bigger engine. I have various small projects I can post more about in the spring, for now she's all tarped up and braced for winter.

Kenshin
Jan 10, 2007


That's a beautiful cabin cruiser. I'm guessing you use it for multi-day trips during the summer?

How many does it sleep, and does it have a galley & refrigerator and all?

Neslepaks
Sep 3, 2003



Kenshin posted:

That's a beautiful cabin cruiser. I'm guessing you use it for multi-day trips during the summer?

How many does it sleep, and does it have a galley & refrigerator and all?

Yeah, it's a classic Norwegian holiday boat. It's got all the amenities you can reasonably expect from such a small (24 ft) boat: hot and cold water, electric toilet, an outdoor shower, a two-burner alcohol stove, diesel heater. No fridge, but an ice box. It keeps cool for about 3 days when I fill it with ice.

The interior converts into a large double bed, while the backrests can lift up and attach to the roof with straps to make two additional small beds for children. Cramped but cozy.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


You guys like boats? I love boats! Especially commercial shipping.

My office overlooks the Chicago River, one of the only waterways connecting the great lakes with the Mississippi River. When I'm not busy doing my job, I like to take pictures of barges as they go past (I'm also fascinated by the draw bridges when they open for the sailboat migrations). I run http://chicagoriverbargetraffic.tumblr.com/ .

Some of my favorites:


The sailboats are waiting for the Roosevelt St. Bridge to open. They're heading inland for the winter. The barge is almost certainly taking dirt to the construction site where they're expanding the Chicago Riverwalk.


Tug pushing three wooden "houses" into town for the Chicago Fire Festival. It was a bit of a boondoggle, as they let the houses sit out in the rain before they tried burning them down.


A few days later, going back downriver. A coworker commented, "I heard there were spectacular technical difficulties."


Empty barge heading downriver. Again, almost certainly related to the riverwalk construction project.


It's adorable!

BrokenKnucklez
Apr 22, 2008

by zen death robot


I love the photos!

I wish I had photos of when my great grand mother lived in her apartment on Staten Island. You could see all the ships coming in and out of the harbor.

Just curious to the people who spend time on the ocean. What is the "ideal" sized sail boat for living and being on the ocean? One of my end goals is to buy a sail boat after I retire and just spend the rest of my life putting around the Caribbean.

Kenshin
Jan 10, 2007


BrokenKnucklez posted:

Just curious to the people who spend time on the ocean. What is the "ideal" sized sail boat for living and being on the ocean? One of my end goals is to buy a sail boat after I retire and just spend the rest of my life putting around the Caribbean.
Those are two very different questions--running around the Caribbean is very different from cross-ocean sailing. That said, it depends on what you're comfortable with. You could technically sail around a well-equipped 25' boat but it would be cramped and the amenities would be few. It also will matter if you're planning to single-hand it or have a partner with you. The older and/or larger a sailboat is usually the harder it will be to single-hand. You'd probably be quite happy in a ~35' boat, monohull or multihull, but if you're going to single-hand it, it would need to be newer and have a fair bit of automation (or older and have a lot of newer equipment retrofitted on to it)

My plan is similar but I'm planning to circumnavigate as well and often have multiple guests on board for several weeks at a time, so I'll be going for a 38-50' catamaran.

Kenshin fucked around with this message at 16:39 on Nov 25, 2014

BrokenKnucklez
Apr 22, 2008

by zen death robot


Most likely at that time in my life it would just be me, the wife, maybe a cat? Maybe an odd guest or two.

I dont think I have any desire to head from north america to europe, but it would be nice to have something I can tool up and down the coast of north and south america if I felt like it.

EAB
Jan 18, 2011


My dream is to get a 40-ish foot cruising catamaran and just go on a bunch of adventures. I like the idea of the catamaran because of all the space they can have, the speed for the amount of space, and the fact they can go in shallower water which would be dope for island hopping. I know it will be expensive as hell, but I finally got a really good job, so who knows, maybe in 5 years...

If not that, I would really like a Baba 30, I've never been in one but I like the design/interior, and they seem to get legendary reviews.

Baba 30 with tanbark sails... sorry for posting pornography



Oh yeah... I don't really have any sailing experience. Do you just read books or do you need to go to a school? Do you need to be certified for certain boat sizes and types and what not?

Kenshin
Jan 10, 2007


EAB posted:

Oh yeah... I don't really have any sailing experience. Do you just read books or do you need to go to a school? Do you need to be certified for certain boat sizes and types and what not?
Not from a legal standpoint for private boats (aside from boating licenses in some places, the Washington State one is basically passing a simple online test and also having a driver's license and they send you a boating permit card).

If you ever want to rent/charter sailboats though they'll require some certifications. Your basic day-sailing certs are ASA 101 and 103. 104 is for multi-day chartering trips (where you are captain of the boat), and 114 is lots of specific stuff on catamarans. I'd highly recommend at least doing those four. They are all on-the-water classes that also have written exams and books to study.

Even if you just want your own boat it's probably a good idea to do classes. That said there is the (relatively) famous experience of the couple who circumnavigated on "Bumfuzzle", a ~40ft catamaran, back in the mid 2000s, who took the first day of their ASA 101 class, decided they didn't like taking classes, and then just went sailing. They made it, though as I read through their blog even near the end of their trip around the world 2-handing their boat they were still doing things that made me facepalm because I'd learned those things in my classes and they didn't do them while sailing around the world.

Kenshin fucked around with this message at 18:54 on Nov 25, 2014

Prince John
Jun 19, 2006

Oh, poppycock! Female bandits?



Since this is the nautical insanity thread, this has always boggled my mind:



I can't imagine how it ever stops or turns corners...

EAB
Jan 18, 2011


Kenshin posted:

Not from a legal standpoint for private boats (aside from boating licenses in some places, the Washington State one is basically passing a simple online test and also having a driver's license and they send you a boating permit card).

If you ever want to rent/charter sailboats though they'll require some certifications. Your basic day-sailing certs are ASA 101 and 103. 104 is for multi-day chartering trips (where you are captain of the boat), and 114 is lots of specific stuff on catamarans. I'd highly recommend at least doing those four. They are all on-the-water classes that also have written exams and books to study.

Even if you just want your own boat it's probably a good idea to do classes. That said there is the (relatively) famous experience of the couple who circumnavigated on "Bumfuzzle", a ~40ft catamaran, back in the mid 2000s, who took the first day of their ASA 101 class, decided they didn't like taking classes, and then just went sailing. They made it, though as I read through their blog even near the end of their trip around the world 2-handing their boat they were still doing things that made me facepalm because I'd learned those things in my classes and they didn't do them while sailing around the world.


Man, some of these courses for the ASA 101/103/104 look like awesome vacations in themselves.

Alctel
Jan 16, 2004

I love snails




Finally got the replacement part for my barometric damper



Now if it'd just stop loving raining so I can bore a huge hole in my roof

Kenshin
Jan 10, 2007


EAB posted:

Man, some of these courses for the ASA 101/103/104 look like awesome vacations in themselves.

They are. I got my ASA 104 and 114 at the same time this past May doing a week-long sailing trip in the Sea of Cortez, out of La Paz, Mexico, ending up near Loretto, Mexico. It was one of the best trips of my life. A few of the people on the trip were getting their 103 and 104. It was just 5 students (myself, two couples in their 40s) our instructor (the owner of Puget Sound Sailing Institute, Mike Rice who is also on the Board of Standards for the ASA), and the amazing elderly couple who owned the catamaran, a beautiful 44 footer.

EDIT: here's a shot from the trip when I climbed up a ridge on an uninhabited desert island:


We'd anchored in the bay to the right (out of frame, across the salt flat) and all these other boats had anchored in this bay. We made the correct choice because the wind was howling all night and we were in the bay protected from the wind and waves, all these boats you see in the picture got tossed around pretty bad.

Kenshin fucked around with this message at 21:26 on Nov 25, 2014

Rime
Nov 2, 2011


BrokenKnucklez posted:

Just curious to the people who spend time on the ocean. What is the "ideal" sized sail boat for living and being on the ocean? One of my end goals is to buy a sail boat after I retire and just spend the rest of my life putting around the Caribbean.

It is not the size, but the design, and indeed the smaller the boat the easier it is. Boats also get exponentially more expensive to moor once you cross 30'. Can you singlehand it? Are the lines lead aft, or to the mast? What is the AVS rating? How is stowage, both for gear and rations? Is the layout appropriate for changing watches? How much water does the cockpit ship? Are the decks wide enough for comfort?

http://bluewaterboats.org/ lists many a gorgeous vessel capable of a cruise lasting years. Many of them were limited production, and are still commanding a premium after nearly fifty years.

Myself, one day I fully intend to live and circumnavigate on a Nor'Sea 27, one of the most capable, comfortable, and seaworthy pocket cruisers ever built:

Bibendum
Sep 5, 2003
nunc est Bibendum

Not only moorage but also maintenance go up exponentially with size; rigging and hardware for a 30 foot boat will be a tenth the cost of the same on a 60 foot boat. If you want to have family or guests aboard a center cockpit layout gives some private space at the stern which is also the most comfortable area to ride in weather. I think I would be really happy with a 35' Catamaran but I am still getting used to the aesthetics. Living in the Northwest it is really nice to have a pilothouse design too, the first few hours of sitting out in the drizzle at the helm are invigorating but the next 500 would be torturous.

right now some of my favorite designs are:
Fisher 25

Lord Nelson Victory Tug

and a bunch of Michael Kasten's Designs, like this one

BrokenKnucklez
Apr 22, 2008

by zen death robot


I would think that just 2 people any thing under 30' would be more than adequate.

But fresh water capacity and storage would be my bigger concern.

Kenshin
Jan 10, 2007


Yeah, a large chunk of catamaran designs have the cockpit open or with a limited bimini. I strongly prefer the designs with full covered cockpits with 360 (or near) visibility.

Kenshin
Jan 10, 2007


BrokenKnucklez posted:

But fresh water capacity and storage would be my bigger concern.
It's a valid concern but not as much as you'd think (for water; storage for spare parts is another issue altogether and another reason I prefer cats since they've got a lot more storage space than a monohull of similar length)

Also, modern water-makers are pretty great. We had one on the catamaran in Mexico and even with 8 people on the boat we only topped the tanks off at a dock once the entire trip and we hadn't been frugal at all.

Rime
Nov 2, 2011


Kenshin posted:


Also, modern water-makers are pretty great. We had one on the catamaran in Mexico and even with 8 people on the boat we only topped the tanks off at a dock once the entire trip and we hadn't been frugal at all.

Lawd are they ever expensive though, over $5k (more for tropical) for a Katadyn and the cost of replacement parts don't soften the blow.

Looking around for a while I've discovered that its best not to kit out a boat yourself, instead find someone who's done all that and run out of cash and ride on their misfortune to save your own bank account.

Kenshin
Jan 10, 2007


Rime posted:

Lawd are they ever expensive though, over $5k (more for tropical) for a Katadyn and the cost of replacement parts don't soften the blow.

Looking around for a while I've discovered that its best not to kit out a boat yourself, instead find someone who's done all that and run out of cash and ride on their misfortune to save your own bank account.

It's the same as a sports car, find a rich person who has upgraded and buy their awesome boat.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!


BrokenKnucklez posted:

I would think that just 2 people any thing under 30' would be more than adequate.

But fresh water capacity and storage would be my bigger concern.

When I was a younger man I'd sail with friends up and down the coast out of Santa Monica all the time in a Pearson 33-4. It was fine for 4 people for about a week at a time - you had to be inventive with water storage, but it wasn't a big deal. Also the chemical toilet wasn't really up to that duty but when you have water all around you that's not such a big deal.

These days my dream is to get a 35 to 40 foot or so trawler type motor yacht or converted fishing boat in another few years (or decades) when I'm well heeled enough to afford the permanent slip space. Nothing serious blue water, but enough to get up and down the West Coast, or even go through Panama and around to the East if I wanted.

INCHI DICKARI
Aug 23, 2006

by FactsAreUseless


I'm dissapointed in the lack of information on the Chevy 305 in the OP

Alctel
Jan 16, 2004

I love snails




I live on a 36 foot monohull, its an older sailboat and they don't have as much room as some of the newer ones

I think I could live on a ~30 footer pretty happily - the things that would suck would be less water/gas storage, and less space for the roughly 3 billion tools I seem to have collected.

I've been buying them as I need them as well, so it's not like I have anything I don't need

Alctel fucked around with this message at 05:16 on Nov 26, 2014

Alctel
Jan 16, 2004

I love snails




Picked up a Scotty 1106 downrigger today for $499 inc tax

Hell yeah! Chinook, Imma coming for you...

I am mildly worried I'm running out of space on my electrical panel though, esp since I still need to install a radar system and AIS (but I think that will run on the same circuit as my VHF radio)

INCHI DICKARI
Aug 23, 2006

by FactsAreUseless


Edit wrong thread

INCHI DICKARI fucked around with this message at 00:08 on Nov 29, 2014

BrokenKnucklez
Apr 22, 2008

by zen death robot


OFFICER 13 INCH posted:

I'm dissapointed in the lack of information on the Chevy 305 in the OP

305s make good boat motors. Even better boat anchors.

Seizure Meat
Jul 23, 2008

by Smythe


OFFICER 13 INCH posted:

I'm dissapointed in the lack of information on the Chevy 305 in the OP

lol those are Mercury Marine 502's

meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

Kenshin posted:

Even if you just want your own boat it's probably a good idea to do classes. That said there is the (relatively) famous experience of the couple who circumnavigated on "Bumfuzzle", a ~40ft catamaran, back in the mid 2000s, who took the first day of their ASA 101 class, decided they didn't like taking classes, and then just went sailing. They made it, though as I read through their blog even near the end of their trip around the world 2-handing their boat they were still doing things that made me facepalm because I'd learned those things in my classes and they didn't do them while sailing around the world.

I have spent all afternoon reading Bumfuzzle - it starts here: http://www.bumfuzzle.com/blog/2003/...eroctober-2003/ - it's a good read; I might buy the book for a friend for Christmas. Yes, they make some slap-head mistakes (topfurler!) but fair play to them, they seemed better at learning on-the-job than most people.

Kenshin
Jan 10, 2007


meltie posted:

I have spent all afternoon reading Bumfuzzle - it starts here: http://www.bumfuzzle.com/blog/2003/...eroctober-2003/ - it's a good read; I might buy the book for a friend for Christmas. Yes, they make some slap-head mistakes (topfurler!) but fair play to them, they seemed better at learning on-the-job than most people.

Yeah I lost about a week of my free time to that blog (and hours of slow time at work)

Wistful of Dollars
Aug 25, 2009



I grew up sailing and racing 20 - 60 footers and I miss it. Sadly growing up and moving to landlocked places has stymied that love for a long time.

If I can ever find one, I'd love to get a Wylie 17 to take day sailing.

SuperDucky
May 13, 2007

by exmarx


El Scotch posted:

I grew up sailing and racing 20 - 60 footers and I miss it. Sadly growing up and moving to landlocked places has stymied that love for a long time.

If I can ever find one, I'd love to get a Wylie 17 to take day sailing.



Is that a sailboard rig attached to an open transom laser?

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meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

Kenshin posted:

Yeah I lost about a week of my free time to that blog (and hours of slow time at work)

I'm about half-way through I think. It's good, but I wish they'd actually SAIL somewhere instead of dieselling all over the place when there's wind! Is there something a bit special about a liveaboard cat where you have to use the motor if the wind is above 5kts?

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