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monsterzero
May 12, 2002
I HAVE POKED YOU IN THE EYE... WITH DEMOCRACY!

Lipstick Apathy

I'm putting my boat in a slip for the first time next week. Up until this point I've gotten by with carabiners on the cockpit locker and companionway hasps, but my marina is in the heart of California's meth-belt so I'm thinking locks might be a good idea.

Right now I'm leaning towards getting a handful of combo locks, maybe a size or two up from TSA luggage locks. I'm thinking those would a) keep the honest people honest, b) be small enough that it looks like I'm not trying to protect anything particularly valuable, and c) be easy enough for tweaker to cut/break without loving up the surrounding boat (lol, yeah right)

Any advice from experience?

Karma Comedian posted:

It's one of those 6 gallon portable tanks so there's just the one line but it seemed fine.

I had problems with leaky seals on the fuel connectors for my Johnson OB . If you don't have a visible seep you still might be drawing air. If it happens again, try pressing the line side against the tank firmly and see if it makes a difference.

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Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


monsterzero posted:

I'm putting my boat in a slip for the first time next week. Up until this point I've gotten by with carabiners on the cockpit locker and companionway hasps, but my marina is in the heart of California's meth-belt so I'm thinking locks might be a good idea.

Right now I'm leaning towards getting a handful of combo locks, maybe a size or two up from TSA luggage locks. I'm thinking those would a) keep the honest people honest, b) be small enough that it looks like I'm not trying to protect anything particularly valuable, and c) be easy enough for tweaker to cut/break without loving up the surrounding boat (lol, yeah right)

Any advice from experience?

It's a little expensive, but an Abus 180/50 brass combination padlock will keep honest people honest and not rust solid if you're near the sea.

gvibes
Jan 18, 2010

Leading us to the promised land (i.e., one tournament win in five years)

Kurten posted:

If I could offer one suggestion: put a dock in ASAP. If you've got to go up the road 10 minutes to launch your boat and wait in line, wait for idiots who don't know how to back up, people that load their boats on the ramp, etc etc...you will not use your boat nearly as much as you think you will when you buy the boat. You'll be sitting around many evenings going "Hey a sunset cruise sounds good..." pull out the binoculars, see the line over at the boatramp and think "eh gently caress that..." Put a dock in. Have EVERYTHING ready to go before you buy a boat. Then afterwards you're 100 feet or whatever from being in the boat and going when the urge hits you. I wish I had done that before I bought a boat.

I think the market is probably quiet right now because of the corona poo poo. I am in a tourist lake hell area and this has been the quietest memorial day weekend I've ever seen. Not seeing used boats on the side of the road like normal and the marinas are dead. Dunno about your area. Do you guys have a state/regional boat trader you can pick up?

Edit: another thing to consider is boat storage in the winter. If you have a place on property that's great because boat storage is expensive as poo poo usually, or is around here at least. You've also got to pull your docks if the lake freezes over like they do here. I assume Erie freezes over?
Speaking of, got my lift in and canopy on.

Still waiting on the dock delivery though.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe


Even as a non boat person, I'm pretty sure this isn't how boats work.


(Is a boat lift like that a common thing?)

gvibes
Jan 18, 2010

Leading us to the promised land (i.e., one tournament win in five years)

taqueso posted:

Even as a non boat person, I'm pretty sure this isn't how boats work.


(Is a boat lift like that a common thing?)
Where this is at (michigan), very much so. Just about every boat on my lake over ~1500 pounds or so is on a lift.

boxen
Feb 20, 2011


gvibes posted:

Where this is at (michigan), very much so. Just about every boat on my lake over ~1500 pounds or so is on a lift.

Minnesota, too. Usually there's a dock leading out to the lift, though...

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003



boxen posted:

Minnesota, too. Usually there's a dock leading out to the lift, though...

Lol ya there is something missing.

RE: ethanol, itís certainly worth the effort to find non-ethanol fuel if itís at all convenient. Otherwise you want to be diligent about keeping it dry and fresh. The ethanol loves to bond with water and phase out and ruin the fuel. Most boat fuel systems arenít sealed for evaporation/condensation like a carís is. Empty space in the tank and large temperature swings can cause a surprising amount of condensation to build up. You want to either keep tanks as full as possible to limit air space, or keep them empty and just bring the fuel you plan to use (easier for smaller boats with portable tanks).

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





taqueso posted:

Even as a non boat person, I'm pretty sure this isn't how boats work.


(Is a boat lift like that a common thing?)

Boat lifts are very common on inland areas, especially inland freshwater lakes.



This is a poo poo-garbage quality image but you can plainly see ten J/22 (22' keelboat sailboat) on boat lift/hydro hoists. In this case these are club-owned boats (at fwbc in texas) and they want to minimize total amount of maintenance required as that is a perpetual maintnenance cost.

The water there is bathwater warm, at least 85F for 6+ months out of the year, especially in the shallow areas like the marina. As a result alge forms quickly partly due to agricultural run-off. For a $50,000 boat (new) and $3000 hydro-hoist has a ~4-6 year payoff period due to less bottom paint maintenance. A new bottom job on a sailboat ranges from $1200-3500 typically

Hydro hoists are powered basically by the blower portion of a vacuum cleaner and then just float up and down so they don't have any moving parts, unless you run into it at high speed it ought to last 15-20 years with little to no maintenance. The privately owned J/24 I sailed on for 7+ years was always "dry sailed" from a hydro hoist. Boat lifts for bigger boats exist but they're rare once you get above ~26'. Most of the J/80s (26') at that club also had hydro hoists or some competing brand of boat lift.

edit: not the boat or hoist we used, but yeah if you google "j/80 hydrohoist" lots of results. Ours was a little lower so you still had to brush the bottom 8" of the rudder and keel at the dock, but not having to scrub the bottom every week before a race was ahhhmazzzhing


Hadlock fucked around with this message at 20:01 on May 26, 2020

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

That's really interesting. I'll have to pay more attention and see if I notice any boats on lifts next time I'm at the reservoir. The water is pretty cold here most of the year, so maybe it's not as much of a problem to keep your boat submerged. Also I would absolutely believe a majority of people around here are too cheap to spend money preventing expensive maintenance.

n0tqu1tesane
May 7, 2003

She was rubbing her ass all over my hands. They don't just do that for everyone.

Grimey Drawer

On the Gulf Coast cradle and sling lifts like these are common. If you leave a boat in the water around here it'll quickly start to grow barnacles and other unfriendly things.






I'm going to be installing a sling lift into our boat house for my Scout 172 once we get it repaired to the point of usability.

TheFluff
Dec 13, 2006

FRIENDS, LISTEN TO ME
I AM A SEAGULL
OF WEALTH AND TASTE


Slippery Tilde

We have lifts here in the Baltic sea as well. Fouling is a pretty minor problem here but a lot of people are trying to get away from using anti-fouling bottom paint entirely, and a lift is useful for that. Anti-fouling regulations are pretty strict and getting stricter, and it's not inconcievable that biocide paint may become illegal to use entirely in the Baltic the foreseeable future. Currently only copper oxide and copper thiocynate are legal to use on the Swedish east coast, and only in pretty low concentrations.

monsterzero
May 12, 2002
I HAVE POKED YOU IN THE EYE... WITH DEMOCRACY!

Lipstick Apathy

A boat lift would rule. Too bad I was born a generation too late to lease a spot on a lake, and a generation too soon for the Sacramento Valley to become an inland sea.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

TheFluff posted:

We have lifts here in the Baltic sea as well. Fouling is a pretty minor problem here but a lot of people are trying to get away from using anti-fouling bottom paint entirely, and a lift is useful for that. Anti-fouling regulations are pretty strict and getting stricter, and it's not inconcievable that biocide paint may become illegal to use entirely in the Baltic the foreseeable future. Currently only copper oxide and copper thiocynate are legal to use on the Swedish east coast, and only in pretty low concentrations.

A lot of people here are switching to non-copper paint, stuff with ECONEA instead of copper. Works pretty well, not like the old TBT, but nothing does.

Snowmankilla
Dec 6, 2000

True, true



So I think we are going with the Regal. I am super pumped and a bit nervous. Is there a good site to learn about boat ownership? I am taking a safety course, but itís all online, it feels more like getting your temps.

I am looking for 3 kind of things: general advice (donít forget to put the drain plug), what I should own (we have all the stuff to make it Coast Guard ready, but I am also buying a marine radio), tips and tricks (I was planning to take them through a local Power Squadron, but Covid).

Any advice or places to look? For reference I read tons on the Steven in sales site before getting our Sea Doo.

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003



CA is phasing in a boating license and Iíve been told that the online course is actually quite good and comprehensive.

Learn good radio etiquette and what channels are useful to monitor in your area. 16 is a given, but I also listen to 14 (vessel traffic) and 13 (bridge to bridge) because dodging the big ships is important in SF Bay.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





I will never get a boat license in protest, it's an abhorrence designed to keep tourists from killing themselves on houseboats, but are conveniently does not apply to them. Boating is/was one of the last major unregulated hobbies. Still is unregulated in most states, just not CA.

The fine for not having one is $100 and I'm happy to pay that in perpetuity. That's $0 in boat dollars

Yeah, though, knowing how to use your radio and to keep an eye out for shipping traffic is important on SF bay or any other major port. We learned very quickly to keep an eye out for commercial traffic our first time in the Houston Ship Channel.

monsterzero
May 12, 2002
I HAVE POKED YOU IN THE EYE... WITH DEMOCRACY!

Lipstick Apathy

I'm a whore for training/licensing/certifications so I don't care. Was just talking it with my wife on our way back from signing a lease on our slip, and thought it would be a good idea for us to do it together since we're both pretty green (though I've read the CA manual cover to cover already...)

ETA: the rental exception is pretty dumb, but I don't think houseboats have been a problem even lakes with lots of them. It's almost always a PWC or wakeboard loving up around here.

monsterzero fucked around with this message at 20:08 on May 28, 2020

monsterzero
May 12, 2002
I HAVE POKED YOU IN THE EYE... WITH DEMOCRACY!

Lipstick Apathy

Dupe- I'm as poo poo at posting as I am at sailing

wallaka
Jun 8, 2010

Least it wasn't a fucking red shell


Hadlock posted:

I will never get a boat license in protest, it's an abhorrence designed to keep tourists from killing themselves on houseboats, but are conveniently does not apply to them.



Lol ok. Licensing was put in place in my state because a bunch of idiots kept killing themselves and others because they knew fuckall about boating.

ili
Jul 26, 2003

MR. PRIME MINISTER by Roger Hargreaves

You don't need a boat licence as a sovereign citizen, just assert your right to travel across the seas in a conveyance.

skinner
Oct 22, 2003



Iíve captained 30-120ft boats in Maine and in Oregon. Oregon requires boaters to get licensed and they are 1000% worse than the unlicensed Maine boaters. I must have witnessed at least one collision a month in Oregon.

monsterzero
May 12, 2002
I HAVE POKED YOU IN THE EYE... WITH DEMOCRACY!

Lipstick Apathy

ili posted:

You don't need a boat licence as a sovereign citizen, just assert your right to travel across the seas in a conveyance.

What happens when a sovereign citizen ends up in an Admiralty court? "Aw gently caress, ya got me!"

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

skinner posted:

I’ve captained 30-120ft boats in Maine and in Oregon. Oregon requires boaters to get licensed and they are 1000% worse than the unlicensed Maine boaters. I must have witnessed at least one collision a month in Oregon.

Maine is unforgiving. And full of lobstermen who know how to run a boat. If you think Oregon is bad, go to any lake in the summer. Doesn't matter the location, it's something about being enclosed that makes people compete loving idiots. The Great Lakes get a pass in my limited experience.

Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




Our J24 sits on a hoist. It allows us to only have to maintain ablative paint on the bottom 5th or so of the keel and rudder. This is inshore in Georgia, though.

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003



There is a dude that dry sails a 1D48 in SF Bay. Keeping your boat out of the water as much as possible is great for it if you can manage. Gets harder when the boat gets bigger. Triply so if itís got a big keel and mast.

ili
Jul 26, 2003

MR. PRIME MINISTER by Roger Hargreaves

monsterzero posted:

What happens when a sovereign citizen ends up in an Admiralty court? "Aw gently caress, ya got me!"

Yeah but only if the court has gold fringes on their admiralty flag.

skinner
Oct 22, 2003



sharkytm posted:

Maine is unforgiving. And full of lobstermen who know how to run a boat. If you think Oregon is bad, go to any lake in the summer. Doesn't matter the location, it's something about being enclosed that makes people compete loving idiots. The Great Lakes get a pass in my limited experience.

Yeah I do think there is some ingrained seamanship in Maine, either that or you learn hard and fast. I do still see several boats up on the rocks every summer here in Casco Bay (sailboats and the fire departmentís marine rescue...).

In news: BRP has discontinued E-TECs. Good riddance, thereís a reason they came with ten year warranties. We have a few work boats using them and theyíre constantly broken and basically get repowered every five years.

TheFluff
Dec 13, 2006

FRIENDS, LISTEN TO ME
I AM A SEAGULL
OF WEALTH AND TASTE


Slippery Tilde

No licensing requirements for leisure craft here, unless they're longer than 12 meters over all and greater than 4 meter beam. There's a volountary leisure craft skipper's examination that you can take though that makes some insurance companies offer a small discount. I bought course material and self-studied it together with my co-owners and then we went and took the examination. Was not that hard. I think it was good to get a legitimate reason to really sit down and learn visual navigation with compass and paper chart properly, as well as really getting the basic COLREGs down for real (instead of just relying on what people have told me etc). Don't think it made any major differences wrt me being an idiot though.

The Stockholm archipelago is a pretty forgiving place though, at least the inner parts. Protected waters, no currents or tides, few large commercial ships, always close to land, houses and other boats, etc. And of course with the Swedish weather almost everyone is a fairweather sailor. Navigation used to be pretty dang challenging outside of the marked routes but these days GPS makes everything easy. The outer parts are a far more interesting place, but it's not that common to see people really get themselves in trouble even out there.

TheFluff fucked around with this message at 11:33 on May 29, 2020

n0tqu1tesane
May 7, 2003

She was rubbing her ass all over my hands. They don't just do that for everyone.

Grimey Drawer

Snowmankilla posted:

So I think we are going with the Regal. I am super pumped and a bit nervous. Is there a good site to learn about boat ownership? I am taking a safety course, but itís all online, it feels more like getting your temps.

I am looking for 3 kind of things: general advice (donít forget to put the drain plug), what I should own (we have all the stuff to make it Coast Guard ready, but I am also buying a marine radio), tips and tricks (I was planning to take them through a local Power Squadron, but Covid).

Any advice or places to look? For reference I read tons on the Steven in sales site before getting our Sea Doo.

BoatUS has a bunch of articles and training resources on stuff like that.

They have some training courses here:
http://www.boatus.org/

And their magazine has a ton of articles like this:
https://www.boatus.com/magazine/201...g-checklist.asp

https://www.boatus.com/magazine/tra...h-checklist.asp

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

skinner posted:

Yeah I do think there is some ingrained seamanship in Maine, either that or you learn hard and fast. I do still see several boats up on the rocks every summer here in Casco Bay (sailboats and the fire departmentís marine rescue...).

In news: BRP has discontinued E-TECs. Good riddance, thereís a reason they came with ten year warranties. We have a few work boats using them and theyíre constantly broken and basically get repowered every five years.

Agreed. The learners all come down here to the Cape and provide SeaTow/TowBoatUS with plenty of fodder.

And thank god about the ETecs. There's no place for a 2-stroke today. We called them E-tic-tic-tic-tics.
I'm a Suzuki guy on bigger outboards. Honda if you're made of money and don't mind the weight. Yamaha if you need the dealer support. Mercury... dunno why anyone buys Verados.
On smaller OBs, however, I've been impressed with the new Mercury (made by Tohatsu) EFI models. We've got a 20 on my wife's skiff, and it's a solid motor. Light enough to still R&R single handed, and the EFI does a nice job without the need for a battery.

Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




Big Taint posted:

There is a dude that dry sails a 1D48 in SF Bay. Keeping your boat out of the water as much as possible is great for it if you can manage. Gets harder when the boat gets bigger. Triply so if itís got a big keel and mast.

Snowmankilla
Dec 6, 2000

True, true



n0tqu1tesane posted:

BoatUS has a bunch of articles and training resources on stuff like that.

They have some training courses here:
http://www.boatus.org/

And their magazine has a ton of articles like this:
https://www.boatus.com/magazine/201...g-checklist.asp

https://www.boatus.com/magazine/tra...h-checklist.asp

Thatís where Iím taking my class through!

And here she is! We took possession yesterday at 8. Went out 4 time, and have docked 5! So far so good.

monsterzero
May 12, 2002
I HAVE POKED YOU IN THE EYE... WITH DEMOCRACY!

Lipstick Apathy

Congrats! I like the cantilevered arch, and am deeply jealous if the shade it grants.

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003




I know dude but itís true. Think about all the different poo poo boats have to prevent being in the water all the time from ruining them.

Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




I was intending to agree with you by default because of course keeping stuff out of the water is good for it.

monsterzero
May 12, 2002
I HAVE POKED YOU IN THE EYE... WITH DEMOCRACY!

Lipstick Apathy

Crunchy Black posted:

... of course keeping stuff out of the water is good for it.

uhh gently caress why didn't anyone tell me that

Big Taint
Oct 19, 2003



The caveat is itís easier said than done, especially if you want to use the boat regularly. Pulling onto a hydro hoist or float dock is easy, but you can only get a boat thatís so big on those. Small sailboats <25í can pretty easily be drysailed and craned in and out every time and live on a cradle or trailer at the yacht club or whatever but that ainít cheap. The guy with the 1D48 kept his boat in Alameda at a funky old boat yard so he probably had a relatively cheap arrangement, but they closed a few years ago and I donít know where the boat lives now.

Thatís one of the big downsides to I/O boats, they are often too big for hydrohoists or easy trailering, but the outdrives hate being in the water and are easily ruined by deferred maintenance.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Just shift all your tinned food and spanners to the front when you leave it parked and lift the back out that way.

Signed not a boat knower.

wallaka
Jun 8, 2010

Least it wasn't a fucking red shell


I installed a Pertronix Ignitor II electronic ignition with 45kV coil on my 3.0L MerCruiser 140. When I pulled the points base plate up, I discovered that both ignition advance springs were just rattling around in there. This might have been a cause of the stumble while applying throttle. I also replaced the plug wires and spark plugs. I checked the gap on the old plugs--anywhere from .037 to .050 on a points ignition. Friggin' PO's. The maximum should have been .035. I gapped the new plugs (NGK Iridium) conservatively at .035 but will probably change it to .045 with the new coil. This engine needs an Italian tune-up pretty badly; I had to sand quite a bit of rust from the distributor shaft, and the exhaust was burning carbon pretty well.

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originalnickname
Mar 9, 2005

tree


gvibes posted:

Speaking of, got my lift in and canopy on.

Still waiting on the dock delivery though.

That's a pretty boat! I've got a 2005 X7 currently and I really like (almost) everything about it. Except for how low in the water it sits, now that everyone on my lake's got 200,000+ dollar wakesurfing boats that throw some pretty huge rollers.

Do you pull skiers? If so, how do you find the wake with the motor farther back at ski speeds?

I still waterski because I'm old, but I kinda want to find a taller boat so it doesn't feel like a wakesurfer is going to swamp me when they drive by, and your boat looks like it probably wouldn't have this problem.

Obviously this would help with wakeboarding and wakesurfing, but I'd really like to hear how it is when you pull a skier if possible..

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