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Soul Reaver
Mar 8, 2009

in retrospect the old redtext was a little over the top, I think I was in a bad mood that day. it appears you've learned your lesson about slagging our gods and masters at beamdog but I'm still going to leave this av up because i think its funny

god bless


I want to edit together a bunch of audio into a video like a horrible frankenstein monster, but unfortunately I'm not quite sure how to even get started.

Here are my materials:

a) A video file in .mkv format
b) A video file in .avi format
c) An audio file in .mp3 format

What I'd like to do is modify the audio track of the mkv file so that it uses some audio taken from the .avi and .mp3 files. This may involve some minor video editing of the .mkv file too (pausing/duplicating some frames of the video to extend them) to fit the audio better.

I expect I'd need to:

1) Convert/extract the .mkv into an editable format
2) Extract the audio from the .avi file, and change it into the same type of audio as used by the .mkv
3) Edit the .mp3 to be the same type of audio as the .mkv
4) Edit the audio of the editable .mkv file (somehow), splicing in the audio I need
5) Edit the video of the editable .mkv file at some key points to make it fit the new audio track?

So I guess my questions are:
- Is there a good video editor that can be used to do the above without too much of learning curve? A sort of 'linear' editor would probably be easiest for me to get to grips with, but I really want my final file to retain the audio and video quality of the original mkv source as much as possible.
- Is there a recommended audio converter that I can use to change one sound format (likely stereo only) to match the .mkv audio (which likely will be a 5.1 audio file)?

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Geemer
Nov 4, 2010

What is it with Japan and ridiculous hair colors?


Buglord

I'd suggest you take a peek in the Let's Play Nofriendo Entertainment System subforum's Tech Support Fort. They've got links to some writeups that may help you. And you could always just ask in there.

Soul Reaver
Mar 8, 2009

in retrospect the old redtext was a little over the top, I think I was in a bad mood that day. it appears you've learned your lesson about slagging our gods and masters at beamdog but I'm still going to leave this av up because i think its funny

god bless


Geemer posted:

I'd suggest you take a peek in the Let's Play Nofriendo Entertainment System subforum's Tech Support Fort. They've got links to some writeups that may help you. And you could always just ask in there.

Yeah, these are pretty useful. I'll see what I can do with MeGUI and AviSynth. Got a feeling it'll be a bit of a learning curve but there are a lot of guides linked there. Thanks a lot!

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Editing video can be pretty weird stuff. I found it handy to keep in mind that each video file you have is two parts under the hood - compressed video stream and a compressed audio stream. There are loads of different formats for the two different streams which can be a big pain in the rear end.

If you're using a video editing program like Adobe Premiere, you're going to have a timeline down below and then a video preview window up top. You put your video clips down below in whatever order you want and then you start puttting down the audio tracks.

If you know exactly what you want to do with your audio, then edit it into the final form in an audio editor like Audacity. Now that you have your finished audio you drop that onto the timeline and can do the fiddly work of getting the video frames to match up.

The guides in Nofriendo should be handy but knowing that you can edit audio and video independently may be useful.

Soul Reaver
Mar 8, 2009

in retrospect the old redtext was a little over the top, I think I was in a bad mood that day. it appears you've learned your lesson about slagging our gods and masters at beamdog but I'm still going to leave this av up because i think its funny

god bless


CuddleChunks posted:

Editing video can be pretty weird stuff. I found it handy to keep in mind that each video file you have is two parts under the hood - compressed video stream and a compressed audio stream. There are loads of different formats for the two different streams which can be a big pain in the rear end.

If you're using a video editing program like Adobe Premiere, you're going to have a timeline down below and then a video preview window up top. You put your video clips down below in whatever order you want and then you start puttting down the audio tracks.

If you know exactly what you want to do with your audio, then edit it into the final form in an audio editor like Audacity. Now that you have your finished audio you drop that onto the timeline and can do the fiddly work of getting the video frames to match up.

The guides in Nofriendo should be handy but knowing that you can edit audio and video independently may be useful.

I might well end up editing the audio separately, yes. Will be a bit of a struggle 'matching up' all the formats though.

I don't have adobe premiere unfortunately so I'll have to make do with other options.

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


You might be interested in two pieces of free software (for personal use, at least): Lightworks and Blackmagic Fusion 7. Lightworks is a nonlinear editing suite for video (like Premiere), and Fusion is a compositing package like After Effects.

Soul Reaver
Mar 8, 2009

in retrospect the old redtext was a little over the top, I think I was in a bad mood that day. it appears you've learned your lesson about slagging our gods and masters at beamdog but I'm still going to leave this av up because i think its funny

god bless


Factory Factory posted:

You might be interested in two pieces of free software (for personal use, at least): Lightworks and Blackmagic Fusion 7. Lightworks is a nonlinear editing suite for video (like Premiere), and Fusion is a compositing package like After Effects.

Thanks for these. I think they might be almost a bit too powerful for what I'm planning on doing (I've found nonlinear editors really hard to wrap my head around) but if I get nowhere with AVISynth I'll look into these.

I feel like I'm making some progress in understanding some of the basics now at least and feel I should have my various materials prepared soon.

Is there anything in particular I need to look out for to prevent quality loss? I'd like my final file to look and sound as much as the current unedited 720p mkv file without ballooning the size.

Soul Reaver fucked around with this message at Dec 10, 2014 around 00:57

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

Oh dear, oh my,
that shouldn't be said.


Work in as high resolution as possible for as long as possible. Pros will use lossless codecs the whole way through. If you can't do lossless, at least don't recompress over and over - always work from the original when possible. If you're editing audio, it's helpful to record in 24-bit/96 KHz, not because the quality is better in the finished product but because it's easier to edit and mess with volume and playback speed without sacrificing quality.

Soul Reaver
Mar 8, 2009

in retrospect the old redtext was a little over the top, I think I was in a bad mood that day. it appears you've learned your lesson about slagging our gods and masters at beamdog but I'm still going to leave this av up because i think its funny

god bless


Factory Factory posted:

Work in as high resolution as possible for as long as possible. Pros will use lossless codecs the whole way through. If you can't do lossless, at least don't recompress over and over - always work from the original when possible. If you're editing audio, it's helpful to record in 24-bit/96 KHz, not because the quality is better in the finished product but because it's easier to edit and mess with volume and playback speed without sacrificing quality.

Unfortunately the source files already have some compression, but I'll avoid re-saving anything but the final product in any compressed method.

Geemer
Nov 4, 2010

What is it with Japan and ridiculous hair colors?


Buglord

If you're using AviSynth or basically any other NLE, you're only saving a list of edits until you do the final rendering. There will be no loss of quality.

If you want to render intermediate files, there's lossless codecs available (don't render uncompressed, it's just a waste of space). Lagarith is one such lossless codec. HD material will still be huge, but at least manageable. Not something you'd want to upload to Youtube, though. You can render to Lagarith from AviSynth by using VirtualDub.

As for the audio side of things, just keep things raw WAV until the final render, the audio size will generally be dwarfed by the video size anyway.

Soul Reaver
Mar 8, 2009

in retrospect the old redtext was a little over the top, I think I was in a bad mood that day. it appears you've learned your lesson about slagging our gods and masters at beamdog but I'm still going to leave this av up because i think its funny

god bless


Geemer posted:

If you're using AviSynth or basically any other NLE, you're only saving a list of edits until you do the final rendering. There will be no loss of quality.

If you want to render intermediate files, there's lossless codecs available (don't render uncompressed, it's just a waste of space). Lagarith is one such lossless codec. HD material will still be huge, but at least manageable. Not something you'd want to upload to Youtube, though. You can render to Lagarith from AviSynth by using VirtualDub.

As for the audio side of things, just keep things raw WAV until the final render, the audio size will generally be dwarfed by the video size anyway.

Just to update people: I ended up using AviDemux to extract the audio files from the video. The 6 channel audio was an ac3 format, the stereo (unfortunately) mp3. The audio is in FLAC.

I'm using Audacity with the VI plugins now to 'upmix' the mp3 to match the ac3 in terms of the channels, dB levels etc. I'm saving these as Audacity Project files only and the only audio export I'll do is the final ac3 with all the bits spliced in, so there should hopefully be minimal loss in that respect.

I'm not at the AVISynth stage yet, but all that I'll really need to do when I get to it is to remove the old ac3, add the new ac3, and then add a couple of frames to make the video synch with the audio.

One thing I'm not sure I get yet: if I create an AVISynth script, can I run that script together with the video file to view a 'preview' of the final product without having to render it first? Or will every edit attempt require me to render the video to see the outcome if I use AviSynth?

Flagrama
Jun 19, 2010



Lipstick Apathy

Soul Reaver posted:

One thing I'm not sure I get yet: if I create an AVISynth script, can I run that script together with the video file to view a 'preview' of the final product without having to render it first? Or will every edit attempt require me to render the video to see the outcome if I use AviSynth?

Theoretically you can play a .avs in VLC/MPC-HC (don't know about WMP) but in practice it usually plays like crap. You can try it but if you want to just check your edits and your audio timing I'd just render a super low quality (because it is fast) video file and play it/skip through it normally.

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Geemer
Nov 4, 2010

What is it with Japan and ridiculous hair colors?


Buglord

Playing an AviSynth script to check for audio sync is a recipe for disaster. Though if all you're doing is adding some frames, it might work.
You can get VirtualDub to show you the audio track of an AVS, so if you're just checking for peaks matching certain frames, do that.

Otherwise, just render a very low quality video.

Audacity project files are a great way to avoid quality degradation, so no worries there.

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