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Bob Saget IRL
Oct 24, 2014



Nice. Added to the OP.

Bob Saget IRL fucked around with this message at Jan 22, 2015 around 01:14

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Tendales
Mar 9, 2012


Same Great Paste posted:

For burgers, I like to follow the advice from http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives...ng-burgers.html

Basically get the pan screaming hot, then press the burger hard BEFORE any of the fat has a chance to turn to liquid. You get an insanely good crust without sacrificing any patty juiciness.

It's even better with a shitton of onions. http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives...on-burgers.html

shankerz
Dec 7, 2014

Must Go Faster!


Ok so the wife went out today and bought two 12 inch cast iron pans. One has the raised up grill bars on the pan and the other is flat. Anyone have advice for how I should break these brand new pans in with a seasoning?

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

shankerz posted:

Ok so the wife went out today and bought two 12 inch cast iron pans. One has the raised up grill bars on the pan and the other is flat. Anyone have advice for how I should break these brand new pans in with a seasoning?

The grill bars one you can throw away.

I kid, I kid, of course, but I've never really cared for the superficial grill marks. Clean up isn't that different, though, but I prefer my food to get completely in contact with the pan's surface for cooking.

As for seasoning, it depends if you want to cook food right away, or are willing to spend a few hours laying down a proper season. Either way is fine, one will give you a better season, though.

For a proper season first, pick an oil (no extra-virgin anything), I'd recommend one with a higher smokepoint, like safflower - an article recommends flaxseed because of science-y reasons but that gets the house super smokey (but gently caress it, everything will get smokey no matter what). Heat your oven to 4350 350F or so and then rub a small amount of oil into your cooled pan, coating it completely, but not leaving any excess oil in there when you're done. Put it in the oven for an hour. Repeat the process three or four (or five) times. Et voila.

For a cooking season, just put oil in the pan and cook poo poo. Over and over.

edit: Proper care required for both.

Drifter fucked around with this message at Jan 23, 2015 around 02:45

shankerz
Dec 7, 2014

Must Go Faster!


Drifter posted:

Heat your oven to 4350 F or so and then rub a small amount of oil into your cooled pan, coating it completely, but not leaving any excess oil in there when you're done.

Going to do everything you listed except my oven won't go to 4350 F

Going to need a lava pit or something to get that kind of heat.

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

Ahaha, my bad Nice catch. 350 to 400F. You can go to 500 or so if you like, but I think that just speeds up the process of polymerization, it doesn't make it 'stronger' (feel free to tell me otherwise).

THe biggest thing it to wipe the coated oil as dry as you can each time in the pan or else it will just make for a tacky surface.

edit: depending on the pans, you may need to strip the factory season off. Factory seasoning can be stripped with warm soapy water and a bristle brush, otherwise you need to bust out steel wool or sandpaper or electrolysis.

Drifter fucked around with this message at Jan 23, 2015 around 02:48

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



You can also just cook on a factory seasoned pan. A couple months of regular use and your pan will be shiny and very nonstick.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Drifter posted:

edit: depending on the pans, you may need to strip the factory season off. Factory seasoning can be stripped with warm soapy water and a bristle brush, otherwise you need to bust out steel wool or sandpaper or electrolysis.
Factory seasons are done with a soybean oil, which is good for, I believe, the same reason flaxseed oil (drying oil). I don't think there's a reason to remove it. If you do go with flax, or really any oil, make sure it's edible.

ugly
Jul 22, 2003
No clue

Pillbug

One more vote for just cooking with the thing.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Just cook with the drat thing, it's already seasoned. If you really want to make them non-stick, the best thing is cooking lots of times with oil.

phthalocyanine
May 19, 2013



net work error posted:

Preheating cast iron in the over rather than a burner, yes or no?

Cast iron is actually terrible at evenly conducting heat. If you've got a range with burners that can get the entire surface, preheating in the oven might not be necessary, but if you've got a piddly gas burner like me, and you need that sucker to be hot all across the surface, preheating it in the oven is the way to go unless you want (or don't care if) the center of whatever you're searing to be much more seared than the edges.

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

phthalocyanine posted:

Cast iron is actually terrible at evenly conducting heat. If you've got a range with burners that can get the entire surface, preheating in the oven might not be necessary, but if you've got a piddly gas burner like me, and you need that sucker to be hot all across the surface, preheating it in the oven is the way to go unless you want (or don't care if) the center of whatever you're searing to be much more seared than the edges.
Like all things, there are times to use a cast iron pan, and times where another pan with different thermal properties will be better suited.

When you're doing 'delicate' work with cast iron, pretend it's a flat wok - different areas will have different temperatures. A way to avoid that (to a degree [ho ho ho]) is to either move the pan around the heat source or change the flame ring, on a gas burner, from a larger radius to a smaller one. I can make beautiful eggs, scrambled or omelets or other, on a large cast iron pan, but it's certainly easier to do in a copper or stainless steel one.

Liquid, or moving the food, also helps to stabilize the heat of the food when cooking.

I think for a lot of cooking it's a waste of time to 'preheat' and try to perfectly stabilize a cast iron pan in an oven when you're doing stovetop cooking.

Drifter fucked around with this message at Jan 24, 2015 around 17:23

phthalocyanine
May 19, 2013



It doesn't really take very long to throw the pan in the oven if it's not already there, turn it on and do something else for 20 minutes. The heat retention of cast iron makes it a great pan to use for a lot of searing applications, which isn't necessarily delicate work - but it's nice to have the heat even on it.

Baron Fuzzlewhack
Sep 22, 2010

ALIVE ENOUGH TO DIE


The only time I bother to pre-heat my cast iron in the oven is when I plan on using the oven anyway, e.g. sear meat on the stovetop then finish it in the oven. Otherwise it feels like a giant waste of power to heat an entire oven just for a stovetop dish.

CannonFodder
Jan 26, 2001



Outrageous Lumpwad

I got a 12 inch pan for Christmas to go with my 7 inch pan, and when using a coil burner that is about 9 inches wide I just give it a longer time to heat up and move it around occasionally. If the tops of the sides are hot, then the cooking surface is plenty hot. The maiden voyage was searing a beef brisket for Hannukah (brother in law is Jewish) and it did just fine. Now it lives in the oven because it's loving enormous.

I can't wait to spatchcock a chicken and roast it over some root veggies. I asked for the 12 inch because I tried and love the Alton Brown green bean casserole but the 7 inch just wasn't cutting it and I had to split the recipe between the pan and a corning wear dish. Now it's just one big pan going from stove to oven.

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


phthalocyanine posted:

Cast iron is actually terrible at evenly conducting heat. If you've got a range with burners that can get the entire surface, preheating in the oven might not be necessary, but if you've got a piddly gas burner like me, and you need that sucker to be hot all across the surface, preheating it in the oven is the way to go unless you want (or don't care if) the center of whatever you're searing to be much more seared than the edges.
Seriously, when people are ready to accept that cast iron sucks for a lot of things, aluminum will be there waiting for them.

I just picked this up today for thirty bucks. Aluminum is superior for cooking with in almost every way. Heat distribution, cost, preheat time, no having to season, not being a huge pan sperg, weight, you name it.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


feelz good man posted:

I just picked this up today for thirty bucks. Aluminum is superior for cooking with in almost every way. Heat distribution, cost, preheat time, no having to season, not being a huge pan sperg, weight, you name it.



Ha, you cant fool us with your teeny tabasco. You purchased a perfectly ordinary sized pan for ordinary pan money. I am not jelly at all.

AT ALL.

Suspect Bucket fucked around with this message at Jan 27, 2015 around 16:53

MrYenko
Jun 17, 2012

#2 isn't ALWAYS bad...


feelz good man posted:

Seriously, when people are ready to accept that cast iron sucks for a lot of things, aluminum will be there waiting for them.

I just picked this up today for thirty bucks. Aluminum is superior for cooking with in almost every way. Heat distribution, cost, preheat time, no having to season, not being a huge pan sperg, weight, you name it.



In three hundred years, when I am long dead, and the oceans have risen and fallen again, and the plumes of radioactive ash have finally settled over our world, your aluminum will be nothing but junk, delaminating from extreme intragranular corrosion, if it hasn't already been melted down to build more nuclear bombers.

My cast iron, however, will be resting in a drawer inside one of the countless ruined homes, somewhere in the ravaged no-mans land that was once a metropolitan US city, quietly laughing to itself.

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008






Slippery Tilde

I've played seven days to die, I can attest to that. All the pots you find in the postapocalyptic world are cast iron.

XyloJW
Jul 23, 2007


feelz good man posted:

Seriously, when people are ready to accept that cast iron sucks for a lot of things, aluminum will be there waiting for them.

I just picked this up today for thirty bucks. Aluminum is superior for cooking with in almost every way. Heat distribution, cost, preheat time, no having to season, not being a huge pan sperg, weight, you name it.



Cast iron is hipster cookware. It's old fashioned and really inconvenient and kind of dirty , but everyone says it's a million times better.

Indolent Bastard
Oct 26, 2007

I WON THIS AMAZING AVATAR! I'M A WINNER! WOOOOO!


feelz good man posted:

Seriously, when people are ready to accept that cast iron sucks for a lot of things, aluminum will be there waiting for them.

I just picked this up today for thirty bucks. Aluminum is superior for cooking with in almost every way. Heat distribution, cost, preheat time, no having to season, not being a huge pan sperg, weight, you name it.



Eh, no thanks. New evidence for an active role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease.

KaiserSchnitzel
Feb 23, 2003

Hey baby I think we Havel lot in common

My friend is the kind of person that keeps everything in her car, forever. It's kind of embarrassing, really. Recently she found a 6" Lodge skillet in her trunk - she had no idea when it got there or even why she had it to begin with. The whole thing was covered in rust. She asked me if there was anything I could do with it. . . heh. It's beautiful now.

Does anyone have any experience with enameled cast iron? I have a Copco 109E that has some burnt oil on the outside. I know it doesn't harm the pan at all, but there's just no reason to not keep that thing shiny and bright yellow. I've read some tips about bleach and overnight soaking, but that doesn't sound too wholesome to me. Does anyone have any ideas on how to clean that up?

Vinegar and baking soda?

Phanatic
Mar 13, 2007
Please don't forget that I am an extremely racist idiot who also has terrible opinions about the Culture series.



Aluminum most likely has nothing to do with Alzheimer's disease. Or if it does have something to do with it, it's an effect that's so small as to be dwarfed by statistical noise. A well-set-up study has about a 50:50 chance of finding any link, which is good evidence there actually isn't one.

http://www.alzheimer.ca/en/Research...search/Aluminum
http://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...cc27_story.html

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

I have a Wearever aluminum skillet. What I like most is it's easy to clean. Stupidly the handle is steel and heavier than the skillet pan so it wants to lean back. Pretty good skillet otherwise.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



My mother has a cast aluminum dutch oven that I keep trying to steal but is the one pan she always wants back.

Back to ironchat, I should clean up the rusty old basement special Lodge combo cooker sitting on my project shelf. I have a problem with the things and keep picking them up and giving them away. I like them a bunch but already have a stack of skillets and a few proper Dutch ovens so they end up going to people stocking new kitchens before I get the itch again.

Paper With Lines
Aug 21, 2013

The snozzberries taste like snozzberries!


Aren't there a bunch of issues with aluminium being porous and soap possibly not getting cleaned off all the way? One year in the boy scouts, one of the kids in my troop got pretty bad diarrhea and the adults thought it was because he didn't rinse off his aluminium mess set well enough.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!

Paper With Lines posted:

Aren't there a bunch of issues with aluminium being porous and soap possibly not getting cleaned off all the way? One year in the boy scouts, one of the kids in my troop got pretty bad diarrhea and the adults thought it was because he didn't rinse off his aluminium mess set well enough.

That strikes me as bullshit. Aluminum isn't porous in a way that would be at all relevant in that situation. Even if it was, the amount of soap you'd ingest would be negligible.

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.

I've heard that before in remote camps - cook didn't rinse the dishes properly so the crew got the runs from the dish soap. More likely it was giardia or some low grade food poisoning bug.

Indolent Bastard
Oct 26, 2007

I WON THIS AMAZING AVATAR! I'M A WINNER! WOOOOO!


Hexigrammus posted:

I've heard that before in remote camps - cook didn't rinse the dishes properly so the crew got the runs from the dish soap. More likely it was giardia or some low grade food poisoning bug.

The best story I've heard about remote camps (logging) was that the cook didn't rinse the dishes soon enough after dinner and the whole camp got bears.

niss
Jul 9, 2008

the amazing gnome

Indolent Bastard posted:

The best story I've heard about remote camps (logging) was that the cook didn't rinse the dishes soon enough after dinner and the whole camp got bears.

Sounds like one bad day, hungry bears and diarrhea

shankerz
Dec 7, 2014

Must Go Faster!


Alright guys asking for help again. I made lobster and steak a few nights ago in my two cast iron pans and my wife put them in the dishwasher and 2 days later I discovered them. One has started to rust. Can I just WD-40 both pans and then cook Them and re-season them?

Baron Fuzzlewhack
Sep 22, 2010

ALIVE ENOUGH TO DIE


Rule of thumb: if you wouldn't put it in your food, don't put it on your pan.

Try taking steel wool or sandpaper to it and see if you can take off the rust. After that, just oil down the parts that were rusty (and are now rust-free) and pop it in the oven to re-season it, or just cook something in oil with it. Honestly, though, if the rust isn't that bad (i.e. surface-level, just a tinge of rusty red) just cook with it a few times and it'll fix itself.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Wd40 kinda scares me, I'd just scrub with steel wool, reseason and cook with it again

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008






Slippery Tilde

Yeah not sure why you'd want to use wd-40

Just a quick wipe with any neutral cooking oil or crisco or whatever will do.

shankerz
Dec 7, 2014

Must Go Faster!


Thanks guys. I wasn't thinking when I said wd40.. lol good advice as always

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


You know if you eat out at any restaurant there is almost a 100% chance you ate something cooked in an alumimum skillet or pot, right?

Baron Fuzzlewhack
Sep 22, 2010

ALIVE ENOUGH TO DIE


feelz good man posted:

You know if you eat out at any restaurant there is almost a 100% chance you ate something cooked in an alumimum skillet or pot, right?

He doesn't remember even eating out at the restaurant.

wheez the roux
Aug 2, 2004
THEY SHOULD'VE GIVEN IT TO LYNCH

Death to the Seahawks. Death to Seahawks posters.

he also doesn't remember ever using antiperspirant

Indolent Bastard
Oct 26, 2007

I WON THIS AMAZING AVATAR! I'M A WINNER! WOOOOO!


wheez the roux posted:

he also doesn't remember ever using antiperspirant

Jokes on you I have an allergic reaction to antiperspirant, I can only use deodorant.

As for eating out, I do so about twice a month, so fairly low risk. I like making my own food.

Truth be told I'm not worried about aluminum pots, I was just half heartedly bashing it because this is the cast iron thread.

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Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Will I be able to get an amazing sear and crust on my steak in an aluminium pan?

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