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The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



TheKingslayer posted:

What's the best way to take rust off cast iron? I got two small lodge pans for a pittance at the thrift store and they need a little love.

Steel wool, or a wire wheel on a rotary tool if it's really bad.

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MrYenko
Jun 17, 2012

#2 isn't ALWAYS bad...


TheKingslayer posted:

What's the best way to take rust off cast iron? I got two small lodge pans for a pittance at the thrift store and they need a little love.

In descending order of effectiveness:

Media blasting
Wire wheel
Wire brush
Brillo pad

If the corrosion isnt too bad, even a regular scouring pad can work, and it generally wont touch the seasoning unless you really get nuts with it.

Im a big fan of media blasting, since you can get all of the old seasoning off and start from totally bare iron.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

electrolysis works too, its the least labor intensive way, especially if it's anything that isnt easy to access with a wire wheel or steel wool

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


TheKingslayer posted:

What's the best way to take rust off cast iron? I got two small lodge pans for a pittance at the thrift store and they need a little love.

How much rust? Dremel with a sanding pad, sanding pad, and a dust mask is all I used.

Nettle Soup
Jan 30, 2010

Oh, and Jones was there too.


Brillo pads or steel wool and elbow grease work fine too, if you just wanna be cheap and it's not too bad.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003
Probation
Can't post for 4 days!


yeah it depends entirely on how bad the rust is. is it just, like, powder/discoloration with no pitting?

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Nm

wormil fucked around with this message at Jan 8, 2018 around 02:25

Hasselblad
Dec 13, 2017


BraveUlysses posted:

electrolysis works too, its the least labor intensive way, especially if it's anything that isnt easy to access with a wire wheel or steel wool

There is the option of tossing it in the oven and running a clean cycle.

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

JakeP Heroes of the Storm Fan Club President
"When I grow up, I want to be just like JakeP from the Something Awful Heroes of the Storm Thread!"
-BrianBoitano

"Easy Off" oven cleaner spray. Spray all over (outside), put in a trash bag and wait a day. Rust and prior seasoning comes right off. Probably other sprays too.

Before:


After:

A little elbow grease took care of those remaining specs.

After 3 rounds of seasoning:


Same pan, 1 year later:

McSpankWich
Aug 31, 2005

Plum Island Animal Disease Research Center. Sounds charming.

But the one in the first picture looks wonderful :/

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



McSpankWich posted:

But the one in the first picture looks wonderful :/

It's definitely fine to cook with, but look at the uneven finish, how there are bright spots. Those spots are unpolymerized oil, and that's what you're trying to avoid when seasoning.

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

JakeP Heroes of the Storm Fan Club President
"When I grow up, I want to be just like JakeP from the Something Awful Heroes of the Storm Thread!"
-BrianBoitano

Yeah, harsh close-up spoilered.



moller
Jan 10, 2007

Swan stole my music and framed me!


My ten inch Lodge looks roughly 50x more uneven than that. Uh-oh.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003
Probation
Can't post for 4 days!


SymmetryrtemmyS posted:

It's definitely fine to cook with

you could have stopped there

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



Sorry if I offended you BrianBoitano, I was just trying to explain why it wasn't perfect to begin with.

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

JakeP Heroes of the Storm Fan Club President
"When I grow up, I want to be just like JakeP from the Something Awful Heroes of the Storm Thread!"
-BrianBoitano

No offense taken. I thought it was decent until we moved and started storing something else nested with it. The grease that came off it was the last straw, and that's when I read about the "right" kinds of oil.

Did $20 organic flax initial seasoning, sunflower oil to cook & maintain. Much better than canola + not wiping dry.

E: Do grills get too hot to keep a cast iron style seasoning? I went ahead with coat 1 since I had the flax out for my grill pan.

BrianBoitano fucked around with this message at Jan 13, 2018 around 23:19

red19fire
May 26, 2010


This is probably a dumb question but are enameled cast iron pans better or worse than regular cast iron? It says the cooking surface is 'black matte enamel', is that like a nonstick coating? or more similar to raw cast iron?

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



red19fire posted:

This is probably a dumb question but are enameled cast iron pans better or worse than regular cast iron? It says the cooking surface is 'black matte enamel', is that like a nonstick coating? or more similar to raw cast iron?

Not a dumb question; they're neither better nor worse, just different. An enameled coating means they're easier to clean, but it won't develop a seasoning like raw cast iron. They will both heat up pretty much the same since they're both cast iron. I have a regular cast iron pan, but my cast iron dutch oven is enameled. The enamel will also allow you to use whatever acidic ingredients you'd like without the fear of stripping away carefully-built seasoning, since none will develop on it.

I'm probably biased, but I think enamel makes more sense for a cooking vessel like a dutch oven, while raw cast iron is better for a stovetop piece like a pan or skillet where you will probably be in there with a spatula/tongs/etc constantly agitating the food. Enamel can chip if you're not too careful with it. It's not likely, but it can happen depending on the quality of the coating on the piece.

If you're just starting out with cast iron, I'd recommend going with a raw piece first, regardless of what type you get. It'll help familiarize yourself with its heating tendencies, it'll let you learn how to season a piece (protip: just cook with it), and raw cast iron is less expensive, as well.

atothesquiz
Aug 31, 2004


red19fire posted:

This is probably a dumb question but are enameled cast iron pans better or worse than regular cast iron? It says the cooking surface is 'black matte enamel', is that like a nonstick coating? or more similar to raw cast iron?

There isn't much difference between a normal cast iron pan and the "enameled" one you linked above. The cooking surface is the same but the exterior is prettier.

When most people say "enameled" cast iron, they're typically referring to a pan/dutch oven that is completely coated in enamel. See most every Le Creuset piece of cast iron. As others have said, they're very nice because you can cook anything in them without worrying about your precious seasoning. They do have limitations; I typically don't use them for high heat (450F+) searing like a steak, for example. However, they still work great at searing chicken skin, pot roasts, etc.

I personally have two regular cast iron pans (8" and 12" flat bottomed, dont bother with the "grill" style) and a lot of different Le Creuset pieces (I'm a brand whore).

I'd recommend the two size pans I have above, if you're only getting one, go bigger first. Second, I'd recommend a 5.5qt+ round enameled dutch oven with a lid. These are the two pieces in my house that get by far the most use. I have larger and I have smaller dutch ovens but for cooking for 2 with left overs in mind, the 5.5qt is great.

After that, I love my braisers, which substitute as great cast iron pans (without a handle).

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OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003
Probation
Can't post for 4 days!


man, i tried to boil pasta in my dutch oven because I figured hey, its a pot, right?

holy poo poo that took for loving ever to come to a boil. not doing that again

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