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Ra-amun
Feb 25, 2011


So is good seasoning important for cooking shakshuka in cast iron? Every cookbook and image online usually showcases it cooked in cast iron pans. I, on the other hand, can't simmer anything for too long in my pan without it ending up tasting metallic and ruining the dish. I can fry potatoes and scramble eggs just fine, its just anything involving decent amounts of liquids tastes like an iron supplement before its even done cooking.

Honestly I don't take great care of my pan, just a water wash or with a small bit of a soap, drying on the stove with a bit of an oil wipe down but I sometimes leave it to sit sometimes. Now that I think about it though, I don't think it really has any seasoning on the cooking surface since it dries off whitish grey instead of shiny black.

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Nettle Soup
Jan 30, 2010

Oh, and Jones was there too.


College Slice

Never had a problem with my little frying pan and I've done all sorts in it, nobody has ever commented either.

It might be worth seasoning it properly and not washing it with soap for at least a couple of meals? Sounds like the flavour of rust, when really the food shouldn't be touching the "iron" at all.

Also that looks delicious and I'm totally gonna go cook that now, thanks!

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Ra-amun posted:

So is good seasoning important for cooking shakshuka in cast iron? Every cookbook and image online usually showcases it cooked in cast iron pans. I, on the other hand, can't simmer anything for too long in my pan without it ending up tasting metallic and ruining the dish. I can fry potatoes and scramble eggs just fine, its just anything involving decent amounts of liquids tastes like an iron supplement before its even done cooking.

Honestly I don't take great care of my pan, just a water wash or with a small bit of a soap, drying on the stove with a bit of an oil wipe down but I sometimes leave it to sit sometimes. Now that I think about it though, I don't think it really has any seasoning on the cooking surface since it dries off whitish grey instead of shiny black.
It is more than other items, tomatoes are acidic enough that you don't want to be cooking with them a ton with a fresh/poor seasoning.

I also don't really take care of my pans as well, I'll just use paper towel and some water to wipe things out. A bit of salt if that fails, then a thin layer of oil brought up to smoking on occasion. Mine only goes white/grayish if I have the burner on high and have preheated my pan for steaks in the oven, going gray from just drying off is probably not good.

feverish and oversexed
Mar 9, 2007

I LOVE the galley!


I bought a set of cast irons (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1) and they are coming today! They are pre-seasoned, but after reading around a bit I see it's recommended to season them anyways before use.

I've never owned cast irons, and the places I've looked online recommend scouring them with soap and water, this being the first and last time you should do so with the pans... but I'm wondering since they are preseasoned if I should do that?

I'll be breaking in the big one tomorrow with bacon, yesssss.

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

Obese Janissary posted:

I bought a set of cast irons (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1) and they are coming today! They are pre-seasoned, but after reading around a bit I see it's recommended to season them anyways before use.

I've never owned cast irons, and the places I've looked online recommend scouring them with soap and water, this being the first and last time you should do so with the pans... but I'm wondering since they are preseasoned if I should do that?

I'll be breaking in the big one tomorrow with bacon, yesssss.

A lot of (some?) people prefer to scrub off the factory season and build their own; it's not something you should feel a need to do. It'll wear and repair over time with regular use anyway.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


You dont have to give them a scrub other then to maybe get whatever factory dust or contaminants might be on them. Maybe give them a quick rinse, then heat dry. Then cook bacon! Factory seasoning aint devil or nuthin.

feverish and oversexed
Mar 9, 2007

I LOVE the galley!


OK good to know, I'll leave the factory season on, I honestly didn't want to mess with them too much. Thanks!

funkatron3000
Jun 17, 2005

Better Living Through Chemistry

It feels odd posting woodworking stuff in a cast iron cooking thread, but I hope y'all will forgive me. I finished up the paddle that I'm going to use for that big 30 gallon cast iron cauldron I posted a couple pages back. It didn't take much more work than just cutting out a rough paddle shape from a board, but I think the extra effort looks pretty great.

This is the glued up rough form from maple and walnut. The maple looked like it would have some nice figure to it. The growth rings are all oriented parallel to the stirring direction for maximum strength.




Post rough shaping on the band saw.




Then a whole lot of sanding and a food safe beeswax and mineral oil finish that I make to use on cutting boards.




The fabricated stand for the cauldron is still a work in progress.

funkatron3000 fucked around with this message at Mar 30, 2015 around 00:33

Nettle Soup
Jan 30, 2010

Oh, and Jones was there too.


College Slice

Looking good! Wouldn't the glue/wood have issues spending a lot of time submerged in hot liquid?

*knows nothing about wood or glue*

funkatron3000
Jun 17, 2005

Better Living Through Chemistry

Nah, should be fine, at least I hope so. I used titebond 2, which is the food safe one that you use for cutting boards. If anyone knows for sure that it's a terrible idea, let me know heh.

The wax finish will also melt a bit in hot liquid, so I only used enough to soak into the wood. There's basically none on the surface.

Bob Saget IRL
Oct 24, 2014



All I know is that looks awesome, and hope it stays together.

Biscuit Joiner
May 18, 2008


funkatron3000 posted:

Nah, should be fine, at least I hope so. I used titebond 2, which is the food safe one that you use for cutting boards. If anyone knows for sure that it's a terrible idea, let me know heh.

The wax finish will also melt a bit in hot liquid, so I only used enough to soak into the wood. There's basically none on the surface.

The paddle looks great and Titetbond 2 should work fine as long as you don't leave the paddle in the hot liquid any longer than necessary. Moisture and heat is the recommended way to disassemble parts glued together with Titebond. Titebond 3 may have been a better choice since it is rated as waterproof while Titebond 2 is rated as water resistant. Both have the same food safe rating.

It will probably be fine as long as you remove the paddle while you're not stirring.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!

Biscuit Joiner posted:

The paddle looks great and Titetbond 2 should work fine as long as you don't leave the paddle in the hot liquid any longer than necessary. Moisture and heat is the recommended way to disassemble parts glued together with Titebond. Titebond 3 may have been a better choice since it is rated as waterproof while Titebond 2 is rated as water resistant. Both have the same food safe rating.

It will probably be fine as long as you remove the paddle while you're not stirring.

Excellent username/post combo.

Biscuit Joiner
May 18, 2008


fyi: Sausage gravy is the recommended adhesive for joining two biscuits together.

eta: speaking of biscuits, I've been making egg and cheese biscuits by cooking the eggs in the oven with the biscuits.





I add the eggs about six minutes before the biscuits are done. Works great and only one pan to clean.

Biscuit Joiner fucked around with this message at Mar 30, 2015 around 00:33

Nostalgia4Dogges
Jun 18, 2004

Only emojis can express my pure, simple stupidity.



Ex did everything in her power to not have to use the skillets. Even though I'd explained to her a bunch of times how to use them. She put a cover when she was making pasta in another pot on my skillet and




No wonder she's my ex

Nostalgia4Dogges fucked around with this message at Mar 30, 2015 around 00:37

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

Nostalgia4Dicks posted:

Ex did everything in her power to not have to use the skillets. Even though I'd explained to her a bunch of times how to use them. She put a cover when she was making pasta in another pot on my skillet and




No wonder she's my ex

To be fair though, unless you let it sit there for days on end, it's an easy wash and wipe to clean things like that. And if you just let it sit there for days on end....



I have people over who don't like to cook with cast iron pans, so I or they just move them into the oven when they want to cook on the stovetop.

vvv - oof. haha. I'd rather deal with a little bit of scrubbable rust than burnt-on pudding mix in a stainless steel pan.

Drifter fucked around with this message at Mar 30, 2015 around 00:45

Nostalgia4Dogges
Jun 18, 2004

Only emojis can express my pure, simple stupidity.



I didn't notice for 2 days

funkatron3000
Jun 17, 2005

Better Living Through Chemistry

Biscuit Joiner posted:

Titetbond 2 vs. Titebond 3

Good to know, appreciate the info. On the upside, if it does fall apart there's really only a couple hours of actual labor in it. Wooden utensils just don't last forever.

In other news, I got my Griswold #10 last week and just won an auction for a #2. That means I've got the full smooth bottom block logo set, 2-10. I'll post a photo of them all once I get the #2 in.


I also got a really odd Griswold piece with some really cool history to talk about later...

Biscuit Joiner
May 18, 2008


No problem, I did quite a bit of research on adhesives a while back when I started building this teardrop camper in what used to be my kitchen. I really need a garage.

More woodworking in the cast iron thread (some of my cast iron is hanging on the wall in the second picture though).





The date on the picture is wrong but this has been a multi year project. I'm quite a bit further along than these pictures. I need to take some new ones.

Bob Saget IRL
Oct 24, 2014



Dude, you should make a thread wherever appropriate for woodworking. You said you made cutting boards, and I'd probabky have questions about that. Plus, it looks like you got some cool stuff to show off and talk about.

Or just keep posting here, because its awesome. Id def like to see how that trailer is coming along.

Bob Saget IRL fucked around with this message at Mar 30, 2015 around 02:31

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

You're a credit to your community!

Yeah post that poo poo here.

Dr. Pangloss
Apr 5, 2014


Biscuit Joiner posted:

fyi: Sausage gravy is the recommended adhesive for joining two biscuits together.

eta: speaking of biscuits, I've been making egg and cheese biscuits by cooking the eggs in the oven with the biscuits.





I add the eggs about six minutes before the biscuits are done. Works great and only one pan to clean.

That looks amazing.

Booyah-
Dec 21, 2004



Yeah that looks delicious. How much fat do you use to keep the eggs from sticking?

Biscuit Joiner
May 18, 2008


^^^ I just put a small pat of butter in before the eggs and they don't stick at all. The pan is very well seasoned though.

My progress on the trailer is so slow a thread of it's own would die pretty quick so here is what I've done so far. It's hard getting good pictures since I'm building it in my kitchen and there isn't a whole lot of extra room.

I bought this book to get some ideas,
Teardrops and Tiny Trailers by Douglas Heister



And drew some rough plans of what I wanted




A lot of people start with a bolt together Harbor Freight trailer but they are pretty expensive for what you get. I used to work building and repairing utility trailers so I built this one from scrap steel that was laying around the shop.


Scrap steel and "junk" parts. Springs and wheel hubs from an old boat trailer. Tires and wheels came free from another trailer shop that we would do aluminum welding and build axles for.


Trailer frame at home in my kitchen


Most people use plywood for the floor of the trailer and cover it with paint or tar. I used these two sheets of HDPE (high density polyethylene, cutting board material) so there would be no chance of the floor rotting. They were leftover from making industrial cutting dies so they were free as well.


Used a router to cut down the end so they would overlap to seal out moisture and air.


HDPE installed and the floor framing.


Insulation in the floor


I built the walls at the shop (more room) and brought them home in an enclosed trailer.


Some of my cast iron helping to weigh down the plywood for the flooor while the glue sets.Passenger side wall in the background. Look at that awesome avocado colored stove.


Putting in the horizontal braces.



Paneling installed on the inside of the front and roof. The wood wouldn't make the bend there so I have some heavy plastic that will fill in those areas. They will be hidden by shelves on the inside and the aluminum skin on the outside.

I'm currently building the cabinets and shelve for the galley in the rear of the trailer. There is still a lot of work to do.

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008






Slippery Tilde

How are you going to get it out of the kitchen? Disassemble it again?

Biscuit Joiner
May 18, 2008


No need to take it apart. My kitchen has double doors so there is just enough room to get back out.

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008






Slippery Tilde

By the way the penny just dropped on your name.

MrYenko
Jun 17, 2012

#2 isn't ALWAYS bad...


Biscuit Joiner posted:

fyi: Sausage gravy is the recommended adhesive for joining two biscuits together.

eta: speaking of biscuits, I've been making egg and cheese biscuits by cooking the eggs in the oven with the biscuits.





I add the eggs about six minutes before the biscuits are done. Works great and only one pan to clean.

I need to come to your house for breakfast. For science.

Biscuit Joiner
May 18, 2008


spankmeister posted:

By the way the penny just dropped on your name.

Yeah, it's a reference to the tool. Confusing with this being the cooking subforum.



MrYenko posted:

I need to come to your house for breakfast. For science.

Bring some bacon or sausage and we can science the poo poo out of it. I'll even dress up like Bill Nye


I had been wanting a nice saucepan for a long time and I received a Le Creuset pan (the orange one) for Christmas. A few weeks after that I found the blue one (also Le Creuset) at an indoor flea market for $2.00, no lid but I couldn't pass it up for the price. It's in great shape other than a few small chips in the enamel on the outside. A few weeks after that I found the small black skillet (Le Creuset) at the same flea market for $6.00. I really need to stop buying cast iron, 28 pieces so far.

QuarkMartial
Sep 25, 2004
[This Space for Rent]

Using my skillets on the grill for the first time tonight to cook some vegetables. Not sure why I haven't thought to do this before.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Biscuit Joiner posted:

I really need to stop buying cast iron, 28 pieces so far.



Never. That stuff will be gold post-apocalypse. The color is amazingly funky as well.

Gegil
Jun 22, 2012

Smoke'em if you Got'em

Biscuit Joiner posted:

Bring some bacon or sausage and we can science the poo poo out of it. I'll even dress up like Bill Nye


Cooking Cosplay Goon meet 2015 for Science!


.... wait. is this a way to get free labor for your trailer?
It puts the lotion on the aluminum skin or it gets the hose again!

funkatron3000
Jun 17, 2005

Better Living Through Chemistry

It took a few years, but the collection is complete. #2-#10 of the smooth bottom large block logo pans.







That's cool and all, but I wanted some neat little Griswold thing to cap off the collection.

In 1951, the city of Erie, PA held a centennial parade to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the city's incorporation. Griswold had a float in the parade and handed out 2,000 small cast iron pups with "Griswold pup" on the back and the number "30" on the back of the head. They were the only ones ever made, so people collect them. To complicate things though, around 2005 a bunch of crappy reproductions from China hit the market. You can tell them apart because the casting quality is really poor - rough surface and grinding marks.

In 1980, a couple named Bill & Denise Harned bought a few of these pups from an antique store in Erie for their personal collection. Five years later they went on to author the first book on Griswold cast iron, "Griswold Cast Collectibles - History and Values". There are newer better books now, but it was first, which is cool.

Welp, they put one of their pups up for sale and I bought it.







And now it sits on my desk at work.

Teeter
Jul 21, 2005

Hey guys! I'm having a good time, what about you?



That's seriously an impressive collection and a neat bit of history that takes those pans way beyond being a simple hunk of metal that makes food hot

Teeter fucked around with this message at Apr 2, 2015 around 17:41

KingShiro
Jan 10, 2008

EH?!?!?!


funkatron3000 posted:

It took a few years, but the collection is complete. #2-#10 of the smooth bottom large block logo pans.







That's cool and all, but I wanted some neat little Griswold thing to cap off the collection.

In 1951, the city of Erie, PA held a centennial parade to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the city's incorporation. Griswold had a float in the parade and handed out 2,000 small cast iron pups with "Griswold pup" on the back and the number "30" on the back of the head. They were the only ones ever made, so people collect them. To complicate things though, around 2005 a bunch of crappy reproductions from China hit the market. You can tell them apart because the casting quality is really poor - rough surface and grinding marks.

In 1980, a couple named Bill & Denise Harned bought a few of these pups from an antique store in Erie for their personal collection. Five years later they went on to author the first book on Griswold cast iron, "Griswold Cast Collectibles - History and Values". There are newer better books now, but it was first, which is cool.

Welp, they put one of their pups up for sale and I bought it.







And now it sits on my desk at work.

Huh my city isn't completely lame after all.

Biscuit Joiner
May 18, 2008



That is a fantastic collection. Do you use them or are they decorative pieces only?

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


[quote="funkatron3000" post="443560733"

And now it sits on my desk at work.
[/quote]

Oh man I want a Griswold pup so bad. I'd even take a cheap repro ( if sold as a repro and cheap)

funkatron3000
Jun 17, 2005

Better Living Through Chemistry

Biscuit Joiner posted:

That is a fantastic collection. Do you use them or are they decorative pieces only?

Thanks! They all get used, but the 9 and 10 get used the most.

Planet X
Dec 10, 2003

GOOD MORNING

I have two questions,

- I have a lodge logic enameled dutch oven. How to clean it? I poked around the web a bit, and it seems that a little abrasive such as barkeeper's friend or bon ami with the rough side of a sponge + plenty of elbow grease should do the trick. I used that and vinegar, and was able to get a little of the dark stains out of the enamel cooking surface. Any other tricks or tips? I'm going to go back over it a few more times and see if I can't get it any better. I've had it for so long, it's long overdue for a scrubbing.

- I asked previously about stripping cast iron. Oven on cleaning cycle out of the question because it'll stink up the house and our oven doesn't have a clean cycle. A few recommended putting them in the grill for a while. I was going to consider the lye method to strip them before reseasoning, but I can't find regular lye at the store. I figured I'd get some off of amazon, some gloves and goggles, and put it all in a bag and let it work its magic. Anyone done this?

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Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.

Boiling a baking soda solution has worked well for me, at least on fresh stains.

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