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Pick
Jul 19, 2009


Nap Ghost

Thank you for turtle charity

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PathAsc
Nov 15, 2011

Hail SS-18 Satan may he cleanse us with nuclear fire

PISS TAPE IS REAL


Forgot to post mice day!

Noodle getting real good at constricting and consuming!



Shiny enjoyed his meeces too, but I was feeding him so no pics unfortunately. Here's today though:



FEED ME WHILE I AT YOU, MY SMOOTHSKIN FOODSLAVE

GreenBuckanneer
Sep 15, 2007




Maybe I should get a beardie in the future. I like my leopard gecko but IDK if you can put them next to each other.

also in case anyone cares, petco/petsmart are "essential" open retail chains right now for food.

Bobbaganoosh
Jun 23, 2004

...kinda catchy...

j3rkstore posted:

Let me know if this isn't the right thread for this but can anyone help me identify this little guy? I'm in North Carolina and want to make sure its not a baby Copperhead. I was thinking maybe Texas Brown?

TIA



Your ID is spot on. Depending on what range maps say (which vary), as subspecies go, it's probably the Northern Brown Snake, aka "Dekay's Snake" if you're in NC. It's a very harmless slug and worm-eater that tops out at a little over a foot in length. Unlikely to bite, and even then less likely to break the skin. What they can do is musk quite terribly well, a foul cloacal smearing that honestly makes their utterly trivial bite preferable. I have had one (out of several dozens) bite me, but was only impressed that it even bothered trying.

Baby copperheads are much more stout, have elliptical pupils, and bear dark hourglass-shaped banded saddles across their backs. Copperheads, like most pit vipers, are quite stout. Think plumpy sausages with noticeably triagulated heads. Dekays/brown snakes are pretty common in backyards. They would turn up frequently when raking leaves as they like to lurk under dead vegetation. In fact raking leaves, I find, is the best way to find that species.

seance snacks
Mar 29, 2007



Cross-posted from the Critterquest thread, thought it would go well here.

I'd forgotten all about these, but found them when I was going through an old SD card. These were taken a few years ago in the central VA area.







PathAsc
Nov 15, 2011

Hail SS-18 Satan may he cleanse us with nuclear fire

PISS TAPE IS REAL


Ooooooh, thank you for those!

dwarf74
Sep 2, 2012



Buglord

My kid's pastel ball wanted to say hi.

Is putting the head up to look around common for balls? He's the first ball I've ever known to do this.


HungryMedusa
Apr 27, 2003

Sometimes you want to ride the roller coaster twice and you don’t wanna wait in line.


Very common. They call it telescoping. Cute snke!

dwarf74
Sep 2, 2012



Buglord

HungryMedusa posted:

Very common. They call it telescoping. Cute snke!
Nice. I can't believe I never saw it on a ball before.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

why would they call it telescoping instead of periscoping?

Anyway just a heads-up: amazon is running low on options for powdered crested gecko diet. There's still a few brands and flavors available, but a lot less than I normally see. Please don't hoard; but probably do order your normal refill amount now if you're running low. I don't know if there's possibly a supply chain interruption or if it's just people hoarding.

snake and bake
Feb 23, 2005



I always order my crestie food (Pangea) directly from the source at pangeareptile.com. Just checked and they all seem to be in stock.

There are plenty of other reptile supply sites out there too - so why order reptile food from Amazon? Serious question.

HungryMedusa
Apr 27, 2003

Sometimes you want to ride the roller coaster twice and you don’t wanna wait in line.


It should be periscoping. Corrina agrees.



HungryMedusa fucked around with this message at 19:48 on Mar 29, 2020

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



I donít know why Iím surprised that gfp axolotls are readily available for hobbyists. Like it seems kind of obvious in hindsight but I really hadnít seen them outside of a lab before.

Anyway I want one now. At some point. Any reason why it would be worse than a wild type or non-gfp leuc/albino/etc standard morph?

Cowslips Warren
Oct 29, 2005

What use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy's warren and paying his price?


Grimey Drawer

Nope! Mine is just as hardy as the Lucy type.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Cowslips Warren posted:

Nope! Mine is just as hardy as the Lucy type.

Rad! How do you light them? Is there a correct/incorrect way to do so? Are they fluorescing all the time or is it a party trick that you whip out occasionally?

I know GloFish generally get hit with blue LED pretty continually during the Ďdayí half of a day/night cycle. UV is out of the question (at least continuous, long term UV is). I imagine that any heavy lighting is out of the question with axies, and especially no UV.

I have very little experience with GFP in general, and almost none in living organisms. So I have no clue what the ethics or practicalities of inducing a gfp-expressing animal to glow for my amusement are. Does the axie get stressed by it? I know scorpion keepers are generally discouraged from hitting their animals with a black light for extended periods, but again, I donít know the actual mechanics here. Like I assume the animal isnít feeling any discomfort when fluorescing.

Cowslips Warren
Oct 29, 2005

What use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy's warren and paying his price?


Grimey Drawer

I have a plant light on them, with a blue bulb that makes my one glow. That said there's also a fine layer of duckweed to help them with the light, and I flick on the blue once in a while since it's mostly only me who will see it.

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

snake and bake posted:

I always order my crestie food (Pangea) directly from the source at pangeareptile.com. Just checked and they all seem to be in stock.

There are plenty of other reptile supply sites out there too - so why order reptile food from Amazon? Serious question.
Free shipping with Prime, basically. I'm just in the habit of assuming everywhere else charges shipping. Does Pangea?

PathAsc
Nov 15, 2011

Hail SS-18 Satan may he cleanse us with nuclear fire

PISS TAPE IS REAL


I'm so glad I bought a fuckton of frozen mice for my herps last month

snake and bake
Feb 23, 2005



Yeah, it's $6.99 flat rate shipping, but the food is cheaper. Right now the 2 oz bags of mix are $7.99-8.99 on Pangea but $11.99 on Amazon.

Even if it were more expensive, I'd rather support a reptile company directly than give money to Amazon. Bezos sure doesn't need any help from me.

PathAsc
Nov 15, 2011

Hail SS-18 Satan may he cleanse us with nuclear fire

PISS TAPE IS REAL


Noodle is on his second shed, yeah!



E: WORMNOODLESIGN


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3iKKCPxQhA

PathAsc fucked around with this message at 18:30 on Apr 7, 2020

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



https://youtu.be/ICzb-ibu-Vo

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Edit: sorry about the double post. Having phone issues.

Ok Comboomer fucked around with this message at 16:50 on Apr 13, 2020

FartingBedpost
Aug 24, 2015







Any other Axie owners get little skin nubs on their Axieís belly?



Otachi has been eating well and seems happy, and the water parameters are good, but I still wanted to check.

Also my girlfriendís work gave us a temporary friend to take care of:



Meet Clyde the Pac-Man Frog! She was hibernating (?) when we got her at first, but sheís pretty active now!

FartingBedpost fucked around with this message at 09:03 on Apr 14, 2020

my cat is norris
Mar 11, 2010

#onecallcat



Toilet Rascal

Our chunky ball boy had a fantastically complete shed yesterday. The way he rubs around on things makes this a rare event.



Me for scale (I'm 5'2" on a good day).

Binary Logic
Dec 28, 2000

Wash Your Hands


Fun Shoe

Mr Burrows decided to shed in this shape which I might put some clear sealant on and use as a dish or serving tray.

beyonder
Jun 23, 2007
Beyond hardcore.

my cat is norris posted:

Our chunky ball boy had a fantastically complete shed yesterday. The way he rubs around on things makes this a rare event.



Me for scale (I'm 5'2" on a good day).

Aww a hognose. How pissy is he/she?

Goons Are Great
Nov 24, 2013

Please drink responsibly



Hello you cold blooded nerds!
I'm looking for some guidance here from herp fanatics lovers to see if you can help me figure out what to get and what to do.
Until some time ago I had snails at home, five in total, fun guys, but I had to give them away after keeping them over the winter because, boy, these guys gently caress. Literally, they are very fecund and I did not feel like releasing or murdering hundreds of baby snails every few weeks. They are in a better place now (with someone who breeds them).
As you figured, I'm into weird pets.

This situation leaves me with a solid 60x30x30cm tank, originally made as an aquarium, but for the snails it functioned very well with regular soil, too. This shall be filled with life, but I am entirely uncertain what to get. Definitely going into the herp direction here, since it's not amazingly large and I do not really have the space for something even larger, it shouldn't be too big.
I was considering getting into the frog business, since most species seem to fit into something like that, I already looked into some of the usual beginner species, the part where I'm uncertain begins when it comes to proper heating, keeping the water fresh, lighting and thus what equipment is to be recommended, fits into a tank like that or what costs I would be looking at. Another aspect from the frog end is that I have absolutely no relation in how loud they can get and whether or not that would bother me, since I have to sleep in the same room as they would.
Another possible candidate would be a small snake maybe, but what I am mostly concerned there is the size of the tank and whether or not I can really stuff one in there. Also, I'll admit, I have not yet done proper research on species and their needs yet, as I'm still in the brainstorm phase of what herp to get.
While reading this thread I also started considering a scorpion of some sort, again, I am uncertain if the tank is a proper place for one of those guys though, plus I so far barely know anything about them.

As you can see, I'm not really ruling anything out yet (lizards of some sort probably would also rock!) and have not done nearly enough reading to decide, so sorry for this "help me decide" catchall post, but I am very interested in any opinions or input you guys might have.
I've got no practical experience with reptiles, amphibians or arachnids. Disregarding my snail adventure during winter when everything was asleep, I am actually invested in the insect business; I keep a shitload of ants, various bugs, flies and used to have a mantis and other creepy stuff like that and I do have equipment for that and years of experience with any and all kind of small living things, at least. As such, I am already used to no one coming to my house.

my cat is norris
Mar 11, 2010

#onecallcat



Toilet Rascal

beyonder posted:

Aww a hognose. How pissy is he/she?

She gets pretty huffy and puffy but she's not too bad. Once I'm holding her she usually settles down, it's the picking up part that makes her mad!

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007







Smellrose

Goons Are Great posted:

Hello you cold blooded nerds!
I'm looking for some guidance here from herp fanatics lovers to see if you can help me figure out what to get and what to do.
Until some time ago I had snails at home, five in total, fun guys, but I had to give them away after keeping them over the winter because, boy, these guys gently caress. Literally, they are very fecund and I did not feel like releasing or murdering hundreds of baby snails every few weeks. They are in a better place now (with someone who breeds them).
As you figured, I'm into weird pets.

This situation leaves me with a solid 60x30x30cm tank, originally made as an aquarium, but for the snails it functioned very well with regular soil, too. This shall be filled with life, but I am entirely uncertain what to get. Definitely going into the herp direction here, since it's not amazingly large and I do not really have the space for something even larger, it shouldn't be too big.
I was considering getting into the frog business, since most species seem to fit into something like that, I already looked into some of the usual beginner species, the part where I'm uncertain begins when it comes to proper heating, keeping the water fresh, lighting and thus what equipment is to be recommended, fits into a tank like that or what costs I would be looking at. Another aspect from the frog end is that I have absolutely no relation in how loud they can get and whether or not that would bother me, since I have to sleep in the same room as they would.
Another possible candidate would be a small snake maybe, but what I am mostly concerned there is the size of the tank and whether or not I can really stuff one in there. Also, I'll admit, I have not yet done proper research on species and their needs yet, as I'm still in the brainstorm phase of what herp to get.
While reading this thread I also started considering a scorpion of some sort, again, I am uncertain if the tank is a proper place for one of those guys though, plus I so far barely know anything about them.

As you can see, I'm not really ruling anything out yet (lizards of some sort probably would also rock!) and have not done nearly enough reading to decide, so sorry for this "help me decide" catchall post, but I am very interested in any opinions or input you guys might have.
I've got no practical experience with reptiles, amphibians or arachnids. Disregarding my snail adventure during winter when everything was asleep, I am actually invested in the insect business; I keep a shitload of ants, various bugs, flies and used to have a mantis and other creepy stuff like that and I do have equipment for that and years of experience with any and all kind of small living things, at least. As such, I am already used to no one coming to my house.

You're kind of all over the place, but I'll try. That tank is too small for most larger lizards, but could be OK for small sedentary ones like leopard geckos. Frogs or other amphibians could work OK if you set up proper environmental control, but I know of no frog species that does not at least occasionally call, and frog calls are often quite loud. I find them pleasant but still wouldn't really want to sleep in the same room as calling frogs. You could do an axlotl or newt or other aquatic species which I believe are fairly silent.

I will say this: herps potentially cost way more than the nominal cost of a tank, and most of them, the purchase price is also trivial. Compared to? A single visit to an exotic vet for any reason at all. What I am hinting at here is that you shouldn't really start from your tank size and then decide what to get, unless that tank is the largest you're able and willing to keep in your home; it's better to decide what pet you want, and then determine whether your current tank is OK or you need a different one. The cost of changing to a larger tank is fairly small compared to the overall cost of ownership of a herp, accounting for climate control equipment, food, energy costs, and especially vet care.

There are some pretty cheap herps to buy and keep, though. I have kept firebellied toads, for example, and my brother once kept a firebellied newt (no relation). In both cases, a water setup with stones or sand, filter (always on and running), live feeder insects provided once or twice a week, and regular water changes, plus a reasonable lamp, and it was good for years. Decades even. If you're willing to breed your own feeder insects (sounds like you probably are), that drops the cost some more, too. Depends on if you're willing to, for example, pay $150 to take a $5 toad to a vet to deal with an impaction or infection or something, or just try to look up symptoms, treat at home, and take your chances, like most people would do with (say) a goldfish.

That's another thing. Lots of herps are capable of living for ten or twenty or more years, if well kept. Do not take lightly your decision to buy a lizard, snake, frog, etc. Some are shorter-lived (veiled chameleons, for example, typically live 4-6 years), but yeah, just be aware you're making a longer committment than you might be accustomed to thinking of for like snails or whatever. I have a firebellied toad that is 16 years old and counting now, and my most recently-deceased poison dart frog was at least 13 or 14. My crested geckos are mostly 12-15 by now too, and showing no particular signs of age, who knows how much longer they'll live, it could be 10+ more years?

Ultimately I think it comes down to: what do you want? Many species are nocturnal. Do you want to watch them do behavior during your waking hours? Do you want multiple interacting animals, or a loner? Do you want one with lots of energy and movement (fun, but usually requires more habitat space) or are you OK with an animal that spends 95% of its time curled up in a ball in a hide? Do you want a pet you can take out and handle and maybe even let roam around your room, or would you prefer one that stays in its tank 100% of the time and you never touch it? Do you want a pet that would be a "talking point" with others who could come to your home and ooh and aah over it, or something people would be indifferent to, or you're OK with an animal that many people are frightened or repulsed by? Do you want to breed and sell your own? Do you want to completely avoid the possibility of offspring? Are you OK with full-on climate control (humidity, temp, lighting, airflow) or do you want to limit how much humming, buzzing, spraying, brightly-lit poo poo you have going on in your bedroom?

So many factors I can't begin to make recommendations. You're gonna need to narrow things down some.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Has OP considered some of the larger and more interesting Arthropoda? Iím thinking like an emperor scorp or tarantula.

That enclosure size seems really good for a large scorp or active rancho. Theyíre probably some of the easier animals to take care of if youíre good with handling feeder bugs and arenít scared of them. Most hobby-available arachnids are way less work and easier to keep alive than your average reptile/amphibian.

And with tarantulas thereís so much behavioral and phenotype variability between heavy webbers/arboreals/terrestrials/hunters/etc.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011
I got chased out of the Monster Hunter thread for garbage posting, now I shit up other Games threads with useless low-effort uninformed aggro noise. I somehow think "VN nerds" are beneath me and I belong on your ignore list.

Ok Comboomer posted:

Theyíre probably some of the easier animals to take care of if youíre good with handling feeder bugs and arenít scared of them.
And if you're already uncomfortable with the idea of routinely handling live crickets or other harmless food bugs, then keeping a much larger arthropod as a pet is probably just not a good idea in general.

Goons Are Great
Nov 24, 2013

Please drink responsibly



Leperflesh posted:

You're kind of all over the place, but I'll try.

So many factors I can't begin to make recommendations. You're gonna need to narrow things down some.

Sorry for being so unspecified, for a month or two my mind is flying around "Hmm herp or something would be nice!" and barely went beyond that. Obviously that's not a position to make a decision from - especially due to their lifetime, you're entirely right there, I might not have factored that in well enough -, hence why I'm looking for some input to limit my choices.

However, you already make a lot of good points! I'll try to be more specific with the notes you gave:
The costs are a factor, but not a deciding one. The reason I mentioned the tank in the first place is because it was my mental hook to even consider it, I'm entirely happy to replace it with something fundamentally different if I'm sold on a pet that I want to properly keep and that needs something else. I do breed feeder insects (fruit flies and meal worms for the ants currently, got plenty of setup option to expand on that in whatever direction, basically anything up to small rodents) myself, however I am lacking a setup for actual climate control as my insects are fine with the regular central European climate we have without separate light, humidity and temperature control.

In general, especially regarding my existing pets, I don't really keep them to cuddle or interact with them, hell, my hand gets covered in venom and bitten by attacking ants every few days. I want to get them because I find them incredibly interesting and I'm entirely fine with them being inactive. I don't care if it's a talking point for others or if they're scared of them (I usually avoid telling guests about my fruit fly farm and how nasty that is), as long as I'm fascinated by them.
On that note, my biggest interests in how they live, feed and grow is probably arachnids, frogs and snakes.
Calling frogs, however, may or may not be a deal breaker depending on the frequency and the actual volume they have - usually I'm quite tolerant with sleeping with noise, but doing so for years to come might not be ideal, so I'd take a step back from that option.

I do not wish to breed or sell them, generally with the snails (who breed all the time with a few weeks in between and each of them can also grow up to 10 years) I realized that offspring in general is not something I want to get in, if possible.
Basic climate control is entirely fine, I'd prefer not to go full tropical though, to at least limit all of the things going on. As far as I read about it so far, that also tends to be a thing (correct me if it's not like that) for many frogs and is another contra point for them.

So, basically I'm looking for a typically rather easy to keep, interesting frog, snake or arachnid where breeding is not a notable thing and sensible climate control systems are not necessarily needed. Nocturnal or generally calm/inactive is super fine, disgust or wow!s by other are not part of the question and if it fits in the existing tank and/or maybe even works more or less in conjunction with the feeding insects and tools I already have, that's a nice bonus, but entirely optional.

Ok Comboomer posted:

Has OP considered some of the larger and more interesting Arthropoda? I’m thinking like an emperor scorp or tarantula.

That enclosure size seems really good for a large scorp or active rancho. They’re probably some of the easier animals to take care of if you’re good with handling feeder bugs and aren’t scared of them. Most hobby-available arachnids are way less work and easier to keep alive than your average reptile/amphibian.

And with tarantulas there’s so much behavioral and phenotype variability between heavy webbers/arboreals/terrestrials/hunters/etc.
I have, briefly! They're not only on the table but actually one of my favorite options currently. A friend of mine owns a tarantula and I am always fascinated by it.
A scorpion is even more interesting for me, but I have barely any idea on what they need, what the setup needs to look like, what they usually eat and how the climate needs to be, so I'm gonna need to read up on that more, but even getting into just one family seems so overwhelming with options and fascinating stories and their abilities.

Goons Are Great fucked around with this message at 19:36 on Apr 21, 2020

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Cardiovorax posted:

And if you're already uncomfortable with the idea of routinely handling live crickets or other harmless food bugs, then keeping a much larger arthropod as a pet is probably just not a good idea in general.

Well letís just see what op said about themselves....

Goons Are Great posted:

Disregarding my snail adventure during winter when everything was asleep, I am actually invested in the insect business; I keep a shitload of ants, various bugs, flies and used to have a mantis and other creepy stuff like that and I do have equipment for that and years of experience with any and all kind of small living things, at least. As such, I am already used to no one coming to my house.

Nope, youíre right. Totally not for them.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011
I got chased out of the Monster Hunter thread for garbage posting, now I shit up other Games threads with useless low-effort uninformed aggro noise. I somehow think "VN nerds" are beneath me and I belong on your ignore list.

Sorry, I didn't mean anyone in particular by that. No offense intended, I just thought the phrasing was kind of funny. It probably is a good idea to not be scared of little feeder bugs if you plan to keep something as comparatively intimidating as a huge scorpion or spider.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Goons Are Great posted:

I have, briefly! They're not only on the table but actually one of my favorite options currently. A friend of mine owns a tarantula and I am always fascinated by it.
A scorpion is even more interesting for me, but I have barely any idea on what they need, what the setup needs to look like, what they usually eat and how the climate needs to be, so I'm gonna need to read up on that more, but even getting into just one family seems so overwhelming with options and fascinating stories and their abilities.

Both are gonna be super easy and require minimal work into the setup. Youíll need substrate of some sort, maybe a hide or 2 the structure of which will depend largely on whether the substrate is part of the hide, a water dish, and maybe (maaaaaybe) some other furnishings/plants/etc if thereís space and you desire it.

Ultimately itíll depend on what species of scorp/spider and whether theyíre desert specific, plains/pampas, forest, arboreal, burrowers, etc. Something like an emperor scorp needs clean coco fiber/eco earth/soil, a half log hide, a teeny tiny water dish, and thatís basically it. Room temp is more than adequate for most beginner crawlies.

Cardiovorax posted:

Sorry, I didn't mean anyone in particular by that. No offense intended, I just thought the phrasing was kind of funny. It probably is a good idea to not be scared of little feeder bugs if you plan to keep something as comparatively intimidating as a huge scorpion or spider.

Apologies about coming in hot. I spend most of my time in a broken homeD&D.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011
I got chased out of the Monster Hunter thread for garbage posting, now I shit up other Games threads with useless low-effort uninformed aggro noise. I somehow think "VN nerds" are beneath me and I belong on your ignore list.

Don't worry about it, it happens.

Cowslips Warren
Oct 29, 2005

What use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy's warren and paying his price?


Grimey Drawer

It amuses me that years ago I was terrified to pick up mealworms because what if they bite me and burrow their heads in my skin and that long body is so gross! And now it's more: gently caress, i squeezed it and guts got under my nails so my hedgehog will tear my finger off to get said hidden treat.

Cless Alvein
May 25, 2007
Bloopity Bloo

Yeah, I was in the bathroom the other day and an adult roach was crawling on the counter. Instead of grossed out, all I could do was wonder how he escaped from the bin.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011
I got chased out of the Monster Hunter thread for garbage posting, now I shit up other Games threads with useless low-effort uninformed aggro noise. I somehow think "VN nerds" are beneath me and I belong on your ignore list.

I actually used to be afraid of spiders and large insects such as crane flies. Then I decided to go on aggressive exposure self-therapy one day and spent some ten years consciously telling myself that Spiders Are Friends every time I saw one. Now I occasionally need to remind myself that no, most people do in fact not think that cockroaches are actually kind of cute, don't bring it up in public.

I'm not quite sure if I should consider it an improvement or not.

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GreenBuckanneer
Sep 15, 2007




I still don't like actually touching mealworms directly, but think it's whatever.

I wouldn't probably mind like an ant farm, just not.....ants in my house.

Because it's been warming up ants have been trying to come in no matter how clean I am and I swear to god I will burn their loving house down. Which I wont, because technically that's mine but man am I upset about that lol.

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