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Cowslips Warren
Oct 29, 2005

What use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy's warren and paying his price?



Grimey Drawer

Dapper_Swindler posted:

whats good for a leo bedding wise. I use repti carpet for both of my (separate 20 gallons with heat emiters, both healthy etc) maybe tile but i never fully trusted that either.

i use paper towls for my frogs and my crested.

I always used playsand, with a plastic shoebox with hole cut in with cocofiber for them to shed in.

Also the shoebox apparently was used by my girls as an incubator since my trio went to six geckos over the course of me keeping them! Possibly more but if the parents saw them before I did...

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Hakarne
Jul 23, 2007
Vivo en el autobús!


Alright, so I'm still having trouble with getting the ambient temperature high enough and I'm not sure what to do. I'll post a picture this time:



The right side is intended to be the hot side. I have a UTH beneath the log with a natural rock buried into the substrate touching the glass. This seems to successfully radiate heat and my IR thermometer shows the rock in that hide sits at about 88-90 degrees. I have a probe thermometer between the rock and the glass that cuts the 6x8 heat mat off when it hits 94. So I feel like I at least have the hot hide figured out! I also put a 100 Watt ceramic heat emitter above the hot side which I had hoped would raise my ambient temperature. I've had it on for 24 hours and the hottest spot I can find along the ground with my IR thermometer is 80-82 degrees. The cold side sits at 66-69 degrees, which is about the temperature in our house.

I'm hoping to get some ideas so I don't just throw hundreds of extra dollars at this and not even fix the problem. I have a few ideas but I have no idea how/if they'll actually work:

- Get a giant heat mat that takes up basically the whole underside of the tank. I think one of our bigger issues is the 2" of substrate (it's a bioactive vivarium) and sphagnum moss just dissipates most of the heat. We're in the desert so we need that moss to keep the humidity around 60%. Maybe warming all of that up will get the substrate to 75-80 degrees and then the CHE can make a proper hot side at that point. It's a 24x18x18 tank (34 gallons).

- Put a bunch of natural rocks on the hot side. Having a bunch of stones might absorb more heat and allow the ambient temperature to rise. But I don't think that's going to add 10 degrees.

- Get a second CHE, maybe even a higher wattage. I'd basically blanket the hot side/part of the middle with the emitters. But if one's barely raising the ambient temperature is another one really going to do anything?

Any thoughts are appreciated... I'm kind of at my wits end with how to heat this thing and I'm starting to think literally setting cash on fire is an easier and cheaper solution

Hakarne fucked around with this message at 18:43 on Jan 30, 2021

mango sentinel
Jan 5, 2001

H O R N E Y


So I rearranged my hognose's enclosure, took out like an inch and a half of substrate and added more hide about a week ago. Last night I went to handle and weigh him. He hasn't been losing any weight. He been getting very cranky once I put him in a deli cup but it is great for handling and I was like "maybe I'll just feed him in my hand." It worked! After a month long hunger strike he gladly monched a couple pinkies while sitting in the palm of my hand. I'm so happy.

I'm a little worried about teaching him food aggression while handling but he very calmly sniffed and slowly just opened his mouth and ate instead of attacking. I may try just feeding him in the enclosure next time and see if he's still gentle about it.

Idk it's rearranging the habitat, or that he hates deli cups but I'm so glad he finally ate.

Also have a pic of my anole being pouty.

HungryMedusa
Apr 27, 2003



Hakarne posted:

Alright, so I'm still having trouble with getting the ambient temperature high enough and I'm not sure what to do. I'll post a picture this time:



The right side is intended to be the hot side. I have a UTH beneath the log with a natural rock buried into the substrate touching the glass. This seems to successfully radiate heat and my IR thermometer shows the rock in that hide sits at about 88-90 degrees. I have a probe thermometer between the rock and the glass that cuts the 6x8 heat mat off when it hits 94. So I feel like I at least have the hot hide figured out! I also put a 100 Watt ceramic heat emitter above the hot side which I had hoped would raise my ambient temperature. I've had it on for 24 hours and the hottest spot I can find along the ground with my IR thermometer is 80-82 degrees. The cold side sits at 66-69 degrees, which is about the temperature in our house.

I'm hoping to get some ideas so I don't just throw hundreds of extra dollars at this and not even fix the problem. I have a few ideas but I have no idea how/if they'll actually work:

- Get a giant heat mat that takes up basically the whole underside of the tank. I think one of our bigger issues is the 2" of substrate (it's a bioactive vivarium) and sphagnum moss just dissipates most of the heat. We're in the desert so we need that moss to keep the humidity around 60%. Maybe warming all of that up will get the substrate to 75-80 degrees and then the CHE can make a proper hot side at that point. It's a 24x18x18 tank (34 gallons).

- Put a bunch of natural rocks on the hot side. Having a bunch of stones might absorb more heat and allow the ambient temperature to rise. But I don't think that's going to add 10 degrees.

- Get a second CHE, maybe even a higher wattage. I'd basically blanket the hot side/part of the middle with the emitters. But if one's barely raising the ambient temperature is another one really going to do anything?

Any thoughts are appreciated... I'm kind of at my wits end with how to heat this thing and I'm starting to think literally setting cash on fire is an easier and cheaper solution

Does this have screen on the top? If so, covering that with something to hold heat in everywhere except where the CHE sits will help. Even like foil tape and plastic wrap can help seal the heat in.

When I had a baby green tree python in an aquarium, I covered the sides and back with coroplast to hold the heat in. Glass lets heat escape really easily. The coroplast didn't look as good as seeing in to the cage, but it worked really well until the snake grew big enough to go in his pvc adult cage.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



anybody try keeping (mini) phalaenopsis orchids in jungle enclosures? They'd be kept either in suspended orchid medium or mounted on cork/branches

mango sentinel
Jan 5, 2001

H O R N E Y


In my (non-herp) orchid experience, they are very fussy and fragile plants, but they like moderate humidity and heat similar to New Caledonian Geckos. Phals are pretty durable compared to most species so exploring critters shouldn't be a problem. My concerns would be keeping them from getting too hot in proximity to the lights, and that they typically to need a cold snap before they will flower.

I'd suggest making some kind of removable draining cups in the enclosure so you can move it outside for cool nights a few weeks in spring and fall so it flowers.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



mango sentinel posted:

In my (non-herp) orchid experience, they are very fussy and fragile plants, but they like moderate humidity and heat similar to New Caledonian Geckos. Phals are pretty durable compared to most species so exploring critters shouldn't be a problem. My concerns would be keeping them from getting too hot in proximity to the lights, and that they typically to need a cold snap before they will flower.

I'd suggest making some kind of removable draining cups in the enclosure so you can move it outside for cool nights a few weeks in spring and fall so it flowers.

this is all like super duper down the road, and my plan would be to do it in something like a dart frog or snake or nocturnal gecko enclosure where harsh lighting/UV wouldn't be called for and most of the lighting could be handled with the same kind of mild LED grow lights that I'm currently using to supplement my plant menagerie.

Right now I just added my first couple of inexpensive NOID phals to my plant collection about a month ago just to try keeping them for a bit and hopefully getting them to reflower. Hoping to try keeping a few more interesting cultivars down the road. IDK, I've channeled my inability to keep lots of tanks over the course of living in various rentals into keeping lots of plants.

Interestingly, phals aren't native to new caledonia (but theyre all over the rest of the pacific), so I'd have to go with dendrobiums or something like that if I wanted to be a stickler for accuracy with, say, a New Cal species of gecko---and the same applies for using New World orchids with stuff like New World frogs.

But there's also something to be said for going with whatever's easiest and hardiest and cheapest in an animal enclosure, and gently caress accuracy. Lol if I'm gonna shove $200 in New Caledonian orchids in an exo terra

Hakarne
Jul 23, 2007
Vivo en el autobús!


HungryMedusa posted:

Does this have screen on the top? If so, covering that with something to hold heat in everywhere except where the CHE sits will help. Even like foil tape and plastic wrap can help seal the heat in.

When I had a baby green tree python in an aquarium, I covered the sides and back with coroplast to hold the heat in. Glass lets heat escape really easily. The coroplast didn't look as good as seeing in to the cage, but it worked really well until the snake grew big enough to go in his pvc adult cage.

Yeah it has a screen on the top. I gave aluminum foil covering the screen a shot to see if something like that would work and it didn’t have any noticeable impact on temps. I just ordered a heat pad that’ll cover a full half of the bottom of the tank (17.5x9.5). It’s adjustable too so hopefully I’ll be able to find a good balance with it. Hopefully that works, if not I guess I’ll just have to blanket it with 150w CHEs or something.

Fluffy Bunnies
Jan 9, 2009

FUCK





So, I think my 15+ year old corn is finally on her way out. She's been having some balance issues and the vet really can't find anything wrong. Of course, the vet basically goes "wow, a kingsnake!" so... yeah.

I'm focusing on making Harley happy and well-fed while she occasionally needs a little help slithering around upright. She's been doing better as of late, but there are still bad days. Anything y'all can think of on a soft derp bucket list?

Hakarne
Jul 23, 2007
Vivo en el autobús!


We got our temps and environment stabilized, so here's Roulette the Ball Python!



So far he seems to be doing pretty good. He was a bit... longer than we thought he'd be (probably close to 2.5 ft). He came from a rack system to a glass bio-active vivarium so we were worried how he'd handle it but he seems to be adjusting pretty well. He sleeps all day under his cool hide which is about 78-80 degrees but he'll come out not long after his "sun" goes down - we have a full-spectrum light that we turned on (12 on/12 off) starting during his 3rd day in the tank. We wanted to swap out his cool side enclosure as it seems like it'd be too small for him, but he somehow manages to cram himself in there . Sometimes he's lifting it up a bit and part of his body bulges out from underneath. He tends to do some glass surfing and checks out the mesh top when he first comes out, but he does seem to spend most of his active time enjoying (if snakes "enjoy" things) all the different plants, terrains, and textures in the vivarium. He doesn't really seem to care for a hot hide though so I'm not sure if he just doesn't need it or doesn't like it. We thought it might be too small or the wrong shape as it was a buried half log so we swapped it for a mid-size cave. I used a probe to measure the air temps in there and it sits at about 85.5-86 degrees, and the IR thermometer shows ~86-88 degrees on the ground in there. is there anything wrong with that? He seems to prefer going under his CHE on the hot side while he's exploring at night then quickly resuming whatever snake thing he's doing. The only time we've seen him come out to warm up during the day was when I misted the enclosure to get the humidity back up. He poked around for a few minutes, sat in his basking spot, then went back to sleep in his cool hide.

We tried to feed him on about day 4 as it looked like he may have been in a hunting phase the previous night - it seemed that he was more actively probing around on the bottom of his cage especially in the burrow-esque warm hide we established under his driftwood. The breeder said they fed him a smaller meal ahead of shipping and that he really loves to eat so we thought it possible he may take it despite the shipping and all the changes. They said he'd take either a large mouse or a rat pup F/T so I tried a large mouse as my online order of rat pups hadn't come in yet and the store here was also out of rats . We had it thawing in a bag on top of his vivarium and he went right up and was staring at that spot. I dangled it with tongs as the breeder demonstrated and he lunged at it... and missed. After researching I think it might have been because I was holding it in a way that his CHE was directly behind the mouse so apparently that can throw off their tracking. Oops! After that he went back to his cool hide then came out about an hour later and was again staring where the mouse was thawing on the vivarium. I warmed it up more and tried again, he would track it and sorta acted interested but never actually went after it. How long should I wait before trying again? I'm thinking of waiting 2 days, but should I wait a full week instead? Online advice seems split between trying again after 1-2 days or just waiting a week until the next normal feeding time.

So TLDR/questions:

- Temperatures range from 78-80 in his cool hide to 86-88 in his hot hide. We don't think he has used his hot hide yet but likes to bask on the hot side - temps there are ~86 but go up to 90 in the area according to the IR thermometer. Should we be concerned he hasn't used his hot hide?
- He sleeps all day in his cool hide then comes out and explores when the lights are off which seems like good, non-stressed behavior. The cool hide seems too small for him (sometimes he's lifting it up and bulging out from underneath it) but he seems to prefer it. Would we do more harm than good by swapping it out?
- He struck at a mouse and missed, possibly due to me having his prey backdropped by the CHE. How long should I wait until I try again?

Edit: The cool hide in question. We got it before we realized they tend to prefer a single opening, but it's his favorite. He kinda propped it up on sphagnum moss so it's not exactly resting on him, but sometimes you can see part of his body underneath the front right. I'm still amazed that he can fit in it and more amazed that it's his favorite spot



Edit 2: Of course the day after I post this we woke up to him asleep in his hot hide . We also covered the hole in the middle of his cool hide for more security/weight and secured the bottom with more substrate so he’s not lifting it up.

Hakarne fucked around with this message at 18:56 on Feb 15, 2021

manero
Jan 30, 2006





My leopard gecko is 20 (or is it 21??) years old, last year he lost sight in one eye, and recently seemed like he lost interest in food.

I ended up putting some mealworms in front of his face with tweezers, and he went for it, and I ended up feeding him maybe 5 to 7 of them.

So it seems like he is almost completely blind in the other eye as well, maybe except for a tiny little bit left, and even then, I need to be practically waving the mealworm in front of his nose for him to go after it.

Any suggestions for feeding an elderly, blind leopard gecko?

Edit: pic because why not, he’s a good lookin guy

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



oh bless

elderly leopard gecko 😭

I think you’re gonna have to tong feed him from now on. Maybe try to normalize a schedule so he gets used to you offering food at roughly the same time every day or two

not sure how often he was eating before

fuzzy_logic
May 2, 2009

unfortunately hideous and irreverislbe



Question about tarantula enclosures:

I'm looking for an enclosure for a neoholothele incei, they like to burrow and web the gently caress out of their homes. I'm torn between getting a lower-profile enclosure since they're fossorial, this would seem to make sense and be cheaper, but I'm concerned because after putting in 2-3 inches of substrate to burrow in, the ones I'm seeing in videos and stuff online have webbed the entire top half of the thing to the point where ventilation holes are blocked and sometimes the door on top is even webbed shut. They also have a reputation for coming zooming out the top door when its opened and having the web right there seems to make escapes a lot easier. I feel like 3 inches for substrate, allow 2-3 for them to web up, and another 3 inches on top would be ideal but I feel like I may be overrreacting and now the I'm looking at vertical enclosures for a spider that likes to stay in its burrow. Is there any reason not to leave a few inches extra at the top of the enclosure, or is this just too big of a box now? Or am I overthinking it?

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



fuzzy_logic posted:

Question about tarantula enclosures:

I'm looking for an enclosure for a neoholothele incei, they like to burrow and web the gently caress out of their homes. I'm torn between getting a lower-profile enclosure since they're fossorial, this would seem to make sense and be cheaper, but I'm concerned because after putting in 2-3 inches of substrate to burrow in, the ones I'm seeing in videos and stuff online have webbed the entire top half of the thing to the point where ventilation holes are blocked and sometimes the door on top is even webbed shut. They also have a reputation for coming zooming out the top door when its opened and having the web right there seems to make escapes a lot easier. I feel like 3 inches for substrate, allow 2-3 for them to web up, and another 3 inches on top would be ideal but I feel like I may be overrreacting and now the I'm looking at vertical enclosures for a spider that likes to stay in its burrow. Is there any reason not to leave a few inches extra at the top of the enclosure, or is this just too big of a box now? Or am I overthinking it?

almost always best to err on giving the animal more space than you think it needs. At worst you have to downsize the enclosure. With a rancho that does a lot of webbing I'd want to give it as much space for that as possible, and give myself as many places to put rocks/branches/etc as possible for it to have web targets. The more space the spider has the more dramatic and elaborate and attractive the web is going to be for you. Same thing goes with the tunnel, to a certain extent. If the spider doesn't have enough room to build out a nice tunnel+web and they're smooshed in then they're both going to look like rear end.

I don't think it's at all inappropriate to have a deep enclosure for a burrowing/webbing spider. Unless you're talking about a sling that you're afraid of losing or drying out or whatever get the biggest cage you can afford. Always get the biggest cage you can afford

fuzzy_logic
May 2, 2009

unfortunately hideous and irreverislbe



Ok Comboomer posted:

almost always best to err on giving the animal more space than you think it needs. At worst you have to downsize the enclosure. With a rancho that does a lot of webbing I'd want to give it as much space for that as possible, and give myself as many places to put rocks/branches/etc as possible for it to have web targets. The more space the spider has the more dramatic and elaborate and attractive the web is going to be for you. Same thing goes with the tunnel, to a certain extent. If the spider doesn't have enough room to build out a nice tunnel+web and they're smooshed in then they're both going to look like rear end.

I don't think it's at all inappropriate to have a deep enclosure for a burrowing/webbing spider. Unless you're talking about a sling that you're afraid of losing or drying out or whatever get the biggest cage you can afford. Always get the biggest cage you can afford

Ok, that makes sense - I wasn't sure if it was something where they like being a little smooshed in and freak out with too much space. So many people seem to keep them in these cramped little boxes. For the acrylic enclosures the extra size isn't even much more expensive.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



fuzzy_logic posted:

Ok, that makes sense - I wasn't sure if it was something where they like being a little smooshed in and freak out with too much space. So many people seem to keep them in these cramped little boxes.

that’s usually more because people want to have more spiders than anything else

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






There are very few animals in nature that get freaked out by the size of nature itself. Too much exposure can be a thing, e.g. my gecko doesn't like to have four walls and a ceiling of glass that makes it feel vulnerable as a prey animal, but a large vivarium with lots of cover is far better for that gecko than a small one, all else being equal.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Ok Comboomer posted:

that’s usually more because people want to have more spiders than anything else
This makes me wonder, now that I think about it. Can spiders even become neurotic in behaviour due to cramped conditions? Intuitively, I'd say they don't really have enough of a mind for it, but it's not like I'm a spider psychologist.

fuzzy_logic
May 2, 2009

unfortunately hideous and irreverislbe



Thanks for the advice, I got a pretty big and tall box ("big" in this case meaning like, eight inches). From another forum, here's what this species is able to do given plenty of space and anchor points, so that's exciting:



ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





Lipstick Apathy

Missed enclosure chat, but for burrowing tarantulas, I loved the rubbermaid cereal containers. These: https://www.meijer.com/shop/en/kitc...SkaArrlEALw_wcB

Can use a hot nail to melt airholes as big or small as needed.

fuzzy_logic
May 2, 2009

unfortunately hideous and irreverislbe



herp thread help, I just want to show all my friends and acquaintances how adorable my new spiderfriend is and they just keep screaming and refusing to look at pictures? Who could hate that fuzzy little crosseyed fwace?

Goons Are Great
Jan 1, 1970

Well yeah, but honestly..



I've been wondering that since the day I got my many-legged friends. Recently I expanded from scorpion, black widow, ants and roaches to a centipede and somehow this even scares off people who usually are fine with 8 legs.
Just not a lot of love out there for these majestic and beautiful creatures

fuzzy_logic
May 2, 2009

unfortunately hideous and irreverislbe



Goons Are Great posted:

I've been wondering that since the day I got my many-legged friends. Recently I expanded from scorpion, black widow, ants and roaches to a centipede and somehow this even scares off people who usually are fine with 8 legs.
Just not a lot of love out there for these majestic and beautiful creatures

I admit to having a really hard time with vinegaroons and other spindly friends, but I read up on them and learned the spindly bits are just probes like feelers and they're basically harmless to humans, so now I think of them as pretty and fragile instead of spooky. I did hear somewhere that therapists used to advise people to get tarantulas to get over their arachnophobia and that just sounds like a recipe for disaster all around. I can just picture someone panicking and hurting the spider by accident and feeling awful about it even though they couldn't help the flinching response.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Goons Are Great posted:

I've been wondering that since the day I got my many-legged friends. Recently I expanded from scorpion, black widow, ants and roaches to a centipede and somehow this even scares off people who usually are fine with 8 legs.
Just not a lot of love out there for these majestic and beautiful creatures

centipedes are the hots of the arthropod keeping world

a lot of keepers of other arthropods, etc won't gently caress with them for either valid or hyperbolic/unrealistic reasons ("it's not a question of if it will escape, it's a question of when", etc)

ZarathustraFollower
Mar 14, 2009





Lipstick Apathy

We had a Texas giant centipede as part of our outreach collection. During one of our wars against fruit flies that involved daily cage rotates, there was an accident that resulted in it being put in with 2 adult emperor scorpions (centipede had burrowed deep in the substrate, tech thought it was an empty tank).

It killed both scorpions and had mostly eaten one by the next morning. Centipedes are crazy.

Goons Are Great
Jan 1, 1970

Well yeah, but honestly..



Oh yeah I wouldn't ever gently caress with him, I've seen him hunt. It's quite stressfree to have him, he got a big enclosure and is usually busy redecorating most of it, he doesn't eat much either, so there's no reason for me to open the door more often than necessary, which is mostly keeping him and the substrate moist and happy, as well as the small invertebrates he lives with.

I wouldn't dream of disturbing him and the one exciting moment I had was when I had to refill some additional substrate to make it better to burrow for him, he almost got out twice just by me not paying perfect attention.
These guys are relentless, insanely fast, more flexible than any snake, in his case quite venomous and I have no intention to ever get in his way or do anything he doesn't like. In exchange for this distance, I get to have him, he's a gorgeous shining red dragon and occasionally I hear the sound of him obliterating the exoskeleton of his prey shortly before devouring it in record time.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

I believe all centipedes are venomous, so that's something to be aware of as a matter of general principle. Even if they're not really dangerous to an animal the size of a human normally, anaphylactic shock is always a possibility! Handle hundred-leggers with care.

Now millipedes, those are just adorable little leggy trains and wouldn't hurt a fly. Mostly because they're saprovores.

Cowslips Warren
Oct 29, 2005

What use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy's warren and paying his price?



Grimey Drawer

gently caress, winter is over, but during the night it's still cold. My balls range between scouring their cages looking for food, and then have no appetite when I offer them mice. They have always refused rats.

It gets to the point I don't even want to drag them out to drop in their feed boxes.

Goons Are Great
Jan 1, 1970

Well yeah, but honestly..



Cardiovorax posted:

I believe all centipedes are venomous, so that's something to be aware of as a matter of general principle. Even if they're not really dangerous to an animal the size of a human normally, anaphylactic shock is always a possibility! Handle hundred-leggers with care.

Now millipedes, those are just adorable little leggy trains and wouldn't hurt a fly. Mostly because they're saprovores.

Absolutely, yeah. I'm handling various venomous animals and this centipede in particular (scolopendra dehaani) has reported some casualties in the past, too, but mostly it's just insanely painful for a good while to be hit. Just like with pretty much all invertebrates though, they're mostly afraid of big rear end primates shaking up their world and don't want to fight at all, so it's best for all parties to always respect them to minimize both risk and fear.

Now, millipedes are cute and tiny little living busses and I love them dearly. Something to consider to get for anyone having a moist setup of any kind, they're lovely. As long as the main inhabitant doesn't eat them straight away, that is.

Hakarne
Jul 23, 2007
Vivo en el autobús!


Speaking of centipedes....

About a year ago my wife was doing laundry and screamed worse than I ever heard. She had just pulled the laundry out of the washing machine and something crawled across her hand. We found it and I caught it:



That's a desert centipede, right? I guess we were insanely lucky because the bite is supposed to be extraordinarily painful.

The REAL horrifying part was thinking of how it got in with our laundry because that didn't seem like something you'd normally find around the house. I'd had some bags of mulch sitting outside for a while and was lifting them with my shirt off - the only thing I had on were the shorts that were in that load of laundry. We figured it must have crawled into one of my pockets when I was spreading mulch. I feel insanely lucky I didn't get bit in a very unpleasant way

Goons Are Great
Jan 1, 1970

Well yeah, but honestly..



Oh yes, that is almost certainly (depending on where you live) a beautiful Scolopendra polymorpha, assuming he had around 14 to 18cm in length. Those are living exclusively in the southwestern US and Northern Mexico in the deserts, most commonly found in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Their bite is insanely painful with pain that can last for days, even when treated. Major complications can include severe infections, elderly and kids can even die from them.

They love to wander around all day long and can travel through vast areas in their life, they are fast and aggressive and like to hide under stones, wood and other shady spots during the day. They are excellent and extremely efficient burrowers, too. So yeah, you probably brought it in by accident that way.

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





fuzzy_logic posted:

Ok, that makes sense - I wasn't sure if it was something where they like being a little smooshed in and freak out with too much space. So many people seem to keep them in these cramped little boxes. For the acrylic enclosures the extra size isn't even much more expensive.

Ok Comboomer posted:

that’s usually more because people want to have more spiders than anything else

At one time at least there was also a lot of talk about fall danger (either the fall itself or a leg getting caught and popping off) for adult tarantulas which I think informed a lot of cramped enclosures. With slings I think it's fairly legit that their ability to find prey you offer + moisture concerns make a small container sensible?


Goons i got the fuckin itch again. Where do cool kids get their tarantulas these days, I haven't bought one in a decade or better.

Hakarne
Jul 23, 2007
Vivo en el autobús!


Goons Are Great posted:

Oh yes, that is almost certainly (depending on where you live) a beautiful Scolopendra polymorpha, assuming he had around 14 to 18cm in length. Those are living exclusively in the southwestern US and Northern Mexico in the deserts, most commonly found in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Their bite is insanely painful with pain that can last for days, even when treated. Major complications can include severe infections, elderly and kids can even die from them.

They love to wander around all day long and can travel through vast areas in their life, they are fast and aggressive and like to hide under stones, wood and other shady spots during the day. They are excellent and extremely efficient burrowers, too. So yeah, you probably brought it in by accident that way.

Yeah we're in Southern California. We were 95% sure but having it confirmed is pretty terrifying. I thought I was taking good precautions by wearing gloves, I wasn't expecting a centipede to crawl in my pocket.

Oh and of course we gently let him go outside after we captured him. He was really cool looking and he probably just wanted to get out of our house as much as we wanted him gone. He also didn't bite either of us despite having multiple chances after his mulch home was torn apart and he was put through a washing machine; we thought that was pretty nice of him. He now roams the wilds behind our house.

Edit:

Ok Comboomer posted:

he appears to be missing his back end in that photo, did you ever find it?

Hakarne fucked around with this message at 18:11 on Mar 9, 2021

Goons Are Great
Jan 1, 1970

Well yeah, but honestly..



He probably would have gone right through any non-piercing-proved gloves, too! So it's really good to be extra careful. Among venomous invertebrates, centipedes are of the most quarrelsome and aggressive, they produce large quantities of venom and thus don't have to treat it like a limited resource the way spiders have to. Still, in 95% of the cases they hate humans and mammals in general (except mice and rats, they hunt those) and just want to be left alone and have no interest in fighting with any mammal of human size. So you reacted entirely correct there!

It's best to either make a way so they can leave on their own, or catch them and immediately throw them out. Never touch them with your hands, even with gloves
Hands have a perfect size for them to bite into and they are incredibly strong. Their bite can come with a similar force like the sting of a large scorpion, sometimes they even pierce shoes.

I'm glad he's enjoying the wild now, though, polymorpha need a lot of space and are wanderers for life, I considered getting one myself before switching to my current one, after I figured that no matter the enclosure I have, I can never offer him the freedom of roaming in a desert. Which is good, because my centipede is a lazy dick head that can hardly be bothered to leave his cave more than once a week.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



the yeti posted:

At one time at least there was also a lot of talk about fall danger (either the fall itself or a leg getting caught and popping off) for adult tarantulas which I think informed a lot of cramped enclosures. With slings I think it's fairly legit that their ability to find prey you offer + moisture concerns make a small container sensible?


Goons i got the fuckin itch again. Where do cool kids get their tarantulas these days, I haven't bought one in a decade or better.

somebody get a GBB. It’s really the only big spider I want but I got too many lifeforms to take care of (and eventually move with 😬) right now to be like “yes, it is spider time”

Hakarne posted:

Yeah we're in Southern California. We were 95% sure but having it confirmed is pretty terrifying. I thought I was taking good precautions by wearing gloves, I wasn't expecting a centipede to crawl in my pocket.

Oh and of course we gently let him go outside after we captured him. He was really cool looking and he probably just wanted to get out of our house as much as we wanted him gone. He also didn't bite either of us despite having multiple chances after his mulch home was torn apart and he was put through a washing machine; we thought that was pretty nice of him. He now roams the wilds behind our house.

he appears to be missing his back end in that photo, did you ever find it?

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Ok Comboomer posted:

somebody get a GBB. It’s really the only big spider I want but I got too many lifeforms to take care of (and eventually move with 😬) right now to be like “yes, it is spider time”

GBBs, Acanthoscurria genic. and Brachypelma sp. are high on the potential list

Bollock Monkey
Jan 21, 2007

The Almighty


Reading this page has made me feel itchy and also glad to live in England.

Thanks for taking care of our arthropod friends for those of us who hyperventilate and run away!

Here is a picture of Max in his temp tank from when I moved house:

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Goons Are Great posted:

He probably would have gone right through any non-piercing-proved gloves, too! So it's really good to be extra careful.
That's pretty much guaranteed, yes! Scolopendra has less fangs and more "giant-rear end poison daggers."

Those things go through solid leather, kinda like Sydney Funnel Webs.

Lord Zedd-Repulsa
Jul 21, 2007

Devour a good book.



I've had a GBB for a bit over three years! Still dunno if they're a guy or girl yet but it only matters if they molt into being mature and looking for love.

No pic right now because I haven't been able to figure out what sort of things to add as stuff for web to stick to in their enclosure. If anyone has Amazon links for small quantities of actual sphagnum moss or other helpful material, please let me know. This is my first (and only, because of pet limits at my apartment) tarantula.

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Tahirovic
Feb 25, 2009


Fun Shoe

I used to have a ball python as a teen and owned a g. rosea for a couple years so I don't really have much experience with herps.
How difficult would it be to keep a sand boa with that background? I am interested in getting a snake and my gf really likes them, so she would be cool with having it in our apartment.

She also liked the pics of ball python morphs I showed her, but I am hestitant on those due to price and health issues. Not to mention mine was a picky eater and I am kinda done with that, especially with our new laws that prophibit live mice.

Sand boa's seem like a good option here, the care sheets seem simple enough and there are plenty of breeders in Switzerland/Germany.
How bad of an idea are they for a newbie?

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