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SubponticatePoster
Aug 9, 2004

Every day takes figurin' out all over again how to fuckin' live.


Slippery Tilde

Steve Yun posted:



I am going to Paris from October 23-29. Any recommended things to hit up? Any tourist advice? Anything I can do to cause an international incident?

Do I need to make arrangements far in advance to see the following:
- The Arc Of Triumph
- The Louver Museum
- The Museum De Orsay
- The Paris Tower

Any restaurants in Paris to hit up?
By "Paris Tower" I'm assuming the Eiffel Tower? You don't need to make arrangements for any of those things but I've been to Paris 4 times (I was there just in September) and can give you some advice.

Get a Museum Pass from the official tourism office. There's one at Hotel De Ville, and that's close to a few attractions (Notre Dame, Louvre, D'Orsay). You can get them for multiple days. These things are great because you get to jump the sometimes-horrific lines. They're good at something like 50 museums in the Paris area so if you go to some of the smaller ones like Carnavalet and Picasso you can do 2 in a day. It's also good at the Arc. Now if you just want to go stand in front of the Arc and take pictures it's free, but you can go to the top and see a small museum and a great view of the city. Just keep in mind that unless you are handicapped you have to take the stairs and it's not a climb for the out-of-shape.

You can also buy what's called the PassLib' from the tourism office which includes a museum pass, a transit pass, a ticket for a river cruise and a bus tour. This isn't a bad deal as the price of everything separate would be more. For 20 euro more you can schedule a visit to the Eiffel Tower. I did this once and while I still had to stand in line awhile it wasn't the usual 2+ hour shitshow. It used to be much easier but now everyone has to go through security which slows things down. However you just show up a few minutes before your scheduled time with your pass in hand and you get to cut in the line.

It's hard to recommend just one restaurant as there are about a million of them, but for the most part you're not gonna go wrong just plopping down at any place that grabs your fancy. For something more in depth you'll want to specify how much you're willing to spend, the type of food, etc. It's fuckin' Paris man, they have Michelin starred restaurants like the USA has convenience stores. Also if you don't speak French nobody GAF, just know hello, please, thank you, etc. In spite of the reputation I've never had a single Parisian be rude to me.

Also don't take cabs unless you're out late at night, the Metro/bus will get you anywhere you need to go and it's not hard to figure out. You'll be there for a short enough time that a Visite will probably do you fine, it's a little more than a Navigo but then you don't have to deal with getting the card and all that poo poo. If you're landing at DeGaulle you can take the RER 2 into the city for about $12 and then take a Metro to wherever you're staying. A cab will run you 5x that at least.

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Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Yeah, I was just misspelling all of the landmarks to sound like a clueless tourist

Thanks for the great recommendations, everyone!

Nephzinho
Jan 24, 2008



SubponticatePoster posted:

A cab will run you 5x that at least.

Note that if you try to use Uber you're going to be playing games with actually getting/finding your car. They will drop you off around the corner from your destination and pretty much drive by you before stopping to pick you up. I vaguely recall a friend talking about cabbies calling and vandalizing Ubers and them being very careful about pickup and drop off spots as a result.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Steve Yun posted:

Yeah, I was just misspelling all of the landmarks to sound like a clueless tourist

Thanks for the great recommendations, everyone!

https://youtu.be/mJG0lqukJTQ

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Need some quick recs for Singapore

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

AnonSpore posted:

Need some quick recs for Singapore

How long are you there? Multiply that number by 3 and that's how many times you go for Hainanese Chicken Rice.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat


I love American accents in other languages, never fails to crack me up

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=it52DtmIcec#t=21s

Steve Yun fucked around with this message at Oct 10, 2018 around 20:10

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Mr. Wiggles posted:

How long are you there? Multiply that number by 3 and that's how many times you go for Hainanese Chicken Rice.

Only a weekend, but yeah that was my plan except a break to try chili crab and durian

Ginger Beer Belly
Aug 18, 2010



AnonSpore posted:

Only a weekend, but yeah that was my plan except a break to try chili crab and durian

For Chili Crab, try No Signboard on Geylang Rd.

Slowpoke!
Feb 12, 2008

ANIME IS FOR ADULTS


Steve Yun posted:

Yeah, I was just misspelling all of the landmarks to sound like a clueless tourist

Thanks for the great recommendations, everyone!

You probably don't live in a city that has Michelin star restaurants. Go eat at one. Just look for a recent list of the most affordable 1 star Michelin restaurants and eat whatever course menu they are serving. They are all good if they have a Michelin star, and there is no reason to drop several hundred dollars at a 3 star unless you can afford it.

I would recommend finding one that is near a museum and eating there for lunch after a morning visit. Just get there (the museum) earlier than you expect because even with a pass, you still will have to stand in a very long line to get in.

AnonSpore posted:

Need some quick recs for Singapore

Seconding chili crab with a bunch of those fried bread rolls. I don't know where we ate when we visited because a friend took us to a local place, but it was fantastic.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Slowpoke! posted:

You probably don't live in a city that has Michelin star restaurants. Go eat at one. Just look for a recent list of the most affordable 1 star Michelin restaurants and eat whatever course menu they are serving.

lol I know you meant this as in a "you prob don't live in a huge metro area" kind of way, but Steve is in LA and you are still right. LA does not have any Michelin starred places.

wyoak
Feb 14, 2005

a glass case of emotion


Fallen Rib

Casu Marzu posted:

lol I know you meant this as in a "you prob don't live in a huge metro area" kind of way, but Steve is in LA and you are still right. LA does not have any Michelin starred places.
Michelin only reviews in NYC, San Fran, and Chicago, no?

edit: In the US, I mean

wyoak fucked around with this message at Oct 15, 2018 around 19:49

Keret
Aug 26, 2012


Hey friends, I'm going to be travelling to Japan and Hong Kong in December. I love trying whatever new food I can when I travel, but the catch is, I'm vegetarian. Anyone have good authentic but veg-friendly food suggestions for Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, and/or Hong Kong? Dope veg ramen is something I'm especially looking for. I've made my peace with dashi/bonito being in a ton of stuff in Japan, so I'm willing to compromise on that.

Good tea houses, espresso/coffee bars, and sake breweries are also much appreciated.

I'm willing to splurge on really good food, but I'm also not made of money so reasonable prices are a plus unless it's somewhere I really can't miss.

Argue
Sep 29, 2005

I represent the Philippines

There's a well known tofu restaurant in Kyoto, Tosuiro; I'm not sure if they serve individual dishes--what we had there was degustation style, and every dish we got incorporated tofu in some way. Not every dish was vegetarian-friendly, but I think you can email and ask.

I'm bad at appreciating coffee, but my brother is a huge coffee snob and dragged us all around Tokyo for coffee, so I can name a few places to go which he attests to. There's Cafe de L'ambre in Ginza, which he likes going to whenever we're in the area, and then there's Bear Pond Espresso in Kitagawa. The latter is famous for its Angel Stain, which the guy only serves 20 cups a day of, and only until 2pm--whichever comes first. It's just a tiny shot of espresso and it's supposedly one of the best in the world, but they all taste the same to me. Another popular one, Omotesando Koffee, closed, but they opened a new one in the same area, called Koffee Mameya. That one is primarily a place to purchase a bunch of obscure beans, if you're that kind of person, but they also serve coffee--literally, just "coffee". And "espresso", I think. No customization or whatever.

biggfoo
Sep 12, 2005

My god, it's full of !

Argue posted:


I'm bad at appreciating coffee, but my brother is a huge coffee snob and dragged us all around Tokyo for coffee, so I can name a few places to go which he attests to. There's Cafe de L'ambre in Ginza, which he likes going to whenever we're in the area, and then there's Bear Pond Espresso in Kitagawa. The latter is famous for its Angel Stain, which the guy only serves 20 cups a day of, and only until 2pm--whichever comes first. It's just a tiny shot of espresso and it's supposedly one of the best in the world, but they all taste the same to me. Another popular one, Omotesando Koffee, closed, but they opened a new one in the same area, called Koffee Mameya. That one is primarily a place to purchase a bunch of obscure beans, if you're that kind of person, but they also serve coffee--literally, just "coffee". And "espresso", I think. No customization or whatever.

Not your brother but he sounds like me. Bear Pond is probably one of my favorite coffees ever and enjoyed just wandering around the neighborhood where it was. Have been a couple times with years between and consistently great.

Some of the other coffee places I dragged people that stood out the most in memory:

These 3 are all your kind of typical 3rd wave coffee house place/preparations:
Little nap.
Be a good neighbor.
Nozy Coffee

More traditional kissaten:
Cafe Del L'Ambre
Tsuta Coffee
Diabo which looks like the man retired and closed .

Feisty-Cadaver
Jun 1, 2000
The worms crawl in,
The worms crawl out.

Cybernetic Crumb

Keret posted:

Hey friends, I'm going to be travelling to Japan and Hong Kong in December. I love trying whatever new food I can when I travel, but the catch is, I'm vegetarian. Anyone have good authentic but veg-friendly food suggestions for Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, and/or Hong Kong? Dope veg ramen is something I'm especially looking for. I've made my peace with dashi/bonito being in a ton of stuff in Japan, so I'm willing to compromise on that.

Good tea houses, espresso/coffee bars, and sake breweries are also much appreciated.

I'm willing to splurge on really good food, but I'm also not made of money so reasonable prices are a plus unless it's somewhere I really can't miss.

for HK:
Knockbox coffee in Yau Ma Tei is great, but kinda out of the way. Kuberick is worth a visit if you're in the area. Otherwise I like Coco Espresso and Coffee Academics; both have a couple locations.

Don't have any good specifically vegetarian recommendations though. Just grab the openrice app and pick something that's well-reviewed and close-by when you get hungry

Bagheera
Oct 30, 2003


Effort post on Key West.

Local Secrets. Great food that's not in tourist brochures.
Better Than Sex. A restaurant that only serves drinks and desserts. It's the best desserts I've ever had, with a great romantic atmosphere. My favorite restaurant in Key West.
Glazed Donuts. The best donuts I've ever had. They make everything from scratch. The dough, the toppings, the syrup, everything is hand-made where you can see it. They change their menu every month based on what's in season.
El Siboney. Best Cuban food in the Keys. Some of the best Cuban food in Florida. Some places in Miami (not many) are better, and nothing outside of south Florida is close.
Jose's Latin Food. Best Mexican tacos in the Keys. As good as any I've had in Mexico. Also good Central American food as well (run by a Nicaraguan family).
Corner Sandwich Shop. A hole in the wall that serves the best Cuban sandwiches in the Keys. The secret is the shredded mojo pork: Cooked in a pressure cooker with mojo sauce, then shredded, then sauteed in more mojo sauce. The edges are lightly crisped while the interior is smooth.
Smoked BBQ. A floating BBQ restaurant that opened this year. Good smoked pork, chicken, and brisket.
Roostica. A great pizza restaurant on Stock Island (one island over from Key West). Great Neopolitan style pizza.
Yahman. A Jamaican guy with a smoker in his front yard. Jerk chicken, curry goat, and other specialties as good as any I've had in the Caribbean.

High-End Dining. Expensive restaurants that aren't ripoffs.
Latitudes. On a small island just off Key West, you take a water taxi to get there. You can eat inside or watch the sunset from a table on the sand. Top-notch food in a top-notch setting.
Prime. Best steakhouse in Key West. Expensive, but totally worth it.
Conch Republic Seafood Company. Best seafood in Key West. Go in the evening after the boats come in. The fish on your plate that night was probably cuaght that morning.
Santiago's Bodega. It's a tapas restaurant, but not just Spanish cuisine. Every month or so, their menu rotates in new appetizer-sized food, all of it top-notch.

Overrated Tourist Traps. Expensive restaurants that are ripoffs.
Goldman's Deli. Has the steretypical rude service of a Jewish deli, but not the tasty food. If you like bland, day-old chicken salad and dry pastrami, served by a waitress who took half an hour to get you a glass of water, then I guess this is the place for you.
Charlie Macs. When they first opened, they served amazing BBQ. They even named their smokemaster and head chef on the menu. In the past year or so, though, they started serving bland, dry BBQ. They're in a great location and get lots of tourists, so they don't need to serve quality food to make tons of money.
El Meson De Pepe. A Cuban restaurant right on Mallory Square. Bland Cuban food that's overpriced. Go to El Siboney instead.
Anything On Duval Street. WHen 5,000 tourists stream off a cruise ship and onto Duval, you don't need to make good food to get a fast buck. Most of the restaurants along the main drag are expensive and bland. Carolines, Margaritaville, and Fogartys are especially bad. Fun for people watching, bad for foodies.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Bagheera posted:

Effort post on Key West.

Local Secrets. Great food that's not in tourist brochures.
Better Than Sex. A restaurant that only serves drinks and desserts. It's the best desserts I've ever had, with a great romantic atmosphere. My favorite restaurant in Key West.
Glazed Donuts. The best donuts I've ever had. They make everything from scratch. The dough, the toppings, the syrup, everything is hand-made where you can see it. They change their menu every month based on what's in season.
El Siboney. Best Cuban food in the Keys. Some of the best Cuban food in Florida. Some places in Miami (not many) are better, and nothing outside of south Florida is close.
Jose's Latin Food. Best Mexican tacos in the Keys. As good as any I've had in Mexico. Also good Central American food as well (run by a Nicaraguan family).
Corner Sandwich Shop. A hole in the wall that serves the best Cuban sandwiches in the Keys. The secret is the shredded mojo pork: Cooked in a pressure cooker with mojo sauce, then shredded, then sauteed in more mojo sauce. The edges are lightly crisped while the interior is smooth.
Smoked BBQ. A floating BBQ restaurant that opened this year. Good smoked pork, chicken, and brisket.
Roostica. A great pizza restaurant on Stock Island (one island over from Key West). Great Neopolitan style pizza.
Yahman. A Jamaican guy with a smoker in his front yard. Jerk chicken, curry goat, and other specialties as good as any I've had in the Caribbean.

High-End Dining. Expensive restaurants that aren't ripoffs.
Latitudes. On a small island just off Key West, you take a water taxi to get there. You can eat inside or watch the sunset from a table on the sand. Top-notch food in a top-notch setting.
Prime. Best steakhouse in Key West. Expensive, but totally worth it.
Conch Republic Seafood Company. Best seafood in Key West. Go in the evening after the boats come in. The fish on your plate that night was probably cuaght that morning.
Santiago's Bodega. It's a tapas restaurant, but not just Spanish cuisine. Every month or so, their menu rotates in new appetizer-sized food, all of it top-notch.

Overrated Tourist Traps. Expensive restaurants that are ripoffs.
Goldman's Deli. Has the steretypical rude service of a Jewish deli, but not the tasty food. If you like bland, day-old chicken salad and dry pastrami, served by a waitress who took half an hour to get you a glass of water, then I guess this is the place for you.
Charlie Macs. When they first opened, they served amazing BBQ. They even named their smokemaster and head chef on the menu. In the past year or so, though, they started serving bland, dry BBQ. They're in a great location and get lots of tourists, so they don't need to serve quality food to make tons of money.
El Meson De Pepe. A Cuban restaurant right on Mallory Square. Bland Cuban food that's overpriced. Go to El Siboney instead.
Anything On Duval Street. WHen 5,000 tourists stream off a cruise ship and onto Duval, you don't need to make good food to get a fast buck. Most of the restaurants along the main drag are expensive and bland. Carolines, Margaritaville, and Fogartys are especially bad. Fun for people watching, bad for foodies.

drat, I really want to visit Key West now.

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


Stringent posted:

drat, I really want to visit Key West now.

Better do it within the next couple of decades, it's not going to remain above water for long.

angor
Nov 14, 2003
teen angst

Amergin posted:

I got a whole list of places to go check out so if you want more, let me know.

Around the Cambria:
Barcadia is a fun place to chill if you're a nerd
Peche Seafood Grill
Mother's
Mulate's


Little bit more outside that area:
Buttermilk Drop & La Boulangerie for bakeries
Dooky Chase, Mandina's, Felix's Oyster Bar, Crabby Jack's, Salvo's Seafood, Mahoney's Po' Boy Shop are all good staples


If you get tired of creole/seafood:
Dong Phuong Oriental Bakery
SukhoThai
Humble Bagel
Pizza Domenica
Blue Dot Donuts
The Company Burger
Dat Dog


For more bar/music type deals:
Vaughan's Lounge
Spotted Cat Music Club
Preservation Hall
Carousel Bar
Twelve Mile Limit
Cure
The Other Bar
Snake & Jake's

And I always stop into Siberia Lounge to have my ear drums burst while munching on delicious pierogies and sausages.

Last night of my trip! Most of my meals have been at the conference I've been at which have varied from just alright to actually pretty decent. Mother's was awesome, had a kickass slice at Crescent City Pizza Works, but the absolute best meal I've had in my time here was lunch at Cochon today. Unbelievably good. Might check out Dat Dog if I can convince myself to leave the hotel tonight. Thanks again for the recs!

therobit
Aug 19, 2008

Cat Army


On Saturday I am driving up to Seattle from Portland to take my wife on a date. We're going to a play at 8:00 in the evening but I'm looking for a dinner recommendation under $150 and also a good lunch recommendation.

Dinner does not have to be super fancy but it does have to be good. The play is at the Moore Theater downtown. Lunch could also be somewhere between Portland and Seattle if there is somewhere good on the way. Our hotel is in downtown Bellevue so we could eat near the also.

Any ideas?

Picayune
Feb 26, 2007

Dog-Disciple Of
Shadow And Flame


Wedge Regret

In that situation, I'd personally go for The Brooklyn - I like it a lot and it's just a few blocks over on 2nd, so you could park for the Moore and walk down to dinner with no issues.

There's also the Metropolitan Grill, a few blocks further on, but it sounds like it's more than you were looking to spend. It's a really good steakhouse, though, if that's your thing.

They're both on the stodgy-but-friendly upscale end. Reservations good.

Kalenden
Oct 30, 2012


Hi, so looking for some good eat/drink spots as solo-business-traveler in Harlem, New York City.

In your opinion, what are are the best (healthy-innovative-exciting-local-authentic-unique to harlem-...) eating and drink spots in Harlem?

I'm staying at Arloft Harlem and will be eating solo as I am on a business trip. Looking for good breakfast, lunch, dinner options and coffee. Extra points if its health-orientated, unique to harlem, or innovative, exciting, creative, and also pleasant to eat at alone ...
I'll also often be close to Columbia University.

For breakfast, a good breakfast for me is somewhere close, where I can sit down, and preferably open before 8AM.

For Dinner, I was thinking of perhaps doing a Soul-food type place, since that seems most "Harlem-Like", and an exotic place for the other, but I'm open for suggestions.

Big Bad Voodoo Lou
Jan 1, 2006


Never been to it, but Red Rooster in Harlem is supposed to be great.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Need some recs for Washington, D.C. Not too expensive, groups of around 4+, looking for a good time more than fine dining.

CleverHans
Apr 25, 2011



AnonSpore posted:

Need some recs for Washington, D.C. Not too expensive, groups of around 4+, looking for a good time more than fine dining.

https://www.ambarrestaurant.com/home-page-washington/

$49 per person, all you can eat and drink if you can get everybody on board - food is great and the house drinks / wines are solid.

Kalenden
Oct 30, 2012


Looking for recommendations for Lisbon.

For foodies who love to explore both exotic, innovative and classic kitchens, with budget being no issue if worth it ( Michelin is an option for example).
It is for a 3-5 day city trip so a couple of non portuguese options are welcome as well.
So long as it allows for a gastronomic experience, enjoying a, at least, multi-hour (1.5+) meal after a walking city trip, and is unique/innovative/exceptional/exotic as compared to the regular Belgian/French cuisine.

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Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Thanks for the Paris recommendations everyone. I landed at 6AM and my hotel wouldn't check me in until 3PM so I somehow managed to figure out the transit system, visit Versailles, Notre Dame, the Hotel de Ville and the Eiffel Tower in the first delirious adrenaline-fueled day. I hit so many landmarks I started running out of things to do by day 4 so I ended up visiting Jim Morrison's grave and eating a Royal with Cheese for yucks



Best meals:

Le Coq Rico for rotisserie chicken


Ambassade d'Auvergne for lamb shank and aligot


The Louvre Museum's restaurant was surprisingly good (and finally had the first escargot of my life that wasn't terrible)

Steve Yun fucked around with this message at Nov 14, 2018 around 21:50

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