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Steve French
Sep 7, 2003



Charles posted:

There are some cars that use wireless sensors. What kind of car is it though, please.

Sorry, obvious useful info. 2008 RS4

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simplefish
Mar 28, 2011

So long, and thanks for all the fish gallbladdΣrs!



Zero VGS posted:

Bought an electric car. One day a couple years ago it decided not to charge when plugged into any charger.

Brought it to the dealer and they're like: "yeah that's weird, it's not charging on ours either. OK, we did a systems reset with our specialized computer and now it charges, we'll let you know when we figure out why it happened in the first place."

Few years go by, they never find a cause, and my car does it again. Bring it back to dealer "Sorry, it's out of warranty now, it'll be $200 to look at it."

That doesn't sound fair if they never solved the issue in the first place back when it was in warranty? I guess I'm in a bold new "internet of poo poo" future where my car will brick itself unless I have a proprietary tool to turn it off and back on again? Can I press the issue with them? I have it on paper that they were supposed to find a cause/fix for the issue and never did, so in my opinion my warranty "ticket" was never really closed. Would Small Claims court do the trick if they're stubborn?

If it's less than $200 to get a lawyer to write a letter you could try that first, but yeah you might be poo poo out of luck unless it's something that affects the whole model range. Especially since you drove it for years after it left their hands, I think you'd be hard pressed to argue they didn't fix it when you've been driving it for however many miles and that much time without complaint.

I'm not in the US though so your chances of a court-based solution might be different

DrBouvenstein
Feb 28, 2007

I think I'm a doctor, but that doesn't make me a doctor. This fancy avatar does.


For the past month or so, my car (2008 Mazda 3) has been making a clicking noise from the passenger side ONLY when I brake. Pretty sure front, but hard to tell, it's not a loud sound, but I also know the front has more "stuff" than the rear, what with the steering and power linkages and whatnot.



It's hard to hear, headphones might help, but towards the end it's a clicking sound that, as far as I can tell, it synced to the wheel rotation. One rotation is one click, so it starts clicking fast, a few times per second, then slows down as the car slows down. I looked at the rotor, I don't see anything physically about it that would cause it to click from, say, rubbing against the brake pads.

The pads themselves also look fine to me, though I'm no expert.

At first I thought tie rod, but it's ONLY when I brake, not turn. Again, not a car expert, but in the past every timer i've had an issue with a tie rod I hear a similar clicking when I turn the wheel. I also don't notice any weird sounds when I go over a bump or something, so i don't think it's related to the suspension.

https://www.autoblog.com/2009/10/06...-while-driving/

Seems that maybe the pad and/or caliper could potentially be loose? I have disc brakes in the rear, so this could be why sometimes I think it's coming from the rear, especially since I recently removed my front passenger wheel for a different issue, and while I was there checked the brakes and nothing looked off, but I haven't checked the rear.

Toebone
Jul 1, 2002

Start remembering what you hear.

2016 Honda HR-V, 115k miles. Died on me when pulling into the grocery store parking lot yesterday, mechanic looked at it this morning and said the transmission is shot. Quoted me about $2500 for parts and labor to install a 2019 transmission with 5k miles.

115k miles seems early for a transmission to die to me, but I trust him. Does that cost sound reasonable?

Edit: I should mention it's been making a grinding/buzzing sound when accelerating the past couple days, but only sometimes. I always kept up on the maintenance schedule, but who knows about the previous owner.

Toebone fucked around with this message at 18:11 on May 27, 2020

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


Toebone posted:

2016 Honda HR-V, 115k miles. Died on me when pulling into the grocery store parking lot yesterday, mechanic looked at it this morning and said the transmission is shot. Quoted me about $2500 for parts and labor to install a 2019 transmission with 5k miles.

115k miles seems early for a transmission to die to me, but I trust him. Does that cost sound reasonable?

2500 parts and labor doesn't strike me as unreasonable at all, but I would want to know how he came to the conclusion the transmissions is shot. A Honda transmission, with what I'm assuming is mostly highway miles on it dying at 115K seems odd. Not saying it's not possible, just odd.

rdb
Jul 8, 2002
chicken mctesticles?

skipdogg posted:

2500 parts and labor doesn't strike me as unreasonable at all, but I would want to know how he came to the conclusion the transmissions is shot. A Honda transmission, with what I'm assuming is mostly highway miles on it dying at 115K seems odd. Not saying it's not possible, just odd.

Honda CVTs are crap. Its not outside the realm of possibility.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Steve French posted:

Sorry, obvious useful info. 2008 RS4

Yeah, that uses a wireless TPMS sensor. There's some sort of pairing process to be sure, otherwise it'd be a mess every time you pulled up to a stoplight. It's theoretically possible that both sets of TPMS sensors are somehow always active in the car but more likely you should be doing a re-pair every time you swap wheels.


skipdogg posted:

2500 parts and labor doesn't strike me as unreasonable at all, but I would want to know how he came to the conclusion the transmissions is shot. A Honda transmission, with what I'm assuming is mostly highway miles on it dying at 115K seems odd. Not saying it's not possible, just odd.

I'd personally want a second opinion or at least some more detailed answers on how that conclusion was reached, but $2500 seems fair for a super low-mileage transmission with labor.

Zero VGS posted:

Bought an electric car. One day a couple years ago it decided not to charge when plugged into any charger.

Brought it to the dealer and they're like: "yeah that's weird, it's not charging on ours either. OK, we did a systems reset with our specialized computer and now it charges, we'll let you know when we figure out why it happened in the first place."

Few years go by, they never find a cause, and my car does it again. Bring it back to dealer "Sorry, it's out of warranty now, it'll be $200 to look at it."

That doesn't sound fair if they never solved the issue in the first place back when it was in warranty? I guess I'm in a bold new "internet of poo poo" future where my car will brick itself unless I have a proprietary tool to turn it off and back on again? Can I press the issue with them? I have it on paper that they were supposed to find a cause/fix for the issue and never did, so in my opinion my warranty "ticket" was never really closed. Would Small Claims court do the trick if they're stubborn?

You'll want to escalate that with the manufacturer before you jump to small claims. I'm not even remotely a lawyer but I don't think small claims can order a business to do a thing. I'm pretty sure they're just for recovering damaged incurred, which if you haven't paid $200 to have them look at it, you haven't experienced yet.

ChocNitty
Aug 3, 2011


Are there any real deals to be had at police repo car auctions? Or are there too many people there looking to buy a car for themselves who pay fair market value?

DreadCthulhu
Sep 17, 2008

What the fuck is up, Denny's?!


It's the end of the month and it's apparently a super slow car buying season due to COVID. How do I make this work for me as someone in the market for a new vehicle?

Say MSRP is 29k, and the current discount listed on the site brings it to 27k. Can I get them to go down all the way to say 24k or more due to the market conditions? How do I make that happen?

two_beer_bishes
Jun 27, 2004


DreadCthulhu posted:

It's the end of the month and it's apparently a super slow car buying season due to COVID. How do I make this work for me as someone in the market for a new vehicle?

Say MSRP is 29k, and the current discount listed on the site brings it to 27k. Can I get them to go down all the way to say 24k or more due to the market conditions? How do I make that happen?

I forget where I read it, but deals like that are going to be tough to get right now because dealers don't have the volume in sales to make up for the loss in revenue.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


They sometimes will give you a deal to meet breakpoints for sales goals but I'm pretty sure nobody is anywhere close to those goals..

Minto Took
Dec 4, 2002



Fun Shoe

They'll grovel as you walk through the door, but I wouldn't expect much haggle room.

Arishtat
Jan 2, 2011



Steve French posted:

I have no idea how TPMS works, and have never had a car with TPMS and multiple sets of wheels. Is there any possibility of interference? I got a car used with winter tires and wheels on it in January and it started throwing TPMS warnings this winter every once in a while; I just swapped the wheels over last weekend and driving it everything seemed to be fine until the moment I pulled into the garage, when I got a warning again. The extra set of wheels is naturally in the garage right next to where the car is parked. Is there any possibility of this being an issue, or is something else likely going on?

The answer is it heavily depends on the year, make, model and sometimes trim level of the vehicle. Some cars can manage multiple sets of tires, most don't.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

I've been shopping TPMS sensors and most claim to stay turned off until moved. Did you happen to move the tires around for some reason before the problem happened? I suppose some might come on occasionally for some reason, but that seems like a bad design decision.

Steve French
Sep 7, 2003



taqueso posted:

I've been shopping TPMS sensors and most claim to stay turned off until moved. Did you happen to move the tires around for some reason before the problem happened? I suppose some might come on occasionally for some reason, but that seems like a bad design decision.

I bought the car with both sets of wheels/tires from the PO. When I went to the bay area to pick it up, I asked him to put the winters on because there was snow in the forecast for the drive home to the mountains. He did, we threw the summers into the truck and they sat in our garage right next to the car for the winter until I swapped them this past weekend. Have had the TPMS warning intermittently with both the summers and winters. I did no pairing or any electronic anything whatsoever when I swapped them, or at any point previous, just physically changing the wheels.

Tai-Pan
Feb 9, 2001


StormDrain posted:

So this comment is a big wtf for me, what do you mean? Is there an unmetered hole in your intake somewhere because yes that is a problem. And one you could cover and see an instant change.

Also earlier you said the butterflies "seem closed when not running" is there a way to see them while it is running? Like air cleaner off and maybe a mirror or something I'd the access is weird?

There is a vacuum hose that runs to the crankcase in the middle of the balance tube. So not exactly "unmetered" but most people just eliminate that use a little K&N filter thingy instead.
Yes, I have tested with crankcase hose in place, without it and completely taped shut. It had no impact.


SU carbs make it really hard to "see" anything in there. I have to presume the butterfly are opening because it wouldn't possibly get enough air or fuel with them sealed.

Partial Octopus
Feb 4, 2006





I've decided that I want to purchase a used 4 cyclinder Rav4 AWD. Are there any years I should avoid? Also are there any major issues I should look out for when shopping for one?

Whiirrr
Feb 13, 2006



Soiled Meat

Been trying to learn how to fix up a 1987 Toyota Pickup that's been sitting for awhile. I've only done some basic car maintenance things on my own, like oil, spark plugs, and that sorta thing. The problem is that the clutch pedal has around 2-3 inches of play before it starts to engage the clutch. Been trying to adjust the clutch pedal, but there's a nut that I can't loosen. I'm not sure if I'm doing something wrong or not. I've sprayed a ton of WD-40 on it and cleaned it, but I just can't turn it.

The problem nut:


Any tips on how to get the thing to move without stripping it?

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

FreeAll or AeroKroil work a lot better (AeroKroil is also super expensive at least on amazon, so don't buy that there). Are you putting a wrench on that square bracket while you try to loosen the nut?

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

Partial Octopus posted:

I've decided that I want to purchase a used 4 cyclinder Rav4 AWD. Are there any years I should avoid? Also are there any major issues I should look out for when shopping for one?
Decent starting point: http://www.toyotaproblems.com/models/rav4/

Whiirrr posted:

Been trying to learn how to fix up a 1987 Toyota Pickup that's been sitting for awhile. I've only done some basic car maintenance things on my own, like oil, spark plugs, and that sorta thing. The problem is that the clutch pedal has around 2-3 inches of play before it starts to engage the clutch. Been trying to adjust the clutch pedal, but there's a nut that I can't loosen. I'm not sure if I'm doing something wrong or not. I've sprayed a ton of WD-40 on it and cleaned it, but I just can't turn it.

The problem nut:


Any tips on how to get the thing to move without stripping it?
FreeAll or AeroKroil work a lot better (AeroKroil is also super expensive at least on amazon, so don't buy that there). Are you putting a wrench on that square bracket while you try to loosen the nut?

The Scientist
Nov 6, 2009



Soiled Meat

Would unscrewing the cap to the coolant reservoir on an overheated engine cause it to start gushing coolant out?

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


The Scientist posted:

Would unscrewing the cap to the coolant reservoir on an overheated engine cause it to start gushing coolant out?

Yes, and you'd probably scald yourself if you did so.

This is assuming that the reason it overheated wasn't because it had no coolant by the way.

Whiirrr
Feb 13, 2006



Soiled Meat

Krakkles posted:

FreeAll or AeroKroil work a lot better (AeroKroil is also super expensive at least on amazon, so don't buy that there). Are you putting a wrench on that square bracket while you try to loosen the nut?

I have used a wrench on the square bracket. It seemed to turn slightly, but I couldn't loosen the other nut. I'll order some of the loosing spray and hope that helps. Thanks!

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008








Slippery Tilde

If that doesn't work, apply heat.

The Scientist
Nov 6, 2009



Soiled Meat

kid sinister posted:

Yes, and you'd probably scald yourself if you did so.

This is assuming that the reason it overheated wasn't because it had no coolant by the way.

What's confusing about this to me is that it seems like most reservoirs aren't under pressure, since most of them have an overflow tube that dumps out any excess coolant once the reservoir gets too full. There's like no valve or anything

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Whiirrr posted:

I have used a wrench on the square bracket. It seemed to turn slightly, but I couldn't loosen the other nut. I'll order some of the loosing spray and hope that helps. Thanks!

Assuming we're talking about the jam nut on the clevis in the center, since it looks like it's already yielding a bit - I'd switch from a regular open ended wrench to a line wrench or a locking adjustable wrench. Line wrench would spread that leverage across more flats, locking adjustable would have a harder time slipping since it's also applying pressure to the nut.

I'd also hit those exposed threads with a brush, almost looks like there's some crud built up that's not going to make your life any easier.

The Scientist posted:

What's confusing about this to me is that it seems like most reservoirs aren't under pressure, since most of them have an overflow tube that dumps out any excess coolant once the reservoir gets too full. There's like no valve or anything

I wouldn't call it "most" but there are a lot of vehicles where the 'overflow tank' is part of the pressurized system and they usually don't have a separate radiator cap.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

The Scientist posted:

Would unscrewing the cap to the coolant reservoir on an overheated engine cause it to start gushing coolant out?

Absolutely do not do this, I learned the hard way 20 years ago and will never forget. Try as hard as you can to learn the easy way. A scalded face is not fun. It doesn't matter if there is gushing liquid or not, there will be superhot steam.

Action Man
Jan 31, 2007



2005 Toyota Camry LE 3.0L V6
262,000 miles
Comutes ~80 miles/day in eastern Kansas, mostly highway.

About two winters ago, I had a rear brake caliper seize up and destroy the pads on the passenger rear wheel. I had just replaced the pads not long ago, so I just changed out the back pads and got a new caliper. I went ahead and replaced the rear rotors since I assumed there was no way I hadn't badly damaged them by getting them red hot a couple times before I figured out what was going on.
Then last summer I did some suspension work, and replace the front rotors while I had it apart.
Fast forward to now. I'm getting vibration while braking, sometimes there's a high pitch squeal before the brake is fully engaged (pads aren't worn out so it's not the wear indicators making the noise).
My only guess is warped rotors, but it seems early for that to have happened and I don't perceive myself to do any weird braking. I considered getting the rotors resurfaced but the cost is similar to just replacing them. I feel like if I'm going to replace the rotors I should bit the bullet and replace the pads as well since the two interact so closely, if one is worn weird it makes sense that the pads might be out of spec too….
Before throwing like $250 in parts at it, is there something else I'm not thinking of? I can't think of what else could cause brake vibrations other than irregular pad/rotor wear? I mainly don't want to throw parts at it and mess up my new parts because I didn't actually fix the problem.
Please help, I need constant reassurance.

The Scientist
Nov 6, 2009



Soiled Meat

Action Man posted:

2005 Toyota Camry LE 3.0L V6
262,000 miles
Comutes ~80 miles/day in eastern Kansas, mostly highway.

About two winters ago, I had a rear brake caliper seize up and destroy the pads on the passenger rear wheel. I had just replaced the pads not long ago, so I just changed out the back pads and got a new caliper. I went ahead and replaced the rear rotors since I assumed there was no way I hadn't badly damaged them by getting them red hot a couple times before I figured out what was going on.
Then last summer I did some suspension work, and replace the front rotors while I had it apart.
Fast forward to now. I'm getting vibration while braking, sometimes there's a high pitch squeal before the brake is fully engaged (pads aren't worn out so it's not the wear indicators making the noise).
My only guess is warped rotors, but it seems early for that to have happened and I don't perceive myself to do any weird braking. I considered getting the rotors resurfaced but the cost is similar to just replacing them. I feel like if I'm going to replace the rotors I should bit the bullet and replace the pads as well since the two interact so closely, if one is worn weird it makes sense that the pads might be out of spec too….
Before throwing like $250 in parts at it, is there something else I'm not thinking of? I can't think of what else could cause brake vibrations other than irregular pad/rotor wear? I mainly don't want to throw parts at it and mess up my new parts because I didn't actually fix the problem.
Please help, I need constant reassurance.

Have you tried just setting the brakes in? Sometimes the rotors build up pad material on them, and you can get a nice clean surface again by accelerating to ~60 mph, and braking to 5 mph with successively harder braking, 6 times. On the 6th time, you should get right up to the point that ABS is engaging. Same thing you do when you put new pads on.

e: if there is some kind of otherwise unaccounted for metal on metal contact making the squeling, setting the brake pads in as above would be bad obviously.

Also possible that the vibration is a sign of bad wheel bearing(s), which will happily cause as many brake pads, calipers and rotors to get destroyed as you are willing to throw at it until you replace the bearing

The Scientist fucked around with this message at 21:38 on May 28, 2020

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe





Whiirrr posted:

Been trying to learn how to fix up a 1987 Toyota Pickup that's been sitting for awhile. I've only done some basic car maintenance things on my own, like oil, spark plugs, and that sorta thing. The problem is that the clutch pedal has around 2-3 inches of play before it starts to engage the clutch. Been trying to adjust the clutch pedal, but there's a nut that I can't loosen. I'm not sure if I'm doing something wrong or not. I've sprayed a ton of WD-40 on it and cleaned it, but I just can't turn it.

The problem nut:


Any tips on how to get the thing to move without stripping it?

That's a lot of play, more than could be dialled out with the pedal adjuster. Have you checked the clutch slave cylinder & reservoir to be sure the hydraulic system is still wet & sealed? Also: some slave cylinders have threaded adjustment on their pistons. Toyota used to.

spankmeister posted:

If that doesn't work, apply heat.

Can't with setting the instruments & wiring aflame.

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

The Scientist posted:

Would unscrewing the cap to the coolant reservoir on an overheated engine cause it to start gushing coolant out?

kid sinister posted:

Yes, and you'd probably scald yourself if you did so.

This is assuming that the reason it overheated wasn't because it had no coolant by the way.

The Scientist posted:

What's confusing about this to me is that it seems like most reservoirs aren't under pressure, since most of them have an overflow tube that dumps out any excess coolant once the reservoir gets too full. There's like no valve or anything

taqueso posted:

Absolutely do not do this, I learned the hard way 20 years ago and will never forget. Try as hard as you can to learn the easy way. A scalded face is not fun. It doesn't matter if there is gushing liquid or not, there will be superhot steam.
You should listen to these guys. I watched somebody learn it the hard way, which isn't quite the easy way, but it's easier than the hard way. You do NOT want to learn it the hard way.

Also, there absolutely is a valve, it's on the bottom of the cap.

Decent diagram here: http://www.streetrod101.com/rust-in...ing-system.html

Action Man
Jan 31, 2007



The Scientist posted:

Have you tried just setting the brakes in? Sometimes the rotors build up pad material on them, and you can get a nice clean surface again by accelerating to ~60 mph, and braking to 5 mph with successively harder braking, 6 times. On the 6th time, you should get right up to the point that ABS is engaging. Same thing you do when you put new pads on.

e: if there is some kind of otherwise unaccounted for metal on metal contact making the squeling, setting the brake pads in as above would be bad obviously.

Also possible that the vibration is a sign of bad wheel bearing(s), which will happily cause as many brake pads, calipers and rotors to get destroyed as you are willing to throw at it until you replace the bearing

I haven't noticed any play in wheels, would bearings only vibrate during braking? full disclosure, to my knowledge, the bearings have never been replaced.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

To add a bit of context, I wanted to add water to cool it down. It was "empty" because all the fluid was on the ground. Except it wasn't really empty. Thankfully I had sunglasses on.

The Scientist
Nov 6, 2009



Soiled Meat

Krakkles posted:

You should listen to these guys. I watched somebody learn it the hard way, which isn't quite the easy way, but it's easier than the hard way. You do NOT want to learn it the hard way.

Also, there absolutely is a valve, it's on the bottom of the cap.

Decent diagram here: http://www.streetrod101.com/rust-in...ing-system.html

Don't worry, I'm in no danger of doing this. Cooling systems and batteries get a lot of caution from me.

But here's what has me confused:



So I'm clear that there's a pressure valve in the radiator cap, and I definitely understand that if you unscrew the radiator cap of an overheating engine, boiling coolant will gush out and burn you. But I think on a lot of older cars, there is no pressure in the reservoir. I just checked my 2005 honda accord, and it doesn't have any kind of valve in the reservoir cap. I think that my 1992 MR2 (Rest In Peace) and my 1985 MR2 (Rest in Peace pt 2) were the same way. Don't remember about my '86 Pontiac 6000 s/e (Rust in Piss).

So it actually seems that the act of opening the reservoir itself won't cause it to gush coolant. Either the radiator cap valve is open - and the engine is already gushing steam and coolant - or its closed, in which case nothing overflowing into the reservoir.

Sorry if I'm being pedantic, just genuinely curious over here.


IOwnCalculus posted:

I wouldn't call it "most" but there are a lot of vehicles where the 'overflow tank' is part of the pressurized system and they usually don't have a separate radiator cap.

This seems to ring true, I feel like I've seen cars with closed systems like this poster says






Action Man posted:

I haven't noticed any play in wheels, would bearings only vibrate during braking? full disclosure, to my knowledge, the bearings have never been replaced.

It seems possible that the small change in toe-in/wheel alignment you get when braking could cause a bad bearing to torque in a way when braking that would make the wheel vibrate. But yeah what you're implying is true, vibrating only when braking is a classic brake symptom. The classic test for wheel bearing is to jack the car up and with the wheel on the ground, put your hands at 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock, and rock the wheel as hard as you can and feel for excess play. Same with 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock. But in my experience its hard to tell what is a normal amount of play. Also spin the wheel, abnormal resistance and or a grinding sound is a bad sign. You might also hear a whining/humming/grinding while driving, proportional to how fast the wheel is spinning.

Are you able to visually inspect the rotors, or is the wheel solid so that you can't see? Maybe you can look under the car at the rotor on the opposite side

IDK, vibration exclusively while braking makes me think brake problem, if you just changed the brakes that could mean brake problems secondary to bad wheel bearing(s). Sometimes the bearings or hub are real easy to replace and surprisingly cheap so maybe its worth looking into?



Sorry for walls of text & GBS 1.0 posting style

DrBouvenstein
Feb 28, 2007

I think I'm a doctor, but that doesn't make me a doctor. This fancy avatar does.


DrBouvenstein posted:

For the past month or so, my car (2008 Mazda 3) has been making a clicking noise from the passenger side ONLY when I brake. Pretty sure front, but hard to tell, it's not a loud sound, but I also know the front has more "stuff" than the rear, what with the steering and power linkages and whatnot.




Reposting for any thoughts?

Krakkles
May 5, 2003

like and subscribe for more passive-aggressive roadway bullshit adventure in Chigcao

The Scientist posted:

Don't worry, I'm in no danger of doing this. Cooling systems and batteries get a lot of caution from me.

But here's what has me confused:



So I'm clear that there's a pressure valve in the radiator cap, and I definitely understand that if you unscrew the radiator cap of an overheating engine, boiling coolant will gush out and burn you. But I think on a lot of older cars, there is no pressure in the reservoir. I just checked my 2005 honda accord, and it doesn't have any kind of valve in the reservoir cap. I think that my 1992 MR2 (Rest In Peace) and my 1985 MR2 (Rest in Peace pt 2) were the same way. Don't remember about my '86 Pontiac 6000 s/e (Rust in Piss).

So it actually seems that the act of opening the reservoir itself won't cause it to gush coolant. Either the radiator cap valve is open - and the engine is already gushing steam and coolant - or its closed, in which case nothing overflowing into the reservoir.

Sorry if I'm being pedantic, just genuinely curious over here.


This seems to ring true, I feel like I've seen cars with closed systems like this poster says
Yeah, at least on older cars, unpressurized overflows were very common. I have a weird combo - my 2000 Cherokee has this style (overflow unpressurized, separate pressure cap on radiator), but my 2000 Mustang has no separate overflow but a plastic tank separate to the radiator with a plastic pressure cap.

Most newer cars that I've seen lean more the direction of the mustang, but I'm not certain that it's 100% or anything.

If you do have the unpressurized overflow, you absolutely can open the overflow reservoir while hot without issue. You can also see it in action (pressure bypassing the radiator or fluid being drawn in) if you catch it at the right time and in right conditions - it makes cool noises.

DrBouvenstein posted:

Reposting for any thoughts?
I'd say either something is loose or something is stuck in the brakes, with a heavy lean toward the former. I'd pull the wheel off, and check everything touching the brakes.

The Scientist
Nov 6, 2009



Soiled Meat

DrBouvenstein posted:

Reposting for any thoughts?

The fact that it only happens when braking and also not when turning rules out CV axle, which was my first thought



That car has ABS, and the rotors usually have these hall effect sensors to detect wheel speed (the car's computer wants to know that the wheels never completely lock up, bc that's when its time to engage ABS). Could be related to that somehow? Is there an ABS light on in the dash by any chance?

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


DrBouvenstein posted:

Reposting for any thoughts?

FWIW, my car was doing this. It wound up being a cracked shim that goes between the pads and caliper bracket.

Random as hell. And it's doing it again on the other side now.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Update on my brake woes from a couple weeks ago. I changed the caliper with a brand new one from Rock Auto last night. Bled it, and all seems to be well. I checked the temps with my laser temp reader thing and both sides are within a dozen or so degrees of each other.

As an aside the parking brake seems to be holding equally on both sides which is weird since I didn't bother adjusting the cables or anything. I non-scientifically pulled the brake lever up, and tried turning the back wheels by hand, neither would move compared to a couple weeks ago when the one with the bad caliper wouldn't budge, but the good caliper would move (with resistance).

I also gave my front rotors a half assed resurfacing which seems to have reduced the pulsing pedal significantly. I asked around about getting the rotors machined, but every place wanted a half hour of labour for each one (~50 bucks each) which is more than what I paid for them brand new, with shipping and exchange rate.
So I took them off, and used an angle grinder with a knotted wire cup brush and scraped the poo poo out of the braking surfaces.
I checked them with my calipers and they seemed to be within a few thou at several different spots around so I figured that was good enough.

Since I don't have to return the old caliper for a core charge, I'm going to take it apart and see what the problem is since I've now replaced the caliper three times at that corner, for the same problem.

If I'm not too lazy of a sack of poo poo I'll post pics and whatnot of the disection somewhere in AI.

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STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


Slap some new rotors on the front. They're so cheap on Rockauto for most cars these days that there's no reason to bother resurfacing. Scrap value for iron is low enough that they're not even worth recycling, unless your area will accept iron with the normal recycling (mine specifically mentions brake rotors as not being accepted).

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