Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«12 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



shodanjr_gr posted:

What do you mean "California emissions"? Are Vettes destined for CA different mechanically or in terms of ECU calibration to meet different emissions standards?

Maybe not Corvettes specifically, but some cars do have mechanically distinct "California Emissions" models. These days I wanna say most cars have unified so that all cars meet those standards, but in certain cases the difference may cause the California models to be more expensive by enough margin that it makes sense to split them into their own production line (or setup within the same factory, whatever) because the expense is offset by how much cheaper the 49-state models are.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Keldoclock posted:

Hello thread! I am a dumb kid who drives a 1994 Jeep Wrangler.



So it's this little plastic tube with a stiff rubber seal, I pulled on it expecting it to come out, then when it didn't I grabbed the rubber bit with my other hand and just wiggled it back and forth, using more and more force until I freed it. When I get it out, it's got jagged edges, which makes me think I loving broke it. So I googled around and couldn't even find the name of the part, thought "gently caress it" and used some super-thick CA glue that I have for model aircraft and just smeared it on the inside of the seal and jammed the tube back in.

I haven't noticed any problems yet, but also I have no idea what to look for, and there are so many goddamn things broken or loose on my jeep that it's tough to hear changes in the sound of it when I drive.

Am I letting unfiltered air into my engine, or did I merely cause trouble for myself when I have to put another air filter in?

That looks like a PCV valve, excess crankcase pressure can blow seals out so they have that tube to route gases through the intake to be re-burned and sent out the exhaust.

A little leakage of outside air through wouldn't hurt much. I believe those engines are a MAP sensor setup, so they can compensate for vacuum leaks, you'd just have a slightly high idle. If it does have a MAF sensor it could run rough, but you'd notice that.

Either way, it won't do any harm; you didn't say but that looks like the 4.0, which is notorious for being an absolute tank of an engine. Still, look for a PCV valve if you're concerned, they're usually dirt cheap and an easy fix if you can get the broken bit out. Might be a good idea to replace the hose too, you can just get generic vacuum line from the parts store of the right inner diameter and cut to length.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Slavvy posted:

Will it make any difference if I use one or the other on a 1.3L engine with 88 horsepower and 200,000km?

Unless you're running literally an F1 engine, it won't make a difference in performance (and even then it's minor).

Just use normal copper plugs if you don't give a drat, platinums/iridiums if you don't wanna have to change em for 3-4 years. Multi-electrode whatever is pretty much universally a gimmick.

gvibes posted:

I saw a car in the parking lot with one of the five wheels lugs missing. Is that as much of a death trap as I think it is?

Rear wheel on a volvo xc90 in the unlikely event it matters.

One out of five is fine, it could make the rotors wear unevenly due to uneven stress but other than that the wheel's not gonna fall off. Rule of thumb is half minus one can usually go missing with no real issues, maybe minus 2 if it's a heavy duty truck (so 1 of 4, 2 of 5 or 6, etc).

OTOH, lug nuts are cheap, so an owner not replacing them can be a sign of other issues.

Fender Anarchist fucked around with this message at 03:28 on Feb 17, 2015

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Reverse has straight-cut gears to let the idler slide in and out, it's possible that the teeth are lined up just right that it's blocked and won't engage. Try having someone turn the wheels while you push into gear and see if it'll slip into place; if not, they might have screwed something up.

e: vv ehehehehehehehe vv

Fender Anarchist fucked around with this message at 20:34 on Feb 21, 2015

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Steal it, take it for a few laps around the nearest gravel quarry, return it saying "Congratulations, it's a real truck now. Never worry about scratching it again."

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Memento posted:

I think he means like the $50k+ Mercedes Benz sedan, not a Ford truck/van thingy.

me reed gud.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Rubber cement's loving weak though; I can see it not breaking under bending, but a CV boot gets stretched and compressed as it rotates around, I don't know if it would hold up to that sort of strain over the little surface area of a split.

RTV is what I'd try first. Best method OFC would be to disassemble and replace the boot, but they said they don't wanna do that.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



DesperateDan posted:

Crossposting from the mechanical failures thread, went out to check my fluids and pressures before a trip and found a flat.





Guessing these are too close to the sidewall to fix reliably? I tried inflating anyway to see what would happen and air was pissing out of both holes.

Regardless of location, long gashes like that are typically not patchable, and those probably are too close to boot. You're probably looking at a new tire.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Been having A/C issues on the Protege, it acts like it's freezing up. Hooked gauges up; static pressure is fine, while running it reaches good pressure, but then the compressor keeps drawing up the pressure difference; I saw readings in the vacuum range on the low side. Do I have a hosed pressure switch that just lets the compressor run full time, or what?

I did throw a can of refrigerant in just in case; no change, and it actually started cycling when the high side pressure spiked to like 400 psi. This was last night and nothing is any better today, and I suppose it'll be venting itself back down to more sane pressures later tonight.

E: Also it's a TXV system, not fixed orifice.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



gently caress, and those usually require a compressor, don't they. God dammit.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Drunk Pledge Driver posted:

Is it less work to just swap the whole axle?

For the whole axle It's a matter of unbolting the driveshaft, shocks, springs, brake lines and any sensors; installation is the reverse of removal.

Just replacing the diff gears requires draining the diff, unbolting the driveshaft, breaking the pinion nut loose, pulling the axles (which usually involves partially disassembling the brakes), unbolting the carrier, installing the new carrier, checking side clearance, installing the new pinion, checking backlash and pinion depth, swapping out shims, checking again, tightening a crush sleeve (I've broken numerous breaker bars doing this step)...

There's a reason nobody sets up diffs unless it's an old rare unit or for a performance application. Just swap the axle.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Thunder Moose posted:

New driver - car is a 2001 Buick Century

When I drive out of my parking lot - which has a fairly steep ramp, I notice the bottom scrapes against the concrete. I assume this is problematic but wish to know to what degree and if any tips on alleviating the problem are available.

Is the scraping happening between going up a ramp onto a level surface, or down onto it? The former means the middle of the car is scraping, the latter means it's your bumper(s).

Neither is super serious on a FWD car, but while the bumpers scraping is a purely cosmetic thing, the middle scraping can dent your exhaust or fold the pinch welds flat so the car's harder to jack up. Either way, not much you can do about it short of buying a vehicle with more ground clearance. Maybe try taking the crossing at an angle if at all possible instead of going straight up/down.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Fart Pipe posted:

My step mom has a 95 Del Sol base model and it quit running today on the highway. My dad was driving it and it just stopped running. Are those Hondas in the vintage that the main relay might be the problem? He said that when he tried to start it again it sounded normal so Im thinking/hoping it wasnt the timing belt. I asked him to turn the key on so see what lights came on and the only one he recalled seeing was the battery light. IIRC the airbag/check engine/brake light should come on too, does that sound like its the main relay? Would the engine crank if the main relay quit? I havent looked at it myself yet, probably tomorrow.

Just to clarify, did he get it running again? If so definitely not the timing belt.

We had a 96 Acura a while back that ended up being a main relay so it's definitely the right year range.

IDK what else it runs but the main relay does run the fuel pump, which is what causes the no start (and the shutoff in this case if that's the problem); the starter/ignition is on a separate circuit, so it should crank just fine.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



killingthebest posted:

It's not holding a charge, I've all the connections and tubing replaced for leaks - including the condenser (it was pushing the refrigerant into my transmission fluid). It's still not holding a charge for longer than a day, which is frustrating.

The compressor passed testing, so I'm not really sure what to try next!

Have you checked the evaporator? If you have a UV light, I'd shine it on the evaporator drain under the truck.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



kastein posted:

I would have called bullshit on "pushing refrigerant into the transmission fluid" until last weekend, when I had the pleasure of working on the cooling and transmission cooler systems on your vehicle's near twin, a 2004. Such a weird failure mode.

What a stupid loving design that combined atx/refrigerant cooler is.

At least it doesn't disable the vehicle like the Escape hybrid; it has a second evaporator/fan for the battery, and it's engineered to need that chilled air, so if your A/C fails the cabin air is inadequate cooling and the battery overheats.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Speaking as a former tech... uh. Hrm.

We're told road-forcing can make a difference in certain difficult cases, but I've never seen it done on a real car, just loose wheels for training purposes. No idea if it actually makes a noticeable difference in road feel.

Something to check for (depending on the vehicle) is brake rotor/drum clips, these guys:



Factory wheels have a space cast into them on the flange to clear them, but some aftermarket wheels don't have the space. If the clip is left on it can cause the wheel to not be flush when mounted and cause vibration that way even if they're perfectly balanced on the machine.

The clips are only for assembly line purposes and are 100% unnecessary on the finished car; they leave them on because it's cheaper to cast the space into the wheel than add an extra step in the factory to remove them.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



True, but it works just fine for a 1-day test to see if the weight helps.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



And actually it depends on what scanner they use. Most of the handheld ones they use at parts stores will see airbag codes are there but not be able to read them, but others can't even detect them, only basic powertrain codes.

I'd take it to a real shop and have them check it out just to be absolutely sure. Maybe do it with an oil change if you've got one due soon.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Omglosser posted:

09 Pontiac Vibe 2.4L(Toyota 2AZ-FE) AWD 115k
I was just playing around with my new OBDII scanner and I noticed this:

Foot off the pedal:


Pedal to the floor:


Basically I'm wondering if I need to replace the TB or the pedal sensor? Or is there something else going on?

Slavvy posted:

Or are you expecting both accelerator position percentages to be the same? Cause that's normal. What do you actually think is wrong with your car, if anything?

I think he's expecting the positions to read 0 and 100%, which will never be the case.

Sensors run on 5V power. 5 volts represents 100% sensor reading, 0v represents 0. Now say you unplug the sensor; (or the sensor fails) it reads 0 volts, 0%, but if the computer thinks that's just normal no-pedal, it can't tell anything's wrong. Similarly, if a short occurs bypassing the resistor in the sensor and it gets constant 5 volt power, it'll interpret that as wide open throttle and happily redline the engine until you turn the key off.

Having the "off pedal" and "max pedal" positions represented by non-0/non-100% positions lets the computer tell when the sensor fails in one of those two ways. It's a fail-safe. It still knows that 15.7% sensor position is zero throttle, and 80% sensor is max throttle.

If the engine responds appropriately at all pedal positions, and doesn't idle at 3000 rpm, stop worrying about it.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



SperginMcBadposter posted:

Which parts do you mean? The steering rack itself or the connecting stuffs?

Could be rack, tie rod ends, control arm bushings, strut mounts... basically you need to get it in the air and inspect everything on the front end.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



some texas redneck posted:

I've only owned one car that didn't have hubcaps.

FWIW, some cars have the hubcaps held on either by the lugnuts (Honda comes to mind, they have a plastic piece near the base of the lugnuts that holds them on) or plastic "lugnuts" that thread into the real lugnuts (GM).

Or like the old town cars, held by a keyed bolt onto a hat type structure, which in turn is held on by the lug nuts. Biggest pain in the rear end rotation I ever did.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Blow posted:

I'm not driving the car. It's just hard to wrench on it where it currently is.

Dunno if the brake disc is machinable. As I said, looks quite hosed.

Needs more mechanic.

Just more $$$.

Honestly even if they are machinable it's usually more cost effective to just put new rotors on.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



SperginMcBadposter posted:

I've got a misfire code on my '04 dakota again. Last time I changed out all the spark plugs (they were pretty old) and the ignition coil for the cylinder(coil-on-plug design) and it didn't come back. Also the truck hasn't been driven in almost two months, but I don't know if that would contribute to it at all.

The check engine light came on within a minute of me starting the engine. I don't know why theres a pending temperature related code, torque was showing a normal temperature when I plugged the reader in. What should I check next for that misfire?

Is it the same cylinder as before? Did you replace all the coil packs, or just the one that was misfiring at the time?

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Well it depends on whether your blue car has an LSD on the front axle, if the damage is on that axle. (Don't be cagey about what your car is, we can help you better if we know what you drive!)

Aside from that, what matters more than mileage is remaining tread depth on the other tire; some sport tires would be nearly done at 7k, while hard economy tires might just be breaking in. Generally I'd say if there's more than 2/32"-3/32" difference between the current tires and a new set of the same type I'd get two for sanity's sake.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Fun fact, legend has it that the phrase "It's a doozy" came from Duesenberg references (ie "Duesey").

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Slavvy posted:

I'm also pretty sure the power disparity between the duesenbergs and an average car for the time was greater (proportionally) than the difference between a Veyron and an average camry/accord type car today.

Veyron GT has 1200 hp to a V6 Camry's 268, a ratio of about 4.5:1.

A Duesenberg supercharged straight-8 made 320 hp to a Model A's 40, a ratio of 8:1.

So it was nearly twice as more-awesome-than-a-normal-car as the Veyron.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Geoj posted:

OTOH I can't imagine trying to get 320 WHP down to the ground on turn-of-the century skinny tires and with an open differential...

It was sold in the 30s, tires were getting pretty decent by then. As for traction, I doubt that was much of a problem considering

"wiki posted:

Duesenbergs generally weighed around two and a half tons; up to three tons was not unusual, considering the wide array of custom coachwork available.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



A MAF sensor gasket can absolutely cause a vacuum leak; replace that first since it's probably cheap, definitely cheaper than anything EGR. You can spray brake cleaner (or any sort of flammable aerosol chemical) around that pipe joint, if the idle raises you've found the culprit. (beware of false negatives though)

Also, if it's set up like some hondas with two separate ports inside the throttle body (before the butterfly) for the electronic and thermostatic IAC valves, you can check by covering each port in turn and see if it drops the idle.

Fender Anarchist fucked around with this message at 18:31 on Apr 7, 2015

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



some texas redneck posted:

(you've already had to replace the battery? )

Check your trunk-battery privilege there boy.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Looks like the clip of a mechanical pencil or similar.

I almost guarantee that's the leak, but you can splash some soapy water on there to be sure. You might be able to just yank it out, or it might break and then you'd have to have a shop dismount it, get the piece out, and remount.

Might be a good idea anyway just to make sure the bead isn't damaged; I doubt soft plastic like that would do anything, but it never hurts to be too careful, especially anything tire-related.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Another thing to consider: a lot of tire chains now will match Tire Rack's price if you ask them about it, with the added benefit of getting their road hazard coverage, which they usually won't do for tires you bring in.

E: I know this is AI and we're all about doing your own work, but tire mounting is one of those things where it really just isn't worth it.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



I can't speak on the LED/high power bulb stuff, but vibration kills light bulbs by shaking (and overstressing) the metal filament, causing it to break. HIDs, being an arc between two beefy electrodes, do not have this problem, so you're probably fine on her car.

On that note, was your car offered with HIDs in that model year? If so, you might be able to get a set of housings, ballast and bulbs to use in your car.

E: I say this because although LEDs put out plenty of light, they're also blinding, so you'd pretty much have to trigger them off the high beam circuit (are your high beams too dim or just the low beams?), and honestly they're generally overkill for on-road use.

Fender Anarchist fucked around with this message at 02:42 on Apr 12, 2015

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



It's a good option, provided it's done right; I'd venture to say that 99.9% of "DOT APPROVED" kits out there are crap for doing anything but spray light all over the road (ie not in the direction you're looking).

If you don't mind, what model is your car? It would help to be able to look up, like I said, if it came with HIDs as an option.

If not, there are ways to retrofit the proper projector into your existing housings, but it's a fair bit of work (having to align the projectors properly in the housing, calibrate/attach level sensor if applicable, etc.)

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Did the shaking start soon after replacing the pads/rotors? Rotors can sometimes have thickness variations straight out of the box. Maybe see about getting them machined (the shop may or may not require you to get new pads, it's a policy at some places.)

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Leperflesh posted:

Some race cars deliberately use straight-cut forward gears (I think it's a stronger setup? Can deal with more torque?) and they're noisy as gently caress.

Lesson time!

Helical and straight cut gears can deal with the same amount of torque... hypothetically. Each tooth is just as beefy no matter the cut.

Take a look at this picture, though:



Imagine grabbing the left gear and turning it clockwise (visible teeth to the left) while the other gear is held stationary. You can see the helical teeth would act like a screw, driving the gear upward. This happens in real gearboxes due to the heavy load on the output gear from the car's weight. Given a high enough power input, the upward force (along the gear's shaft) can actually cause the case to flex and let the gear and shaft move, such that less of the gear's total surface area is transmitting the same amount of force, which puts more strain on the teeth. Go too far, and you get this:



Note that the small gear on the input shaft is sheared on the right (it was pushed left), and vice versa for the large gear.

There's 3 ways to fix this:

1. Use a stiffer case. This means either good engineering and slightly more metal (expensive to design) or lots more metal (expensive to produce due to material cost, and heavy, bad for both road and race cars.)

2. Use herringbone gears like this, which produce opposing thrust forces that cancel out:



Silent like helical gears, but much more expensive to produce; you typically only see these on high-end sports cars and the like, where both high power levels and noise concerns are present.

3. Straight-cut gears, the go-to solution for race cars. Cheap to make, simple, and keeps the case light, at the expense added benefit of awesome noise.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



Sadi posted:

So I have an intermittent starting problem. 97 Honda Civic 5 speed. When it works everything is normal. When it doesn't start you hear the starter solenoid click but the starter doesn't turn. Using a trouble light I see the starter has power, the solenoid sees power but the bridge from the solenoid to the starter does not get energized when the car will not start. I have tried connecting that bridge to 12V and the starter turns. The kicker though is that when the clutch is pressed and the solenoid clicks, I can jump the starter motor so that it spins but it is rotating freely with no engagement.

I'm a little lost on this. I figure a new starter will probably fix it, but I would rather not blow money on a beater if the part isn't bad.

First off, use a voltmeter, not a trouble light; one possibility is corrosion inside the cable increasing resistance, causing an excessive voltage drop. Enough to light a bulb, but not run a starter motor that draws 100A or more in normal operation.

Is it definitely the solenoid clicking when you turn the key? Have someone else turn it while you feel the solenoid to make sure. It's rare for a solenoid to fail in such a way that it engages (clicks) but doesn't transmit power; usually the magnetic coil (the actual solenoid) burns out.

The free spinning sounds like either you have a broken tooth on the flywheel, or the mechanism that shoots the pinion gear out to engage the flywheel is defective.

I'd take the starter off, have it tested at a parts store, and turn the engine at least a complete revolution by hand while inspecting the flywheel teeth, which should be visible with the starter removed.

E: Actually, I just found this:



I guess some starters the solenoid has to be engaged to engage the flywheel; I'd only heard of the self-actuating bendix-type units. That's another data point in favor of a bad solenoid.

Fender Anarchist fucked around with this message at 18:06 on Apr 24, 2015

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



To crush the muscle cars, see them driving behind you, and hear the induction of the VTEC.

I think the EG is still the go-to model generally speaking, you can play legos to get the drivetrain you want.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



If your poo poo's so hosed that gaskets have been replaced by solidified oil sludge, it needs repair. The crud would probably get knocked loose anyway.

And shouldn't have formed in the first place if you've stayed on top of oil changes.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



If it was charging at first and only went red later you didn't hook it up backwards.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



I dunno when they changed over, but older Hondas the engine spins backwards (counterclockwise at the pulley end), so that would actually tighten the bolt more.

Is the engine held in place and the bolt just won't budge, or is the engine spinning when you try and loosen it? They do make a tool that slots into the pulley to hold it still if that's the case.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«12 »