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Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Lets see if the new thread can help me with this issue that I'm still fighting.

97 Toyota Tercel with a 4E-FE. Efi is a simple MAP sensor system with an electronic distributor, one 02 sensor and not much else. Pretty normal for a late 90's toyota, almost identical system to a 4AFE. I have thus far replaced the distributor (old one was completely knackered), MAP sensor, ISCV (old one was clogged to poo poo), cleaned the TB, seafoamed the engine, plugs, O2 sensor and engine temp sensor.

The issue: cold idles perfectly. As the car heats up, the idle reduces in speed (normal) but also gets quite rough and lumpy when the car is in D or R (in neutral it's ok). This is fine during the day, but putting electrical load on by switching on the headlights makes the idle drop down to an uncomfortably low speed that causes the steering wheel and whole car to shake. It never stalls, it never hesitates taking off from a stop, never stutters, drives perfectly. It just doesn't seem to be able to compensate for added electrical load by bringing the idle up slightly. Having an indicator going while you're stopped in D makes the idle fluctuate up and down in time with the indicator turning on and off.

I'm at a loss as to what else to look for/do. It's like the car just won't behave as designed and it isn't a faulty component that I can find.

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Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Intake manifold has a grand total of 3 vacuum lines (booster, pcv, evap canister). It isn't leaking.

I know conventional wisdom indicates that solid tappet Toyotas never go out of spec and even when they do, it makes gently caress all difference to anything, but could loose clearances do this?

Forgot to mention: chucked a set of junkyard injectors at it, made no difference at all, so I'm assuming the injectors are OK at 190,000km.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

IAT readings are sensible. Don't think the car has the ability to correct long-term, or if it does both scan tools I've hooked to it can't display them for some reason (modern cars work perfectly). It isn't OBDII fwiw. I can't picture it being anything a/f ratio related like a temp sensor because it runs perfectly, it just won't idle fast enough when it has electrical load.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

mr.belowaverage posted:

No, it does not.


Unplug the MAF. Any change?
Phyiscally remove the crank sensor and check for oil in the connector.


Unplug every sensor. Does it idle on ECM default readings?

Good idea, I'll try this when I get home.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Slavvy posted:

Good idea, I'll try this when I get home.

Quoting for progress. Car runs with every sensor disconnected. Connecting them one by one led to not much change in idle until the engine temp sensor, which caused a noticeable drop (like 450-500rpm in D/R with low beams, indicator and windscreen wipers going). Guess I have to re-examine that, now.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

kastein posted:

AquarianFire, the injectors weren't at fault, if they get told by the ECU to run that fast, they do. Something was screwy with the fuel management system and it probably wouldn't have cost that much to fix it, but oh well. I looked at the wiring diagrams and it appears that it was a modern engine with upstream catalytic converters and four oxygen sensors. If anything since half the engine was running rich I would have put my money on an upstream O2 sensor being worn out or damaged. The reason this causes stuff like that is that the oxygen sensors detect unburned oxygen in the exhaust. If one is reading the wrong value, or there's an exhaust leak that's letting in extra oxygen upstream of the sensor, they crank the fuel input up more to compensate for the "lean condition" they see, which doesn't help because the sensor's hosed or there's an air leak that's throwing the reading off, so you end up with every cylinder that sensor is reporting on running full-rich mode.

Oh well - too late now. Next time, be aware at worst you could probably get a grand or two for it on craigslist if you felt like dealing with it, which is way more than junkyards pay.

The problem here is that probably 99% of mechanics have no real idea how electronics or EFI systems work, and just throw expensive parts (which usually aren't the problem) until the customer either gets tired of spending money or they find the problem by accident. It's a bad state of things and I really wish it wasn't that way.


That's entirely expected, it's going from full high resistance, open circuit (usually reads as HOLY gently caress THIS ENGINE IS COLD AS HELL AHHHHHH FULL COLD START MAX INJECTOR PULSEWIDTH IMMEDIATELY) to a sane, up to temp CTS reading when you plug it in, so now it's acting like it knows what temp it's at.

Now, why it's aiming so low for idle speed when warmed up, I have no loving clue. I don't know Toyota EFI that well.

The idle speed is reasonable if it's warm and you have no electrical stuff going. Turning on the headlights, then the wipers, then the indicator makes the idle progressively drop each time when it's in D. It just can't seem to bring the idle up to compensate but I don't know if that's because it is physically unable to, or if it's getting a bunk signal from something and running too rich for the temperature.

I'll replace the coolant temp sensor because I'm running out of poo poo to throw at it; at this rate I'll have an entirely new engine management system and still no fix. At least parts cost a pittance.

Motronic posted:

No. I don't know where he got that idea.

Spinning the tires won't do anything at all to destroy the diff. Heavily loading them repeatedly to spin them will obviously cause issues (like on dry pavement), but that has little to to with FWD/open diff/LSD. But the most likely place to break parts when spinning tires - which again has nothing to do with FWD/open diff/etc - is when they're spinning and you suddenly regain traction, like going from mud to dry tarmac or spinning on a patch of ice and then hitting dry hitting tarmac.

Nah. Spinning one tyre on an open diff is a great way to shatter the spider gears. When I worked at toyota we were doing Hiace diffs all the time because of over-zealous courier drivers parking them in mud and spinning up one of the wheels. There was a petition of sorts to convince Toyota to fit them with the Hilux LSD to stop this happening.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Assuming you don't have a scan tool that can go beyond just looking at fault codes, unplug an injector and stick a pulse led on it to see if they're getting a signal.

Has it got an immobiliser? And is this a 1SZ or a 1/2NZ engine?

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

mr.belowaverage posted:

No immobilizer, looks to be the 1nz-fe.

Pulse led? Is that some kind of special injector pulse reading tool? Or just any test light?

What would cause all the injectors to fail a week after running fine? Or are we thinking they aren't getting the signal to fire?

I'll check that and anything I can read off a scan tool tomorrow.

I want to get this going for my mom but not if it's going to be unreliable. And after she just bought me a car for my birthday!


It's basically a little round plastic disc with an LED inside and two terminals. You plug it into an injector connector to see if the injector's getting a pulse - safer for the ecu than a test light.

The fact that it's no fuel AND no spark makes me think CKPS, look at the live data and see if you can see both crank and cam sensor signals.

The 1NZ is by far the better of the two engines. They're usually extremely dependable; they have like two issues, both of which you can avoid if you just change the oil like a sane person.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

You're meant to stop when grease starts peeking out from the boot.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

More Tercel adventures.

I bought a vacuum gauge of decent quality and hooked it up. When the car is hot and idling in neutral, the gauge actually reads above the 'healthy' range. I don't understand how this can be since it's a 4EFE and not an F1 engine so theoretically shouldn't be drawing more vacuum than normal. When I put it in D and put a bunch of electrical loads on it so the idle starts chugging as it is wont to do, vacuum drops into the 'normal' range. I don't understand. How can my car have super manifold vacuum? I expected a leak or something.

This is really frustrating because I genuinely believed the gauge would reveal something useful and instead all signs point to a perfectly healthy engine that just won't idle for poo poo.

e: worth mentioning the needle very rapidly flickers like half a point consistently, but I'm putting this down to the idle just being shaky as gently caress and not an actual issue.

Slavvy fucked around with this message at 06:08 on Feb 12, 2015

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Krakkles posted:

What kind of vacuum gauge did you get? "Healthy" and "Normal" are not vacuum readings.

Also, are you thinking you have a vacuum leak and you're trying to find it with this? Because ... that's not how you do that.

Yes it is, that's (partly) what a vacuum gauge is for. Normal being around 17-22 inches of mercury, my car is around 25. I don't know how to answer your question beyond it being a vacuum gauge explicitly designed for this purpose. I was actually hoping to discover incorrect ignition timing or something like that.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Motronic posted:

I think he was getting at the fact that you used "normal" as a measure. None of that matters diagnostically. What matters are real number and how it's moving in which conditions.

It's not complicated, but it's not something like "between x and y is fine."

Here's the best thing I could come up with. Feel free to ignore the article, I sure did. What matters is on the bottom. Click the scenario buttons until you find what yours is doing.

Which article...?

Also, every diagnostic vaccum gauge I've seen has a green zone around the numbers I stated that's 'normal'. Vacuum readings don't vary much from engine size/configuration as long as there's no forced induction involved; an engine in good condition and a good state of tune will always pull around 18-22 inches. My engine pulls more than that which makes no sense. The needle doesn't fluctuate or flutter or anything, it just sits steady with a shaking that matches the idle shake.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Motronic posted:

Sorry, forgot to link it:
http://www.secondchancegarage.com/public/186.cfm

As to the rest.....yes, most vacuum gauges have that. It doesn't mean it's all that matters or even how to most effectively use a vacuum gauge. To diagnose what you are now describing it would be best to do things like snapping the throttle to see what the readings look like, running at higher RPMs, etc.

Vacuum rises with RPM when the throttle plate is closed like under deceleration. Under some conditions/configurations I could see this happening with a high idle or wonky valve timing/incorrect preload or advanced ignition timing. Just what is this thing idling at without load?

I've looked at that site, it does none of those things. In every respect it behaves like a normal engine except for the vacuum being quite high at idle.

It idles around 900 without load when it's fully warmed up; putting it in D and switching on all the lights and wipers makes it drop to around 500. It never stalls or hesitates, it just has a really low chugging idle. I'm due for a cambelt and it has a leaking crank seal so the belt could be stretched, maybe? It's the only explanation I can think of because it's the only thing I haven't hosed around with.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

some texas redneck posted:

The 900 RPM idle easily explains the high vacuum.

I forget - did you try swapping the IACV for a known good one already? And at least on some Hondas (yeah, I know it's a Toyota), I know they have some bypass ports in the throttle body to keep it idling if the IACV packs it in, if they get clogged up then you get a wonky idle. The cambelt tensioner should take up any slack from stretching, unless the belt is so stretched that it's about to jump/break.

Yeah I have, as well as a replacement map sensor and a rebuilt distributor. The latter was definitely making it suffer because it was leaking oil internally and had a cracked coil. I got a noticeable increase in power after doing this but the idle didn't change which steered me away from anything ignition related.

The belt tensioner is just a manual one that you set and forget.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Sentient Data posted:

(as well as rear disc inside the drum for parking brake, but I'm not messing with that)

Wait, what?

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

melon cat posted:

2009 Hyundai Elantra GLS.

I was backing into a tiny garage (there's barely a few inches of clearance on both sides of the doorway), then this happened:






How difficult is it to replace a side view mirror? And roughly what kind of cost can I expect for an OEM replacement mirror?

The small triangular black panel on the inside of the door opposite the mirror pries of. Start at the top. It may have a little tweeter built in, the plug will be tucked down behind the door card but you can tug it out and disconnect it (or just let the whole thing dangle). There are three 10mm nuts holding the mirror on with studs, there may also be a plastic clippy type thing that you just pull on to remove. The wiring for the mirror will have a connector down behind the door card, clipped to the skin. You can usually undo these without taking the door card off, but if you absolutely have to do it it's easy and simple.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

You can actually take it off by hand; I do them at work all the time without a tool. Just wind the window down and be persistent with pulling at the edges.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

melon cat posted:

I'll try that. Thanks.

My Elantra is a dark gray colour. But it isn't just "gray". It has a bit of... glitter. Well, not really glitter. But it's a subtle "sparkle" within the body paint. I'm not sure how I'd locate a spraypaint with a colour like that at a local hardware store. But in case I am I able to find it- what kind of primer is best for car paint?

How expensive is stuff like this at bodyshops over there?

Here you just get your paint code from the dealer, give it to a shop and you'll probably pay around $150.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Michael Scott posted:

I've got a 2004 Camry LE. I've got a transmission question. It has what I think is a 4-speed automatic that is known for being reliable, but I've got an issue. If I get on the highway within 15-20 minutes of starting the engine, it has trouble upshifting enough.

This is not a cold start followed by getting on the freeway immediately. Even if I drive around for a while until the temp needle moves to almost halfway, this still happens. I'll get on the highway, merge at 50-60MPH, but the RPMs will be stuck at 4, 5 or even approaching 6k. I'm on the highway in medium traffic usually so it's not like I can slow to a crawl or speed up to 80MPH to encourage my transmission to shift. So I will be forced to let the engine race, usually for a few minutes or a few miles, at which point it will suddenly upshift and return to normal at ~2-2.5k at 60MPH. By the way I use cruise control often, but this happens whether or not I use cruise. I'll turn off cruise and try every position of the accelerator pedal to encourage it to shift, but nothing will work until it just decides to after some time on the highway. I'm worried I'm doing some damage or at least wasting gas by letting the engine race.

I know the previous owner took care of the car. It is very low mileage. I just rolled it over to 30k miles. I don't believe the AT Fluid has been changed in its 11-year life, which wasn't concerning because of the low miles, but could old fluid be causing this issue?

Though it previously had a low mileage life, I now drive it at a normal interval, a hundred miles a week maybe.

Change your trans fluid and hope the trans isn't rooted beyond repair.

Usually when a car does something like this the best course of action is not to just keep driving while it gets worse.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Raluek posted:

I don't know anything about these cars, but is it possible that it's an electronic auto that isn't getting the correct tps reading? Like, it thinks you're at WOT all the time so it tries to hold the gear as long as possible? My first thought was vacuum modulator, but I'd hope they aren't still using those on a car that new.

On that car engine computer and trans computer are the same thing.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

tuyop posted:

Thanks for the warning. I knew it could be awful.

The sound seems to be gone now and
I can't see anything wrong, though. What could make it intermittent like that? It was doing it constantly for at least two days before.

It sounds exactly like a stone between the disc and backing plate.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

In this situation you should take the shoes off, clean the back plate, apply some grease to the little shoulders where the shoes touch the plate and use some sandpaper to chamfer the sharp edges of the shoes. Never fails.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Because putting effort into their vehicle is anathema for 90% of owners. It's an appliance that takes care of itself until you send it to the mechanic for service.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

My car takes NGK plug BKR5EY-11. I can get BKR5ES-11 for next to nothing and have fitted those with no apparent issues. What is the purpose of the v-grooved electrode? I remember reading somewhere that it's an anti-fouling measure but I can't imagine how it would make any difference and after several thousand km my plugs aren't fouled at all despite it being an old Toyota.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

totalnewbie posted:

It's to theoretically control the location of the spark better for ignitability. The spark preferentially goes to edges, so having the V-groove means the spark preferentially sparks towards the center of the plug, rather than all around the edges. It's not an anti-fouling measure.

Will it make any difference if I use one or the other on a 1.3L engine with 88 horsepower and 200,000km?

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

melon cat posted:

Just following up on my smashed side-mirror.


I tried to remove that black panel (circled in green). But had no luck getting it off after an hour of swearing and fighting with it. Then, I heard the crackle of plastic, so I stopped pulling at it. I tried pulling it off both by hand and through the use of a slotted screwdriver. but only the top corner was coming off.

Also- how do I determine if my sideview mirror is a heated one? Just asking for when I order a replacement piece online (there are heated and non-heated versions). I noticed two cables attached to the mirror glass's rear (circled in red). Does this indicate that the mirror is heated?




Well poo poo melon cat, how did I miss this?

You need to do that with the door and window open. See if you can get the screwdriver down to one of the securing lug things.

Godholio posted:

I'd pull that plastic off. Worst case is you break it and have to find one in a junkyard for $5. Best case is that it's held on by those little trim clips that run 3 for a buck and the crackling you hear is the sound they make as they come free.


Probably this.

E: in fact:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m77MhC4rj5Q

Later models identical.

Slavvy fucked around with this message at 07:52 on Feb 17, 2015

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

melon cat posted:

Huzzah! You were both right. All I had to do was open the door, then the panel finally came off. I was keeping it closed because of how cold it is outside.



That's a good idea. I'll do that.

Thanks to all of you guys for your help, on this. It's good to know that I won't have to get totally robbed by the local garage for this type of repair.

You're a good sport, you'll get there. I see you're lucky and have the sort where the mirror plug is right there!

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

The function of an anti roll bar is to counteract body roll; they're on practically every car with every suspension design (yes I know corvettes blah blah shutup) because they're a cheap and extremely effective way to firm up handling whilst having good ride comfort/stability in a straight line. Even the live-axle mustang has one. I don't think the type of suspension has any bearing on it whatsoever because every modern macpherson car I've seen has the swaybar connected with dainty, sometimes plastic links that aren't really any good for transmitting loads outside of vertical. Other suspension designs like double wishbone, simulated pivot, super strut etc all use the same principle with similar designs.

Sharknose BMW's are one car I can think of where the sway bar fitted directly into the lower arm but I don't think it did anything beyond making the wheel shake annoyingly on e21's if your wheel alignment and bushes were anything other than perfect.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

That looks like one of the holes for the plastic triangular trim lugs. It has nothing to do with the mirror, the mirror is only held on by the three 10mm bolts.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

IOwnCalculus posted:

Yeah, the only two V8s (that aren't the diesel) listed on Rockauto are both small-blocks and only differ internally. They both use PH5 (or equivalent) oil filters.

I find it strange that the 4.3 didn't use the same filter, even though it's based on the SBC as well.

They probably figured that while they were saving money cutting down an SBC to make a v6, they might as well save some more money and make it use an oil filter off an iron duke or something.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Do me and everyone else reading this an enormous favour. Remove your broken mirror from your car. Then take a picture of both mirrors side by side with the mating surface facing the camera.

To clarify: the image where you have circled a hole in green is a picture of the door. Not the mirror. The only parts of the mirror on the inside of the door is the connector and the three studs with 10mm nuts on them.

e: the only other possibility I can see here is that the factory mirror has a plastic dowel that slips into that hole and the aftermarket mirror doesn't. In which case: don't worry about it and just put the mirror on the car.

Slavvy fucked around with this message at 06:49 on Feb 20, 2015

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.


Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

American ownership laws are strange and retarded, I must say.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

I remember the factory owner's manual for my e23 said that if you shouldn't over-fill the engine oil, but if you do, any excess oil will be consumed

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Reverse is a dog gear so it could be that the teeth just aren't lined up; normally you would put it in neutral (with the engine running) and pump the clutch to try spin the shafts a little bit and let it engage. Not being able to get into gears with the car switched off doesn't really tell you anything.

e: fucknaaaaaaaag!!

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

It won't be the gearbox. Have you considered it being a blown engine mount?

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Tomarse posted:

No I haven't but I will put them on the list to check. I have my garage dwelling saab now starting on the key so I can get it out and put the Aygo in the dry to look at it

Dave - there was definitely slight wear in one of the pivot points. Didn't look like much though. Looking at parts availability it looks like the cables themselves are common replacement items. Bought myself a haynes and it covers cable replacement but in typical haynes style refitting is reverse of removal and it doesn't go into the adjustment but just says 'check that all gears can be selected afterwards'. Great

Those cables are usually fixed length and don't have any adjustment, unless the Aygo is really really different to most Toyotas.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

ROFLburger posted:

So I got the car assembled and running. drove around the block, but could not engage reverse. I tried a few things and found that while stationary, cycling into a few of the drive gears before attempting to engage reverse does the trick. Popping it into 1st -> 2nd -> 6th (or whatever) and then reverse engages perfectly smooth. Anyone know what the hell that's all about? Is engaging the other gears first like slightly rotating the shaft enough to get dog teeth in on reverse?

From what I've read it seems this isn't particularly abnormal on this car, even after a rebuild, so I'm not really concerned about it. Does anyone think I should be?

Seems totally normal. Do as instructed above.

Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Cage posted:

99 ford explorer 4.0 sohc

Last week my heater worked great, one day in stop and go traffic I noticed it wasn't quite so warm but just assumed it was because I was mostly idling. Now I can drive for 45 minutes and the air never gets above "very slightly warm", it just slowly got cooler and cooler over a week or so. The extent of my knowledge is to check for coolant, and I have plenty in the tank and in the radiator itself.

My coolant temperate guage doesnt work so I was going to just blindly buy a temp sensor to fix that and a thermostat hoping mine is stuck open. Anything else to look or check for?

Put a ziptie around a shock or something else convenient and have the tail pointing at the rim (not the tyre). Trim the cable tie so that it only clears the rim by a couple of millimetres, then spin the wheel and see if it touches it anywhere.

Usually if you can feel the effects of a damaged wheel while driving, you can see it visually pretty easily.

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Slavvy
Dec 11, 2012

Absolutely the most reliable, easiest to maintain motorcycles on the road today...Yah cunts.

Senior Funkenstien posted:

Alright guys I have a friend that wrecked her 2000 I think Honda CRV. She's a tiny lady at about 5' 9". We are trying to find her a good reliable SUV similar in size(or kinda close) as the CRV. Can you guys give some recommendations? I've searched Kia Sportages and Saturn Vues and recommended them to her but I'd like some more varied opinions.

I can speak to the current sportage being extremely reliable. I don't know if your market gets the 2.0 but the 2.4 is grunty, solid and reasonably fuel efficient. There was a recall concerning the trans cooler leaking into the radiator but this may or may not have affected your market and certainly won't matter if she's buying new.

It also has a 6 speed auto which puts it above most competitor vehicles AFAIK; the difference is noticeable and it's a trouble-free unit in general.

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