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wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Is it ok to use Dry graphite lube on suspension bushings?
Specifically this stuff,http://www.jigaloo.ca/lubricant/3-graphite-extreme.html
Mostly because thats what home depot has in stock right now. Canadian Tire is out of anything that might be similar.
Car is a 2009 Corolla with 156,000 Km and a bunch of squeaky bushings in the front end.

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wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Did Frozen Phil ever finish restoring that Mustang?
Last I recall, he had split from his wife, and it was being stored in a garage owned by the (former) in-laws.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

JUST MAKING CHILI posted:

What do I need besides my socket set and a box of new plugs to change sparkplugs on a 2010 Honda Civic? Do I need a torque wrench and gap gauge?

Anti-sieze compound for the plug threads.
Maybe a small piece of rubber hose to fit over the tops of the plugs to start threading them in to the holes, before you put the ratchet on them.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

totalnewbie posted:

This is wrong. Do not put anti-seize on spark plug threads (unless they're black).


Since when? Not trying to start poo poo, just wondering, I've always done that since forever. Especially in aluminum heads.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Immolat1on posted:

So I scratched the poo poo out of the side of my car while shoveling it out of a snow bank. I feel like a huge dumbass cause it looks like I really did some damage. There's a few pretty fuckin long scratches on the door. They don't seem too deep (definitely not down to the metal) but the scratches would be noticeable as soon as you got closer than a few feet. What's everything I can try to reduce how apparent they are short of sanding and repainting? Is it something a dealership could possibly treat?

I'm super pissed because I've managed to keep it pretty blemish free for awhile and now I've royally hosed it very quickly.

Go to the parts store and get some sort of "scratch remover". There should be several brands, turtle wax, meguiars, mothers etc. Check reviews first, but most of those products should work at buffing out the scratches. Mind you, it depends on how bad they are.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

It may have come from the dipstick. Did you check that?

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

E Equals MC Hammer posted:

As in I did not engage the dipstick correctly? Well alright I'll go check that.

Edit: Nope

Having thought about it a bit more, I *think* that there are some transmissions that have some sort of vent device on them.
The first thing that came to mind was GM RWD transmissions. Then I looked back at your post, and you have a GM truck. So yeah, could be from a vent or something.
Hope this helped.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Jomo posted:

I own an automatic 1988 Nissan Langley Model X, because it's a Super-Special-Maximum-JDM-Only-Unique-Model tracking down the correct parts for it can be a pain, especially as apparently 1988 was a change-over year for Nissan introducing new parts. Anyway, It ended up failing it's last inspection on a leaky master cylinder and was quoted several hundred dollars for a replacement, which was quite shocking, but not as shocking as going online and finding that all the stores are asking 500 pounds for a new TRW replacement. Same mechanic quoted me $350 for a rebuild; and that's not knowing if the cylinder is actually in a rebuildable state or not.

So I was in a bit of a bind, but, I found on Ebay the same part (I think) for $80 shipped. Same cylinder sizing and everything. Only issue is that it's a mirror copy due to RHD vs LHD, but I decided to buy it along with a brake pipe kit for bending some new connector lines to solve this issue.

Fast forward to this morning and after swapping it over, bending new pipes, bleeding the system and charging the battery because it had gone flat, the brake feel is quite spongy. It does brake but you have to push the pedal half-way to get solid performance, and that very gradual braking force you'd get in the first 1cm is now spread over the first half of the pedal instead. Soo... have I goofed the brake bleed? I've done it a few times before and never had this issue. Do I have the wrong brake booster for this model? I don't see why they'd change from LHD to RHD if it's the same cylinder. Do I have the wrong cylinder? This is what I got off Ebay and the one listed for my car is this Nabco one. Have I missed something else?




Also, why are there hundreds of different master cylinders in the first place? Would it be easier for all manufactures to just have standardized sizes depending on weight/tow-class?

A lot of people recommend bench bleeding a master cylinder first. Did you do that?
My brother changed the clutch master cyl on his 99 miata and I was pedal man when he was bleeding it. We kept getting air in that poo poo, or rather coming out of the slave cylinder until we bench bled it. After that, there were not really any more issues. Just bleed the air bubbles that got in while the M/Cyl was off.
As far as is it the wrong cyl because RHD vs LHD I have no idea.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

rear end posted:

My car pulls to the left on the highway if I let go of the steering wheel, and tread wear on my front left tire is uneven. To me that sounds like it's time for an alignment.

Once upon a time with a previous car, I got an alignment at a tire shop. They hosed the car's alignment really bad and they had to realign it 3 times. The alignment was even computer assisted. The car handled like poo poo.

That made me put off getting an alignment for a while. Anything I need to know to make sure that they don't gently caress it up? I'm assuming I should steer clear of tire shops?

If the tires are too worn out (normal wear) or if one of them is worn unevenly, it might be difficult to impossible to actually align it properly.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

PainterofCrap posted:

I'm ready to pull the soft line on the left front. It's not that old, but one of the hoses that was on this car when I bought it (in 2000) had busted the inner-most ply, so that pressurized brake fluid would cause the loose section to flap across the inner hose & block pressure to the wheel cylinder. Impossible to tell visually; I cut & peeled the hose open, later, and found it.

When that happened, it nearly yanked the wheel out of my hand. Drove straight home granny-style, in first, in dirty underwear.

I actually have a new set of hoses, it's about the last thing I haven't replaced (since '01)

and on discs. About $3200 because the knuckles & balljoints gotta be changed too...


Yeah; all brand-new hardware & I cleaned & lubed up the self-adjusters. A bitch, but still easier than Chrysler's weirdo rig.

And all four drums are true.

Thanks, guys. Will keep you posted.

Does it have a proportioning valve? Can it be adjusted if it does?

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

This is more of an alternative insanity question.

Is it possible to buy an hour meter that you can open up and turn AHEAD?
Got a machine with one thats got busted glass/lense/whatever. It doesn't seem to be working properly anymore. It still changes, but according to the meter, the machine was only running for an hour yesterday, when it was actually running for about 10 or so.

Its not a big deal, I could just replace it with a new one and make a note of the replacement in my files for the machine, but if its possible to turn a new one ahead to match, that'd be sweet.

This is not the one in question, but its pretty much the same.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Zero VGS posted:

I'm working on the battery pack for my electric truck:



My truck is jacked up on wood blocks, I have the battery pack on a Harbor Freight 1000-lbs motorcycle lift.

With the pack empty, I can just barely slide the whole thing under the truck with my own strength.

With the battery pack full, it weights 800 pounds, and our driveway is super cracked and crooked, hence I can't budge the thing at all.

I came up with an idea... maybe I can buy something like this C-channel steel bar from Home Depot, and lay them along the ground like "railroad rails": http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt...01217/204225748

I'm wondering if that would let me slide the pack in and out from the under the truck easily. I just need the wheels to follow a straight line and not get hitched on the land-mined driveway. Those C-channel things seem really expensive though, and short. Anyone know where I would look to get something longer/cheaper, or if there's something else more appropriate to slide an 800-pound coffin around on uneven terrain?

Is there a metal supermarket near you? They'll probably deliver you some C channel for free.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

melon cat posted:

I have a stupid question about a car noise. 2009 Hyundai Elantra GLS. Whenever I start up the car there's an ear-splitting squealing noise. So, I replaced both serpentine belts (it was overdue). But the squealing sound is still there. Observe (be warned- the squealing noise is loud)!

The noise happens when I start up the engine. And also when I change and move into the reverse gear. But when I'm cruising along, the sound goes away. When I replaced the belts, I tightened the tensioners so there's 1/4 inch of slack, which is what my Haynes manual recommended. But I also probably didn't do a very good job measuring the slack.

What could be causing this squealing? Maybe I need to tighten the belts some more?

Yeah, tighten that poo poo a bit more.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Javid posted:

Well, if I have to break them loose with the wrench first, I can use any old drill to automate the rest of the spinny work. Which works, and lets me use a beefier bit than the 1/4" socket adapter the impact would necessitate.

How about tightening them? Same deal with finishing them off manually? I was more concerned with over-cranking them into the aluminum wheels, so once breaking them loose is moot, not having enough torque to hurt anything is a feature, not a bug.

I've got the milwaukee 18 V and its not enough to break my nuts loose. It'll be good for not over tightening though. I crank my lugs down with it then use a torque wrench to finish them off. I've got a corded electric impact for nut removal.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

09 Corolla XRS 165,000 KM (~100,000 Miles).

I hear some pretty awful noises when hitting irregularities in the road. Similar, but not the same as when the rear struts were blown on my old Mazda. I've been told that just bouncing the car a few time at each corner and seeing how long it takes to stop is no longer a "satisfactory" way of telling that your shocks need replacing. For that matter, when I do it, it doesn't take that long anyway (maybe up and down once or twice after I let go of the car). Without actually taking the shocks out and apart from the springs, what other ways are there to tell?

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

After posting a page or two ago, about hearing a bunch of bad noises going over bumps, the opionion seems to be that I need new struts for my 09 Corolla.

I don't want to fool around with spring compressors so I'd rather get the pre-mounted strut/spring combos.
Looking at Rock auto, I see that they have them by a couple different companies. The economy line comes with FCS (never heard of them but that doesn't mean poo poo) struts and springs made by whoever the gently caress. I'm a bit confused though because they're shown under the economy heading, but each part listing says "premium". Anyone know what the deal is with that?

Also, they have listed under the original ride quality heading, Spring/strut combos made by Monroe. I've always heard that pretty much the only time people use Monroe stuff is solely for the purpose of putting the car up for sale the next week so that you can say in the ad that the car has brand new (whatever).

Are Monroes actually any good? What about the FCS stuff?

I don't care about high performance stuff right now, and don't plan on selling the car anytime soon, so I don't want to buy the cheapest poo poo only to have to replace them again in 2 years.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

I just picked up rear pads and rotors for my car from Rock auto. Raybestos.
I know Raybestos is a reputable brand, or seems to be. But I didn't notice anything on the box about warranty. What is the warranty like on their products?
The Pads are the EHT (enhanced hybrid Tecknologeeeeee) line. I don't care if these pads last forever, but I need them to last for a few years at least. Same with the rotors.

The rotors are plated, or coated or whatever, and the entire surface is coated. I guess thats probably normal since they likely just dip the whole rotor in whatever coating solution they use. Should I take a sheet of emery cloth to the friction surface before I install this poo poo, or just let the pads wear it off? I want to make the gently caress sure that I break these things in properly...

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

monsterzero posted:

If you look up the part on Rockauto there is a warranty link. It's probably 1-year, but you should check.

The friction surface was coated? I've never seen anything other than light oil on a rotor* and that just gets a quick blast of brake cleaner.
If it's something heavier like a lacquer, then I don't know.

*My last set of rear rotors with the parking brake in the hat were painted black on the hub and inside on the parking brake friction surface. It was kind of weird/surprising but since it was the parking brake I gave few fucks. I would drive around for a while with the parking brake dragging slightly, and not set it when I parked because the paint would cause the pads to stick. I would reapply the brake after everything had cooled. Got better after a couple of cycles of this.

Yeah, its an anti rust coating. It'd be easier for them to just coat the entire thing, than to mask off parts of it and only coat the hat etc. Come to think of it, I put coasted rotors on the front a year or two ago. I think I just started driving and the poo poo wore off after a few stops....

Thanks for the advice anyway. Never hurts to hear another opinion.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

kid sinister posted:


I don't suppose anyone has a list of where all the grease zerks are on a car?

Depends on the vehicle. Typically (but not limited to) Outer tie rods, ball joints (lower and upper if equipped) Various steering linkages besides tie rods, U Joints etc...

Some ball joints, and tie rods don't have them.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

I've been looking around for struts and springs for my car, 09 Corolla. By the end of the summer I'm hoping to have new struts and springs, plus all the associated doodads (strut mounts etc.), and install them shits in the fall.

Since I don't want to get the FCS (possibly stands for Fuckin Chinese poo poo?) quick struts, I'm going to get the KYB struts and associated bits, but I'm not sure about the springs. Since either brand isn't that expensive, should I get the Moog springs or AC Delco?

I know Moog makes ball joints, tie rods, U joints etc.. Anyone have experience with their springs? Any good?

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

monsterzero posted:

Do springs really go bad? Maybe they do if you head-butt them. I get doing a quick strut (because quick) but I don't think I've ever known anyone to replace spring unless they were lowering or sportifying the car.

Yeah, they can, plus my car sags a bit on the driver side. I don't necessarily have the stereotypical mountain dew drinking goon physique, but I could probably stand to lose about 25 pounds or so. Also, I kinda flop in to the car. A few years of doing that and well...... The driver side is a bit saggier than the passenger side.

Yu-Gi-Ho! posted:

It's usually quicker to swap the complete assembly. If you're paying a shop to do it, it often winds up being cheaper overall to swap each corner as an assembly. If you're doing it yourself, it's still easier to just swap the entire assembly. Safer too.

And with a lot of miles, springs will absolutely sag. My 95 Civic had camber issues because the original springs were sagging so bad, but I paid $200 for it with nearly 200k, so I didn't really give two shits so long as the toe could be set. My 06 Saturn definitely has worn springs as well; 175k on it, and the back end is sitting a lot lower than it used to.

I'd totally go for the quick struts, but I don't like the idea of getting the cheap assed quick struts that are available for it. I don't care about m4d s1ck handling and slamming that poo poo, I'm getting to be an old dude and stock ride height/quality would be perfectly acceptable for me. I can't seem to find the quick struts for all four corners, that come from a somewhat reputable brand.
My current outlook is that I'm going to have this car for a few more years. I'd like to buy something that'll be good for at least that. If I was going to sell it next week, I'd go with the cheap stuff.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Where the christ is the date code on a tire (obviously on the sidewall)? And how do you read that poo poo? I've looked and never seen anything resembling an actual date....

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

PainterofCrap posted:

You can't kill a Mopar Slant 6. At least: not easily.

Good god, I have a boner for inline sixes, and Slant sixes were the poo poo. Designed to be made from aluminum and built of Iron.
But yeah, Inherent balance, you would have to deliberately engineer an I6 to be unbalanced. The balance in itself really helps with reliability, Smooth engines don't shake themselves apart.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Bad Munki posted:

I'm about to inherit a 66 Datsun roadster that I need to ship from Seattle, WA to Des Moines, IA. Any specifically goon-recommended transport companies? I've never shipped a car before so I don't have much of a baseline here.

Is it drivable?

Get Dick guy to drive it to a field in Valentine Nebraska. Its only about 7 hours from Des Moines.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Vincent Van Goatse posted:

I tried Windex and there were still some streaky bits so I just gave the windshield a vigorous wiping with a paper towel. Seems to have done the trick. Thanks.

Newspaper..... Seriously.

I used to (still do) hate cleaning my windows, but Newspaper works dope. I spray with windex, use a blue shop paper towel and wipe the poo poo out of it, then another dry blue shop towel, followed by newspaper.

Works fuckin dope.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

I'm looking to pick up some suspension poo poo on Rock Auto. does anyone know if Strut mounts, bellows, Insulators etc come in pairs of individually?

I know the coil springs come in pairs, and are listed as coming in pairs. I suppose if the other parts came in pairs they would also be listed as that, but I want to make sure before I possibly order four of a bunch of stuff.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

EightBit posted:

That's not "some electrical issues", that's fully gremlin-laden madness.

Well, he did say "reliable for a volkswagen".

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

The parking brake mechanism in one of my rear calipers (09 Corolla) is sticking the cable moves fine. I just replaced the rear pads and rotors which is a piss off, I don't want to have to replace the pads again if possible. It did the same thing, but a bit worse, about a year ago, but at the time I didn't care, because the pads and rotors were old and close to being lovely. I've been looking at Rock Auto for calipers.

They're all reman calipers, which is fine, I just want to get the best one that I can get. I've been leaning towards the Raybestos calipers that are listed under the "Premium (OE Quality + Added Features)" since they come with pads, which would match the pads that I just put on there. The reason being, is that if this keeps happening, before I have a chance to change out the caliper, I won't have to get a whole new set of pads, just to change one side. I'd assume that the pads themselves might be glazed, or worn a lot more than the other (passenger) side.

I'm willing to entertain suggestions as to what other reman caliper brands are good.

My Choices are:

A-1 Cardone

Raybestos

Wagner

Beck/Arnley

Centric

AC Delco.

Prices range from about 70 bucks to 140 ish after the core rebate. Since we're not talking about thousands of dollars, I don't really give a poo poo if everyone tells me to buy the expensive as gently caress ones.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Put them in a freezer for an hour or two?

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

RE: the talk of locking up your brakes from a few pages back.

This is my opinion, feel free to call me a fuckwad or whatever.

ABS brakes can't beat proper threshold braking for stopping distances. Problem is how many people can actually do that? You take a driving school for a weekend and by the end of it you can do it properly, after trying it a hundred times in a row. But what about 6 months later when you haven't done it since? In your own car, not the one that you were driving at the driving school. You probably can't. The average person might be able, in a parking lot after a few tries, do it properly, but when you actually need to do it, like you're barreling down on a group of nuns crossing the street with a bunch of kittens and retarded kids in tow, can you actually do it in that panic/emergency situation? I doubt it. If you're an auto-xer or a guy that goes out to track days and whatnot, then you probably can, the rest of us, not likely, I sure as gently caress couldn't and I *might* be a slightly better than average driver.

I see ABS as a kind of catch all thing, not everyone can threshold brake properly, but everyone can ram the gently caress out of a brake pedal and pray for the best.

As far as locking up stops the best, but you lose steering control debate, I remember someone telling me years ago that when you lock them up, and you start wearing away at your tires, the little bits of rubber underneath the contact patch act like ..... "marbles" under your tires. Sort of like, giving them something to roll on even though the tire itself might not be rolling itself. I've noticed a similar effect in the winter and spring for example when they've laid down the little bits of gravel on the road. You hit the brakes, and my ABS will kick on sometimes, even when I haven't actually slammed the pedal down.

Anyway, thats just what I think, fire away.....

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Ethics_Gradient posted:

Aside from a big socket for the axel nut, a tie rod separator, and a few cotter pins for reinstallation, will I need any special tools or finesse if I'm removing the front hubs from a '96 Starlet? (Repair manual is unavailable, but according to sources it shares most of its suspension components with Tercels/Paseos of the same vintage.) While I'm in there I've got an outer CV boot to replace on one side. I've got a socket set, breaker bar, jack stands, and a torque wrench at home already.

To my surprise, the Automotive program at work can't actually work on cars anymore (, guess a kid hurt themselves or something), but I reckon if I can bring them the hubs, they can press the old wheel bearings out and fit it with new ones. Worst case, I can borrow the tools I need and at least save myself some labour charges at a shop. I have the bearings and CV boot already, and can leave the car up on jack stands for a few days if I need to.

Also, does anyone have suggestions for a car other than Corollas I could look for to scavenge wheels (in Australia)? It's a 4x100 stud pattern, looking for 37-39 offset. The wheels on it now are 13", according to Starlet forums it can go up to 15's without needing to modify any body panels*. Corollas seem to be my best bet as they're pretty common, but looking to expand my search net.

*But, how does one recalibrate a speedo?


edit: is a Dremel a good tool to buy for grinding off the occasional bolt and such? Considering getting one for other projects, and I know they're good for polishing metal with the right attachments, wondering about other usefulness. Any models to avoid?

Mazda 323/familia of similar vintage?

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

'09 Corolla, with rear discs. Driver's side rear caliper was changed last night. The parking brake mechanism was seizing up. I changed the caliper over, bled it, it took a while to get all the air out, but the line now seems to be air free. Pedal is good and firm.
Took it out for a test drive, did a bunch of gentle stops, hard stops, cool down time in between blah blah blah.

After the test drive, I checked out the rotor temps with a laser thermometer thingy. There was a difference of about 20*C between the passenger side and driver side. Driver side was the cooler of the two.
In my opinion, a difference of +/- 10* is probably fine but 20? Don't know, which is why I am asking the goon experts.

If the 20* difference is too much, it brings up two issues I can think of:

1. I didn't get all the air out of the caliper and thus its not clamping as hard as it should.

2. The caliper came with a new bracket and ummmmm "pad holding clips" and thus the driver's side pads were just sliding easier on the fresh lubricant and clean surfaces whereas the passenger side, though the pads were replaced and lubricated a few months ago, have had time to acquire dirt and poo poo.

What says you goony goons?

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

DogonCrook posted:

Where you just testing or were you doing a bed in procedure? The new pads arent gripping yet imo. Id give them some more miles and long solid pressure stops from speed.

Mostly just doing the same thing that I would do after changing pads and/or rotors, except this time it was the caliper I changed. Why I did that when the it was only the caliper I changed is anyone's guess, I just did it that way, just kinda because. The pads weren't new, though they are only a couple months old. I did sand off (hopefully only) a half mm or so from the pads, and scuffed up the rotor surface with some 80 grit when I had everything apart. The parking brake mechanism stuck on that side a few weeks ago, and got hot enough for me to be able to smell it afterwards, though I didn't drive *that far* with it. So I figured sanding would get rid of any glaze.

I haven't had a chance to look at them today, I've been too busy most of the time, and my temp reader is an hour away from where I am now. I might keep an eye on it for the next week or so.

As a side note, I noticed that the driver side front was quite a bit hotter than pass front at the same time I checked the rears, so I might bust in there and lube up the fronts, and if I do that I can';t see why I wouldn't go whole hog and do pass rear as well, that'll make it all four calipers greased recently, and maybe save me from doing it later in the fall when I might not have the time.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Hey sparkplug engineer goon. I can't find the posts, but you mentioned that if your plugs have shiny threads, then don't bother using anti-seize on them?
Only if they have non-shiny threads?

E: Nevermind, found posts.

wesleywillis fucked around with this message at 13:10 on Aug 21, 2017

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Myrmidongs posted:

I have a 2016 Subaru Impreza Hatchback with a 7" headunit (no navigation) that has recently decided to misbehave. The gracenote metadata that comes with radio streams is stuck on a few stations. For example, the last two weeks, one of my stations is stuck showing "Sublime - Smoke Two Joints" as the song playing. I followed some instructions, downloaded a USB update for the headunit and ran through that. The update was actually still the current version, and by the time all was said and done, it rebooted and I was still greeted with the same thing. Is there anything I can do other than talk to the dealer at this point?

Have you tried unhooking the battery?

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Javid posted:

Replaced in 2015. Over two years. I'll dig up the email and see.

E: nope, 1 year warranty.

Mostly I just wanna know if I got a bad cap (since the cap is like a month old) or if this is just poo poo that happens when you can't stop when the gauge spikes. (tldr I have been having cooling issues and was evading a road rager who was aggressively following me around town when that happened so parking wasn't an option)

At least someone had a rad in stock and was open late, just hope nothing else is hosed.

Likely a hose would have blown out first, or at least popped off the tube before that happened.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

Does penetrating oil harm rubber boots? Specifically those on my sway bar end links? Power steering bellows, or tires for that matter.

I know that some Penetrating oils have Perchlorethylene (perc) in them. That poo poo can gently caress up asphalt and stuff, which means probably other plastic/rubber parts as well.

I had my wheels off yesterday to put new brake pads in, and I still need to replace springs/struts etc on my car, and I notice that the sway bar endlinks attach directly to the struts, so I'd have to undo those and they currently look pretty grimey.
My plan was to spray them daily, or near daily for a week or so before I have to take them off and change out the struts.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

David Corbett posted:

I threw in an edit about rotors on the last page after discussion had moved on, so I'll just repost it here.

Are there any aftermarket rotor providers that've been generally recognized for making a superior product, or at the end of the day is a hunk of iron just a hunk of iron? Within reason, of course - I'd rather go with coated rotors than whatever the cheapest rotors I can find on the Internet is, because after all they're safety equipment. Unfortunately it's hard to find parts up here in Canada, because the GS350 was a pretty niche model to begin with and even more so up here.

I just got a set of rear rotors from Rock Auto. They are plated, or coated or whatever. Not cross drilled, slotted or whatever. You *should* be able to find coated rotors from somewhere local.

Just looking at the napa canada website, they sell them shits there.

Probably elsewhere too.

https://www.napaonline.com/en/searc...pplication=true

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

shy boy from chess club posted:

On the rear brakes you will need the tool to wind the piston back into the caliper when you push it back in. The parts store might have it to borrow.

https://www.napacanada.com/en/p/SER3163

They're cheap if you want to buy one too.

Make your life easy, What I did with mine is hook it up to a 3/8" drive extension, then a socket adapter, chucked that in a cordless drill, and on low speed, with the drill clutch loose, I used the drill to spin it in the appropriate direction. Took less than 30 seconds, just do it slowly, so that if the dust boot starts spinning too, you can stop before it gets torn. If necessary, you can pry the boot off the piston and put a tiny dab of brake lube in there to help the piston spin without the boot binding up.

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wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

A garden full of trees, and a pocket full of cheese.

MMD3 posted:

Two questions...

What's a reasonable price to expect to pay for a decent detailing job? I just bought a used Mazda CX-5 and want to get it cleaned up thoroughly at least once.

Does anybody have a trunk organizer they're happy to recommend? like one of those compartment bin things for throwing jumper cables etc in.

There was a deal on at a local place a while back and I got mine done for about 100$ CDN.
It didn't look superb when it was done, but it did look good. And it saved me from having to do it after the winter. For me it was worth it.

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