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IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





IF YOU ARE ASKING A QUESTION, YOU NEED TO GIVE DETAILS
Be specific. "MY BLUE CAR IS MAKING A SQUEAK WHAT COULD IT BE?" ain't good enough. Tell us the make / model / year / engine type when asking questions about your car. Beyond that, the experts will ask for further details.

The last two threads:
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=2012475
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=2341562

If you are asking about what car to buy, that's this thread.

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IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Seems to me that if it was a fuel supply issue, it should get worse under load / more throttle, not better - more throttle would just mean more lean.

To reiterate the first reply of the thread - don't just throw parts at it. Do plugs on it if they're due and you don't want to do it yourself, but don't expect that to necessarily solve this unless the ones that are in the car are really, really bad.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Why, are you looking to buy? I'm 99% certain my dad got his old C6 through Kerbeck and they were able to have it ordered and sent to a dealership here in AZ. Neither my old man nor the car ever went anywhere near NJ.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





I'll have to check with him but I don't think he paid anything other than a typical destination fee - Kerbeck ordered it from the factory but was able to set it up so that it never went to them to begin with.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





If nothing else is behaving badly (you aren't seeing low voltage out of the alternator, you aren't feeling weird power steering assist that cuts in and out) then the belt itself has probably just aged enough to start slipping. The other possibility is that the tensioner itself is failing and isn't holding the belt on as tightly as it should be. The belt just being old is more likely of the two.

In either case, it should be a very simple repair.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





tuyop posted:

My 2010 Mazda 3 Sport GS is making this terrible squealing metal-on-metal sound in the front driver side wheel well. I took a video. The brakes aren't being applied at all in the video, it's just rocking. It only does this when moving at low speed below 60kph, and it doesn't make any sound when stopped or revved. Steering makes no difference.

That sounds a lot like the noise my Mazdaspeed3 made when it managed to get a rock jammed between the backside of the rotor and the dust shield.

The Crystal Ship posted:

So, I'm new to living in the north. It recently got into the negatives and so my car is indicating that the tires need to be filled up. My question is should I actually do it? I don't want them to be over inflated once it warms back up. Please advise.

Assuming you fill them properly to the value listed on the doorjamb, unless your temperatures have a 60+ degree swing in the next week, you'll have lost enough pressure just through normal use that it won't be overinflated by the time it warms up. If you somehow had a 90 degree swing in temperatures tomorrow, aside from setting some sort of world record, you'd be overinflated by about 8 PSI which really isn't that hard to deal with using a tire gauge.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





totalnewbie posted:

Well, if you look at the drive shaft, it should be pretty obvious if it was actually partially sawed.

Seems like banging around on the ground might make that determination difficult, but at the same time... driveshafts on stock six-year-old trucks just don't fail like that

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Yeah, the only two V8s (that aren't the diesel) listed on Rockauto are both small-blocks and only differ internally. They both use PH5 (or equivalent) oil filters.

I find it strange that the 4.3 didn't use the same filter, even though it's based on the SBC as well.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Does anyone know of a mid-range gauge that shows two temperatures? I'd like to add at least a transmission temperature gauge to my WJ, and possibly engine oil as well, but I've really only got room for one 2-1/16" gauge. Digital is fine, but all I can find is really sketchy poo poo or really expensive poo poo.

I'm not even married to the idea of it being a 2-1/16" round gauge, I'd be fine with just a couple of rectangular LED displays. But if I can't find something less sketchy for a not-stupid price point, I'll probably just do the transmission temp and be done with it.

triple clutcher posted:

say I owned a truck with all-terrain tires. Assuming godawful upstate NY winters, would it be worth the money to get a set of snow tires for it as well?

Depends on the tire. I have no experience with awful winters anywhere, but the rebranded Kumho KL61s I have on my WJ have the "winter service symbol" on them. Discount sells them as the "Pathfinder". The one day trip I took up north while it snowed this winter, it handled the snow and slush perfectly. There was nothing like the "impending death" feeling I got the previous two times I've ever driven on snow on regular all-seasons or summer tires.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Plural of anecdote is not data and all, but I switched my WJ from dino oil (regular changes every 3k from new) to synthetic and have seen no leaks. The only oil getting anywhere it shouldn't seems to be an extremely small amount from the oil pressure sensor, and that was leaking before / has not increased since. It's literally just enough to leave a drop of oil hanging onto the oil filter; it doesn't ever drip onto the ground while parked.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





jonathan posted:

About to do a trans fluid swap and filter swap.

Can I pull the pan, pull filter, start engine and idle it in park till fluid stops pouring out of the cooler line,

Hook it back up, install pan, fill trans ?

All the poo poo I read says to replace it at 4L intervals, but I'm lazy.

Edit: to further explain, pumping out all the old fluid will allow a cleaner fluid overall since I'm not mixing old and new as I'm doing the "infusion" style. Secondly, I figure enough fluid residue will exist to not damage seals or clutches for the 30 seconds it takes to fully drain the remaining 5L of fluid in the converter etc.

That still seems like a long time to have the pump sucking air.

You're not going to get 100% of the fluid out on any given change; if you're really that concerned, do one change now and another in a few thousand miles.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Can you take a picture? It sounds like your cap fell apart.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





There's also the distinct possibility that, you know, the rotors / pads were just defective. Given that they apparently managed to put the wrong fuel tank in the car, some less-than-great rotor castings and pad materials is no surprise to me.

Jakcson posted:

When you mention "left foot brakers", are you talking about people that literally use their right foot on the gas, and their left foot on the brake?

Yes. There are people who don't realize that driving a gokart as a kid and left-foot braking there does not mean you should left-foot brake your real car.

Jakcson posted:

(How do they manage to get their driver's license if they can't figure out the basics?)

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Highbrow Slick posted:

The folks I've talked to over the phone at Honda say things like "this vehicle was built to comply with federal emissions standards, not California standards,"

Where was the car sold new? That's what will really impact this more than anything else. If it was sold in a non-CARB state and then moved to CA later on, I don't think the warranty magically extends.

For a reference point, Toyota gave my friend zero trouble when his Prius HV battery crapped out a month before the 8-year warranty (non-CARB state) ran out.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Figure out a way to make the engine run on Megasquirt, let the rest of the electronics fall apart around it.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Arriviste posted:

What is the sheet seal in a door interior called?

Vapor barrier is the most common name for it, I think. I've never managed to muck one up so bad that it couldn't be mostly jammmed back into place, but ultimately it is just some plastic sheeting. As long as it doesn't get in the way of anything I don't see what would be wrong with your proposed replacement.


GobiasIndustries posted:

Thanks for the code pages, that's definitely helpful! Looks like it's this one: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_High_Value_engine#LX9

As far as the P0128 - really, the only two things that can cause that are either a bad engine coolant temperature sensor, or a bad thermostat. Is it running like absolute poo poo and spitting fuel out of the exhaust? Then it's probably not the coolant temperature sensor, especially since the computer should also throw a code for that too. If you really want to be sure it's not the sensor, you'd need a scan tool that can show you the actual sensor values. Then you just park the car overnight so that it's stone cold, and check the readings on the coolant temperature sensor versus the intake air temperature sensor. Both should be about equal to each other, as well as roughly equal to the ambient temperature. If the coolant sensor is reading like -30 when it's 50 degrees out, the sensor is bad.

With that said... it's almost never the sensor, thermostats are just stupid lovely little things that like to fail. It looks like it's not too bad to get to, at least - some people just take it off, some people remove a couple of hoses right above it, and at least one person decided to just pull the headlight and go after it that way. The actual replacement is just removing a hose and a couple bolts, removing the old thermostat, installing the new one, and filling the whole mess back up with fresh coolant.


OSU_Matthew posted:

What's the best way to get the correct amount of current from the battery to the starter relay (bypassing the ignition switch)?

My gut reaction is that the switch may be wearing out / building up too much internal resistance, or some connection somewhere along the way has come loose. Is the switch actually rated for somewhere in the ballpark of 30A?

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





When it's acting up, put it in neutral and then depress / sidestep the clutch once or twice (letting it come up as fast as possible). If it immediately gets better you definitely have some air in the system, probably caused by a failure of one of the hydraulic components.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Astonishing Wang posted:

I want to get a vehicle as a donor for a project - but I want one that's already running. A lot of the stuff in my price range is pretty high miles, for example a '97 ford 7.5 liter v-8 with 200k on it. If I were to buy a truck like that and drive it around for a while to determine how the motor is, and then do a simple gasket job would that be a decent way to get a few reliable miles out of it? I'm thinking stuff like oil pan gasket, rear main seal, head gasket, intake/exhaust, etc. Probably the timing chain and water pump while it's out as well?

e: this one for example
http://sandiego.craigslist.org/csd/cto/4945296995.html

Or do I need to replace rings and other stupid bullshit?

I mean, you could go through and regasket everything, but unless it's pissing fluids I wouldn't see the benefit of it. Of the ones you mentioned, the head gasket and intake manifold gaskets are the only ones that can really fail in a way that will immediately and directly impact the engine's ability to run. The rest of them, the engine may make a mess, but as long as you can keep enough oil and water in it, the engine will still run the same.

I don't think big-block Fords are particularly prone to making GBS threads head gaskets unless you overheat the gently caress out of it anyway, like any other engine, and godawful intake manifold gaskets causing massive coolant / vacuum leaks are usually a GM thing. Unless it's pissing fluid everywhere, you'd see the best return-on-investment (both cost and time) from replacing worn out suspension and interior components.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





I've always understood it to be where collision is what pays you if you do damage to your own car (i.e. this scenario) and comprehensive covers you for situations where it wasn't your fault, but there's not necessarily another party to blame.

How do you figure the "adds $350 to my annual premium"? Are you reading your bill, because if so, that's not what making a claim would add to your premium - that's what you're paying for that coverage.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





1. Usually MRSP-$10k, since it lets them say a bigger number of discounts than Invoice-$x.

Headlights in a stupid-quick runthrough:

First, lens / reflector type is independent of bulb type. There are halogen projectors and HID projectors, and yes there are even (rare) HID reflectors.

The lens type does pretty much what it says on the name. Reflector-type bulbs use a shaped reflective surface to do much of the work to take the light from the bulb (which, in general, is leaving the bulb in all directions) to direct it forward in a pattern that's both more useful and meets local lighting regulations. The lens in front may also be shaped to help direct light where it needs to go, but in a lot of modern cars it's just there to be aerodynamic, clear, and protect the light. Relatively cheap to make, but larger and the cutoff at the top of the light pattern is usually not very sharp.

Projectors use a more accurately shaped glass lens to do this work. Properly designed, you can get full bulb brightness right up to a razor-sharp cutoff. They take up less surface area on the front of the car, but need more depth, and tend to be considerably more expensive.

Halogens are just high-powered incandescent bulbs. They still work by running electricity through a wire filament until it gets so hot that it glows. Simple, effective, and dirt cheap.

HIDs actually use an arc between two electrodes to produce their light. Because you can't do that on 12V, they also have a ballast setup that generates the voltage they need to operate.

Note that because the pattern of light emitted from the bulb varies based on the bulb type (HID vs Halogen), the bulb and housing need to be paired together. Installing HID bulbs into halogen projectors is just going to blind the gently caress out of oncoming traffic.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





BrokenKnucklez posted:

Pretty much. Unless you know its going to be slick, then pop it into 4HI before hand.

To add to this - it's a lot easier to get into 4HI/4LO when you aren't already up poo poo creek and scrambling for traction. No idea how the transfercase in that Suburban works but on the NV247 in my Grand Cherokee (and I think the NV242 works the same way) you need to be rolling slowly to shift from "4 All Time" to 4LO.

Of course, because I prefer to go very slowly when dragging my WJ over rocks, I pop it into 4LO for drat near anything.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





ColdPie posted:

Sanity check time. Replaced the rear calipers on our 02 Mustang last night. While we had the calipers off and were buying new ones, we just let the brake fluid drain into a bucket.

Did it drain the master cylinder too low? Might need to bleed it first before it works, or use a pressure or vacuum bleeder to get enough through.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





It's still better than the concentric slave / "hydraulic throwout bearing" a lot of cars use, where a slave failure means removing the loving transmission.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Are you getting a check engine light when this occurs? How far past midway is the temperature gauge going?

Is the engine's cooling fan running? Even with the engine cold, if you start it up and turn the A/C on, the fan should be cycling on and off every few seconds to keep air moving over the condenser.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





The fan is very loud, you should be able to hear it cycling on and off even if you have the doors and windows closed (I can on my '13 CR-V). You could always try to see if it's turning, but at least from what little time I've had to spend under the hood of my CR-V, it's buried in there a bit so it's actually quite difficult to see.

If the fan isn't running, you have no airflow over the radiator or the condenser until you move again, which will make the engine overheat and the A/C work like poo poo.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





some texas redneck posted:

The newest Honda I've owned was a 2001 though, so I'll leave IoC and others to guide you on that.

If it's not rotating the tires, changing the oil, or changing the battery, I've got nothing for you. It's been dead loving reliable and will hit 48k miles just before it hits two years old.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





some texas redneck posted:

But you can at least look at the relay box and see what does what. I can't.

(you've already had to replace the battery? )

Arizona heat murders them. I have literally never had a battery last longer than three years out here, and that was the trunk-mounted battery in my old NB Miata. I didn't let it get all the way to a no-start condition but it was cranking really slowly at the end. $80 at Costco and I'll probably never have to buy one again for it.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





trigonsareNOThomo posted:

Absolute best gas mileage small suv?

Depends on your definition of "SUV" and "small".

SperginMcBadposter posted:

I want to try buying and mounting my own tires, but the wheels are non-OEM and I don't know their dimensions.

These are the tires+wheels that have been on it since I bought the car. What tire sizes should I be able to fit on those wheels?

PS: on a scale of 1 to "you're already blownout", how hard is it to mount your own tires?

First off - tire size is given as:

PXXX/YYRZZ

Where 'XXX is the section with in millimeters, 'YY' is the sidewall height defined as a percentage of section width, and 'ZZ' is the wheel diameter... in inches. Yes, it's stupid as gently caress.

Wheel diameter is the most important measure (you can't fudge on that at all) and those are 15" tires, so it's safe to say those are 15" wheels. Width can be fudged within reason, though the 195mm tires you have on there now seem to be fairly appropriate for whatever width the wheel actually is. Usually if you remove the wheel there will be "15x7" or something like it stamped / cast on the inside somewhere. Sidewall height (the '60' in your current tires) helps define the overall diameter of the tire, and you want to keep it as close to the factory size as possible for the sake of keeping your speedo and odometer calibrated. Because this is a percentage of width, if you go up 20mm in width, you may need to drop from a 60-series to a 55- or 50-series tire.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





This thing?



Yeah, no, that seems like it's going to be absolute poo poo to get a proper balance job done on. Tires are one of those things that to do right, requires a huge amount of money in tools. I'd bet that the money I spend to get every set of tires that I ever buy in my entire life won't add up to what it costs to get a proper road-force balancing rig.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Raluek posted:

Sure, but where in a sequential gearbox do they use a screw drive?

I would chalk that up to whatever language it's being translated from having a word that can be used for either 'gear' or 'screw' and the latter being the more common usage.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





The rear end Stooge posted:

A little over three weeks ago, I bought a 2005 Civic sedan with 60k miles. The guy I bought it from couldn't tell me whether the timing belt had ever been replaced, so I decided to get it done immediately just in case. A day or two after I picked the car up from the shop, the belt started squealing quite a bit. I took it back and they said it was probably just the new belt stretching a bit, which is normal. They tightened it up and sent me on my way, and I didn't hear anything else until this morning, about two weeks later, when it started squealing again. It was pouring down rain this morning and I'm certain some water got splashed up into the engine compartment; if some got on the belt, could that cause the squealing? If not, and this is something I need to worry about, I guess I'll take it back to the shop and have them look at it again, but I'm not sure how long I should consider them on the hook for anything belt-related.

Your car has at least two belts - the timing belt and the accessory belt(s). The timing belt can't slip - it's a toothed belt and slipping would mean the same type of damage to your engine as if the belt had failed altogether. The squealing you're hearing is the accessory belt, and yes they can do that when they get wet. Did they replace that too when they did the timing belt? If not, it's probably old and hard and needs to be replaced. If yes, the tensioner might be failing.

coronaball posted:

Im text to speech posting so bear with me for any weird typos. Came back to car this morning. Still wouldn't start from park. I was sitting there bored waiting for the tow truck, so high put it in neutral, and it started right up. so now I don't know what the f*** is going on. some kind of ignition problem?

Your car has a switch somewhere on it attached to the shifter linkage, that will only let the starter work if the transmission is in park or neutral. Given the intermittent nature of the problem so far I wouldn't say 100% that this is the problem, but it's quite likely. Next time it won't start in park, try starting it in neutral again. If it fires right up again that time, then you definitely need your neutral safety switch to be replaced.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





That looks like a standard flare-nut style fitting to me - there should be a nut on the end of the hardline that you will tighten into the end of that hose.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





If it were a tooth off, you'd be a lot further than 5 degrees off since the distributor gear does not have anywhere near 72 teeth on it.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Leperflesh posted:

Yeah, the distributor shaft is keyed, you can't put it in any teeth off (which also made it a big pain in the rear end to reinstall, it took me ages to get it oriented exactly right so that it would slot in flush). It's fine, I just need to rotate the cap another 2.5 degrees. Doing this without a timing light was always going to be not super accurate. The main thing is, it looks like the smoking issue isn't entirely due to the timing being wrong.

I spoke to my mechanic yesterday. He made a similar suggestion about thicker oil. He said he usually uses 5w30, so that's what's in the truck now; a higher viscosity will help reduce oil intrusion into the combustion chambers. There are special "high mileage engine" branded synthetics, so I'm thinking of doing a change and putting that stuff in. Plus, get the timing exactly right, and then as you said, drive the truck on the freeway for a bit, get it good and hot. The mechanic also mentioned that blue smoke could potentially be a leaking PCV valve?

It's only keyed to the oil pump so it is possible to get it off if the pump gets turned, but again if you were trying to do that you'd be off by a hell of a lot, not just a few degrees.

I would skip on any actual synthetics in an engine that old / that may have blowby, but I would probably try some of the high-mileage dino oil (like Pennzoil's stuff that's maybe $2 more than the yellow bottle, but cheaper than Ultra) or maybe just go right to 15w40 Rotella / Delo 400. Those oils kept my old 350 running even though it had enough blowby to pop the dipstick out, and was constantly spraying the valvecovers from both breathers.


rocket_350 posted:

I have a 2009 Malibu with the 2.4 L 4cyl and six speed automatic. It has 120000 kms (75000 miles) on it. My driving is about 90% steady speed highway driving.

The owner's manual claims the transmission fluid never needs to be changed unless the car sees severe service. I'm not sure I buy that and am thinking of having a fluid change done. Should I? Can I expect an independent mechanic to have the information they need to do it properly, or would it be better to take it to a dealer?

Also, how much should trust the oil life monitoring system? It's indicating very long oil change intervals. I have been changing it when it reaches 50% and using a synthetic oil.

The transmission fluid change on that is probably no different than any other GM vehicle (remove pan, replace filter, replace pan, fill it up with enough Dexron). It probably requires Dexron VI, but that's pretty much ubiquitous at this point. I think you'd have to try to find some old Dexron III somewhere. And yes, "lifetime" fluids usually mean "until the transmission burns up from lack of fluid changes", so I would definitely change it at some point.

The oil life monitoring, on the other hand, is usually reasonably accurate on modern cars. Highway driving is very easy on engine oil since it means you always get it good and hot. How long is "very long"? If you really doubt it, take a sample from your next change and send it to Blackstone. I'd expect they tell you it's safe to run a good while longer.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





rocket_350 posted:

I've never let it count all the way down, it would probably be over 10000 miles if I did.

This is oil after ~8300 miles, on the second change ever in my CR-V, and still using the factory filter (Honda only recommends changing the filter every other time).



Any properly sealed engine with good oil that isn't getting beaten on all the time, should be able to run 8-10k oil change intervals.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





EightBit posted:

The oil that gets into your cylinder isn't what prevents wear, it's the amount that gets splashed on the back of the piston, which will be reduced with a higher viscosity oil.

It's a 220k-mile GM V6 that's already burning oil. Any minor change in internal engine wear due to running a thicker oil is not going to be what does that engine in.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Somewhere i the range of single or low-double digits. The only new car I've ever bought had a total of eight miles on it.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





ilkhan posted:

Get a bigger discount and a few oil changes, then don't worry about it.

Buying off a lot you get however many miles on are on it at the time. If you want 0 miles, order from the factory and watch it roll off the truck. They always have a few miles on them from the factory, regardless.

Yeah, every car is going to have some delivery mileage from QA testing / driving off the end of the line / whatever driving is needed as part of PDI. But there's still a huge difference between "under 10 miles" and "it's on the third tank of gas already" when you're buying an actual new car.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





I'd do that deal.

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IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





VelociBacon posted:

If it's not an original engine it's just worth a lot less. It would be expected to run just as well, it's just a collector thing.

Depends on what the original engine was, to be fair. If it was some rare / desirable RPO code like an LS5 or LS6 big block, or LT1 smallblock (did those ever end up in A-bodies?) then yeah, you'd want originality for maximum $. But if the original was just another 307 / 327 / 350 making under 300hp SAE gross, or an inline six, nobody is going to care that much if the engine has been swapped for something else.

It looks like Chevelles of that era were not given the easy option of a printed and firmly affixed sticker with RPO codes on it like my C10, but if you're supremely lucky the build sheet might still be jammed in a seat / under some carpet / somewhere else hidden. It'd look like this:

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