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StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


In my wifes 2011 Ford Escape V6, on Saturday we went across town, about an hour long drive and everything was fine. The weather was cold and snowing here in Denver, really quite a bit of snow. We hung out at our destination for a few hours. On the way back, the car was real foggy and the defrosters were only about halfway effective. At the time I chalked it up to bringing a lot of moisture into the car by getting in and out, having snow all over our boots. I don't recall it smelling bad at the time.

Today she called and said it was still getting real foggy in there just the same. She said it smelled bad but thought it was more like exhaust smelling. It has Motorcraft Orange in there I believe, so I'm not sure if that has the same smell as the green stuff I'm used to.

So my thought is a leak in the heater core (ugh), I'll check for moisture in the passenger foot well and for a low level of coolant in the reservoir. Is there any other likely diagnoses for this symptom? I'm asking simply because it's a MY 2011 car, with around 26,000 miles, and garage kept. I can't think of much reason for failure other than a defect in the core. The car spent nearly three years with extremely light use, about 1600 miles, and then has been driven by her for the last year for regular commuting. Cursory searches don't come up with this being common, but not unheard of either.

The only reason I'm asking this stupid question is to save us some effort diagnosing this issue, and make sure I'm not blinded by my preconceived diagnoses that I miss something simple that can be fixed in a parking lot.

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StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


BrokenKnucklez posted:

Sounds like a heater core failing if its fogging up the inside, the only other thing I can think of with a temp gauge not moving much and low heat output is a thermostat. But if it smells, start with checking for coolant loss.

Well I drove down there and looked at it. No leaks or drips on the floor, all of the plastic around the air boxes was completely clean like it had been detailed even. The level of coolant was down a very slight amount from the cold fill line but I have no reference to what it was last week.

So I started it up, it smelled sweet, and using the defroster fogged the windows up nearly immediately, and the glass was oily feeling. It's at the shop now, I saw where the coolant enters the firewall and there is no way I'm touching that. It's like 8" from where the hood meets the cowl, very high up and centered. That would mean taking off everything, and I'm not about to deal with that. Not on a Tuesday.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


BrokenKnucklez posted:

Yeah, I just looked it up... it claims 6 hours book time. But holy gently caress id rather stick needles in my dick that disassemble the dash.

I was quoted 7 hours. It's expensive, but that's what my savings account is for. I'm not dealing with the dash, I'm not dealing with the extra coolant, I'm not going to learn how an Escape is built. None of it sounded fun. Easily justified since the vehicle presumably has a long life left, and is otherwise in good shape and worth money, and I have an interest free loan that's above water.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


nitrogen posted:

ok, what the hell is this button for?



in before "fart fan"

Engine break button. Lets the smoke out of your engine.

(Opens a valve on the compression stroke to avoid compression, slowing the motor on a diesel).

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


1972 IH Pickup, daydreaming about future modifications.

Thinking about adding a second battery for winch applications, probably for a portable winch that I can put in the bed, under the front bumper, rear hitch or mount in a trailer. Regardless of all of that, I'm unsure of how to wire it. I read some guides that show them wired in parallel and some that say you need an isolator to avoid damaging a battery. I don't understand the reasoning for the isolator, basically. What's the right way to do this?

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


PaintVagrant posted:

Wasps like ham, eh?

God I hope not.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


I received my oil report on the International, with the 345ci V8. The lead and iron were high in this, and they suggested possible bearing wear. I'm not sure if there is a problem or if there was a problem. I'm not familiar with that failure, and thought that was mostly due to running without oil.

I changed the oil last about a year ago, I've been driving it weekly, but mostly short trips. I noticed a month ago the oil was low, at the base of the dipstick. I ran Delo 15w-40 that whole time, in Colorado. And of course it's got a carburetor tuned by an amateur, but the idle speed is good and timing is by the book.

Do any of those things alone or in concert lead to bearing wear? I figure if there's an operator error I should figure that out before the next sample to isolate it.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


heat posted:

The other day I changed the manual transmission fluid in my 01 Integra. When I removed the fill plug, about a quart of oil came squirting out (all over the goddamn floor because why would I have a pan ready under the fill plug?). Short of turning the entire car on its side, how on earth could so much extra oil get in there? Could it have absorbed water from the air?

That said it shifts a hell of a lot smoother now, Redline MTL represent

It may have been filled from a higher point, like a dipstick tube.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


zbn posted:

I heard a clunking noise when going over bumps in my VW Fox, turns out my muffler is bouncing up and down because the thing that was holding it up has come loose (why? rust? lovely welding?).

http://imgur.com/a1g63P2
http://imgur.com/FTI8Oy4

What's the damage here - does this just need rewelding, or do I need a replacement part, or replacement muffler?

You could probably weld it in the amount of time it takes to get a welder ready. Of course, if the hanger rusted enough to come off perhaps the muffler isn't long for this world and you may have it replaced anyway.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Leperflesh posted:

With a little research: looks like the distributor rotates clockwise, as seen from above. I think this means to advance the timing 22 degrees, I need to rotate the distributor cap counter-clockwise (that is, make the spark fire 22 degrees earlier in the cycle, so move the #1 contact "backwards" in the cycle). Yeah?

Each adjustment requires me to disconnect some stuff, so it's very difficult to make a lot of fine adjustments and start the truck in between each one. Well, not difficult, but time consuming.

e. I wonder where my protractor is.

The distributor rotates at half speed, since you only need a spark on every other revolution of the motor. You'll need to rotate it only about 10 degrees which would get you closer to zero. If you have a 90' angle, cut/fold that in half and you've got 45, you can cut that in half and get 22.5. Cut that in half again and there's your angle, 11.25' or so.

Here's the video you probably need to find the timing marks. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e74qmYkFMGc

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Leperflesh posted:

OK, thanks. Makes sense, now I think about it... to retard, move the contacts further along the circle so the spark happens later in the spin. Yup.

My dad has a strobe, but he's 50 miles away and I need to get this smogged in the next two days to avoid a late registration penalty. Because I left this to the last drat minute, of course. I figure if I get within a degree or two, it'll at least pass smog, and I can fine-adjust it next time my dad comes around.


UPDATE:
I had to unplug one of the two plugs on the distributor cap, and then pry a fuel line away a couple mm in order to cram the plug back in wedged against it, but that allowed me to position the cap exactly where it's supposed to be. And my god the idle is perfect, smooth as buttered silk. Thanks dudes. I'mma get it re-smogged this afternoon hopefully.

Oh man I was following with baited breath. I was curious how you were sure which direction to spin it, despite being able to figure it out I've generally just given it a spin and (using a light) determined if that was right or wrong.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Why is he taking it off so often? Would it be easier to buy a tailgate with the cutout for his gooseneck or 5th wheel hitch I'm assuming he has?

loinburger posted:

My parents recently bought a Dodge Ram 3500 pickup truck and are having problems with removing / putting on the tailgate. Currently, my dad is in charge of manhandling the tailgate, and my mom is in charge of maneuvering the left hand side of the tailgate to (un)set the pin. She really sucks at this and often gets her fingers pinched. My dad is trying to figure out a way to turn this into a 1-man operation - he's not able to both manhandle the tailgate and do fine maneuvering on it, so he's looking for some mechanical way to offload the manhandling part. There's generally only one location (their home) where he'd need to do this alone, so the solution doesn't need to be portable. He's thinking of trying to rig up some sort of pulley system to the roof of the garage so that he can lower down / raise up the tailgate and (un)set the pin on his own.

Does anybody have any experience with removing / putting on a pickup truck's tailgate as a one-man operation, e.g. any DIY or commercial device that would help out? My dad is 59, so him getting stronger / more athletic isn't really an option.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


loinburger posted:

Thanks, I'll let him know that somebody else had luck with a pulley system - I was concerned that he'd spend a bunch of time setting it up only to have it not work.

If I had that problem and wanted to eliminate lifting and assuming I had the cash to buy a one ton pickup new, I would hang one of these up on my garage http://m.northerntool.com/products/...t_120327_120327 put a choker strap on the tailgate and buy two furniture dollies. Ta da, no more lifting. The remote would be especially nice to guide it onto one side. I don't know what to do without an overhead support though.

If he's cheap and doesn't see the value in having a 440lb hoist permanently installed in the garage, then use pulleys I guess, like these. http://m.northerntool.com/products/...uct_11839_11839

You really just need to pick up the tailgate from the center so it can pivot and go onto the peg. Mama can guide it while pops tugs the rope.

StormDrain fucked around with this message at 01:25 on May 1, 2015

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


ChewedFood posted:

So I've been working on this Mazda Protege5 that I got off of a guy at work for $400 with a blown head gasket. Figured I could flip it for a profit over the weekend. Oil in the coolant, head warped, valves eroded, all standard stuff. Had the head machined, new valves, seals, gaskets, radiator, timing covers because I broke them, went to start it last night and it won't. I lapped the valves in, good contact with seats in a full unbroken circle. When I put the springs on, I noticed three exhaust valves weren't a perfect fit. I was drinking and it was early morning after twelve hours of work and I made the poor decision to run with those old seats figuring it would still run with two cylinders making low compression. Hindsight is 20/20 right?

Now I'm pretty sure I timed it wrong. Starter fluid in the intake, blew off the intake cover. Timed it for #4 tdc thinking it was #1, I think. It's got fuel and spark. Compression is questionable. I'm correct in thinking that intake valves 90 from opening and exhaust valves 270 from opening is tdc, right? If so, I need to re time it for #1 cylinder which is the starboard most cylinder, right? Haynes is no help in figuring this out. Also Haynes says that you should time it 6 to 18 degrees advanced. There is no distributor, they don't mean mechanically, right?

Before I get hell for being lazy:

I know that I should take the head back off and get new seats to go with the new valves but first I wanna see how it runs with poo poo compression. Besides, it will be a week before another gasket kit gets here.

So the one time I had to set the firing order from scratch I put a wadded up plastic bag in the open spark plug hole for the right cylinder and bumped the starter until it popped out.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


SouthShoreSamurai posted:

Quick question about my rear view mirror. The mirror has popped off a couple of times, and car vibrations tend to start the dislodge process. The button that's attached to the window is stuck on tight, it's the spring (?) part that slides over it that doesn't hold it completely fast anymore. Is there some kind of glue that will work for this? Searching for mirror replacement glue only brings up the glue for the button itself. Or am I stuck buying a new mirror assembly and sliding it onto the button...

Usually there's a little set screw on those (usually as in every one I've ever cared to look at). The screw will bite into the mount a little bit and hold it tight enough until your constant repeats of Under the Influence by The Chemical Brothers on the sub in the trunk shake it free again in 6-9 months.

Unless you have a blue car, they have special mirrors.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Godholio posted:

Apparently they're all being drawn to you...I haven't seen one in years. They also didn't sell well, they were literally Oldsmobile's last gasp.

The old Alero, I see them often but it's the lingering GTA effect since my wife had one from 2002 to 2013. I also see a lot of the Grand Ams from that period, which are the same except for sheet metal and plastic. They're not special in any way that I can tell. Ours had electrical problems with the turn signals that we had fixed and a fuel pump died at 150k, but nothing major, it didn't burn oil and shifted fine. Fuel economy wasn't great at 22 in the city for a 4cyl. It was formerly a rental and it still ran fine to 160k mi before it slid into another car on ice.

They sold nearly 700,000 Aleros.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Geoj posted:

Do you mean calipers/drums? You really shouldn't paint the hubs...

Lately I've taken to using spray-on bedliner out of a rattle can. Flat black and much more resilient than most paint.

I used bbq paint. If I were to do it again, I'd use a lot of bbq paint.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Augmented Dickey posted:

We recently replaced the front drivers side tire on our Volvo (the store only had one in stock and we don't have a spare). The car started pulling to the left, so I had the new tire rotated to the back.

Now it pulls hard to the right (I have to keep the steering wheel ~10 degrees to the left to keep the car straight at highway speeds). Is this probably something caused by having an old and new tire on the same axle?

Get a matching tire to put on the other side, or three if it's awd. That bigger tire is rotating slower than the others and loving with the traction control and adding wear to your differential or transaxle. I'm probably only 80% on the effects but 100% on the solution.

My theory is traction control is braking the other three wheels and pulling you right. When it was on the front it was doing the same but you were applying power on the new tire and pulled it left.

StormDrain fucked around with this message at 16:18 on Jun 19, 2015

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Augmented Dickey posted:

I did some measuring this morning:

Front axle- left tire has ~.75mm more tread than the right tire
Rear axle- left tire has ~2mm more tread than the right tire

So hopefully replacing the rear right tire will mostly solve the issue.

Ok, so for fun, I used a little caclulator to illustrate the difference. Assuming a perfect nominal new tire, and that you run a 235/45R17, the worn tire is now a 235/44.1R17.



So don't do that.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Friar Zucchini posted:

What are AI's general thoughts on LED replacement bulbs? Most important is I want brighter brake lights on my Suburban since red lights on a red truck don't stand out as much in the daytime. Looking at these in particular, in red of course. I'm toying with the idea of swapping out all lighting on both my cars with LEDs, but I'll keep the turn signals stock since I don't wanna have to complicate things with resistors to keep the turn signals from hyperflashing, and I prefer the softer on/off effect of incandescent lights for flashing turn signals anyway. Also I know of AI's opinion of HID replacements for halogen headlights, and I'm guessing that applies to LEDs as well so I'm leaving them stock.

Those bulbs suck. They don't emit a wide pattern of light and you end up with this tiny red dot. Those are expensive for a bulb so perhaps they're a little brighter but you won't look like a modern car or LED lights. You're better off with something like this: http://www.xtralights.com/00-06chev...tu_QhoCaUXw_wcB but it's expensive!

You can eliminate hyperflashing of the signals by going to an electronic flasher, not really much effort in that.

If you're really crafty you can get some LED universal Stop/Turn/Tail lights and disassemble them and set them inside of your current housings, but it's still not cheap and you have to find the right ones that can be taken apart. I tried and failed when the model I bought was set in resin.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


22 Eargesplitten posted:

Am I right in thinking cars generally get better mileage at lower elevations? I'm thinking more oxygen, more complete combustion, more power for the fuel, further distance for a given amount of fuel. Assuming you don't have it tuned specifically for high elevation.


Ultimately it's probably a wash. A car in Denver takes less gasoline per cycle at a constant throttle position due to the air density, but as a reaction the driver opens the throttle further than they would at sea level, allowing more air in the motor, in order to wring more power out of the car, and more gas is used.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Friar Zucchini posted:

I was looking at the ones I mentioned because they do put out a wide pattern of light. I know the narrow beam ones you're talking about and I'm staying away from those since they don't have side-facing LEDs to light up the reflector. As far as light output, I'm seeing standard 3157 bulbs as putting out 402 lumens, and that one is the brightest one that seller offers, rated at 550. I've seen the ones you listed before and I like them but I prefer a stock appearance, definitely not going for styling or a modern LED appearance - those are more expensive and all I want is more light, or at least faster illumination. I just wedged a bottle onto the brake pedal and took a look at the lights and they do leave something to be desired.

edit: I'd thought I'd test the brake lights out to see if the LEDs last and if they held up for a couple months then I'd finish off both cars with them, but on second thought it might be a better idea to try something less crucially important than brake lights. I may have the one single GMT800 in existence with both DRLs fully functional, which is nice, but they're not super important, so I might use those for my LED test. They technically use a different bulb, but the same one above still fits.

Maybe just go for one brake light then - there's still the CHMSL and the other one if they go bad, and check it every time you're at a storefront in the reflection. I hear what you're saying though, the aftermarket housings are on the tacky end of the spectrum, the clear and chrome ones especially, smoked less so, red being the best in my mind, and they're expensive. Just at least go into it gently and only spend $30 instead of buying a full set.

My experience was a multi-faceted bulb like yours but shorter, in stock housings. They illuminated as well as the incandescent bulbs they replaced with the side effect of being pink since I didn't get colored bulbs, and giving a weird light pattern with hot spots. I replaced them all with a universal side marker cut down to fit the stock housing and it was a very dramatic difference. Look at the light they throw on the ground on the logs and shed on the right, the incandescent bulbs didn't do that.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Slavvy posted:

Haha what? This is hilariously untrue. Most modern engines are designed to run 95RON+ (adjust rating accordingly for baffling american ratings). They can run lower octanes thanks to the magic of knock sensors (indeed, you could run practically anything and it wouldn't hurt the engine) but with power and economy penalties; I've lost track of the number of people showing up at my work complaining about pinging because the nice salesman told them their 11:1 CR dual VVTI car will be fine on 91.

You lost track that the question was about cars at altitude. Denver is at about 1600 meters above sea level, less dense air won't compress as far and a higher octane is not required to avoid detonation from compression. At sea level you get one kg per square cm, in Denver it drops to 0.85. Your 11:1 motor is down to 9.5:1, and the lower premium you find here is fine.

It's all normalized that low mid and high grade across America is the same despite having a different number.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Parts Kit posted:

Here's a stupid question: what's a good way to remove thoroughly melted trash bags from a pickup bed? At least I think that's what's there. poo poo's been there since some time before I bought it and the needle scaler I tried today didn't do much. It was pretty brittle in the winter but not in the summer heat today, hopefully I don't have to wait until winter to not drive myself nuts removing the poo poo.

Also I'm repainting when I'm done so paint damage is not a concern here.

Have you applied a heat gun? Might soften it up and hey good excuse to get a heat gun.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


HaB posted:

I didn't own the car until after the rebuild, but it's done it since I owned it. It used to only do it when the engine was cold, but was fine after it warmed up.

Every other site I have been doing research on says to make sure all the electrical is straight before messing with the fuel stuff. So I will at least check the ignition coil with a multimeter. It seems a faulty coil can act a lot like fuel problems.

The thing is, ignition problems would be bad at any engine speed.

If this has been getting worse I'm inclined to say dirt is the root cause, and location being the question. I would pop the carb off and give it an inspection, taking off one fuel bowl and checking for dirt. If that was clean, I'd put it back together and move on since that's probably not the issue.

My thinking here is the engine when at high vacuum is only pulling through the idle circuits, something jammed in there would be starving you, which leads to stalling at cold temperature when you need more gas, and as those passages filled with more you eventually got so little gas you can't run hot. When you goose it you're drawing from the main circuits, the power valve opens, and you get more fuel through the jets and run better.

I don't know if adjusting the idle air mix screws would help or not for the hypothesis above, restricted flow at a low setting should still be restricted, unless the obstruction is right at the screws.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


A second reason I lean towards dirt in the fuel is the age of the car, and not knowing if the fuel tank was cleaned during the engine restoration. If my hypothesis earlier is correct, get a clear filter so you can visually inspect the gas for particles.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


HaB posted:

The people describing similar problems, including the dude I ran into this weekend all said it was fine once you gave it gas, even when it was the coil. Of the other 5 or so posts I saw, 2 were the coil, 2 were vacuum problems, and 1 was never updated with the outcome.

The tank looks brand spanking new to me, as do all the lines. I don't have a complete list of everything the guy before me did, but as far as what looks new: engine rebuild, tank, brakes/lines, etc. Was told it was basically everything save body/interior.

Not sure a clear filter is an option. The filter isn't inline - it's on the front of the carb itself. But I can pull the carb this weekend and take a look at it.

Well if that's all true I am probably wrong. You could put another filter ahead of the carb whoever a short rubber section is located, probably after the hardline from the frame rail before the fuel pump assuming a mechanical fuel pump on the motor.

I don't understand why the coil would be more effective at speed than slow, I'd be interested to learn too.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


HaB posted:

Ah okay. Where does one clip that gadget? ELI5


AI Stupid Question Thread - Brake Fluid is Sooo Cheap Compared to Death

Same place the tach is hooked to, there are good directions in the box. I have that same model and although I rarely use it I'm glad I have it.

His idle speed sounds low but probably right. Check the manual if you have it. My international has a 1/4" thick manual that is far more useful than any modern glove box manual. Idle speed is listed there.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Subjunctivitis posted:

TIRES

I need tire recommendations. I have a Ford Econoline E-250 V8 5.8l and need something that is great on highway and wet conditions, while also being able to load the van up and also be able to take it on off-road trails sometimes (I'm not mountain climbing or mud-running like a 4x4). I also want to avoid as much MPG loss as possible.

I'm looking at either:
Michelin LTX A/T 2
BFGoodrich Rugged Terrain T/A

These seem to be the best combo for highway and off-road needs. Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventures seem pretty nice as well, but I think they're probably too much of an A/T tire.

Are either one of these better for my needs or something else?

I've looked at 4Runner, Tacoma, and Jeep forums, but those are guys mostly concerned with aggressive tread while car forums, well, don't really care about any off-road stuff.

Just get a regular highway tire. If you're driving the occasional dirt road you're fine. Think long and hard about the number of times you've been traction limited.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Wicaeed posted:

I'm thinking about buying a new car, but have started doing some research first.

Are there any websites out there that give a clue as to what dealer invoice is on various brands?

Coatcos auto program seems pretty good at this. I know there are others though, can't think of any.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Senior Funkenstien posted:

Took the hub off the wheel i replaced the cylinder in and the parking adjuster, the spring for the bottom of the shoes and the bracket that has the ebrake wire and spring connected to it fell out.... WTF?

If the spring wasn't broke, not an attachment point, then it likely wasn't seated right and popped off, letting the adjuster fall out. Also, did you take the time to adjust it before you drove? Usually they're tight enough in there they can't fall out even without the spring.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Shadow225 posted:

Vehicle: 2003 Chevy Malibu Standard

Problem: There's no rhyme or reason that I can discern for this, but my turn signals will stop working randomly. When they stop working, neither the lights themselves nor the indicators on the dash light up. Sometimes they don't work for days at a time, sometimes it's just 10 minutes, and sometimes they will just quit while waiting for a green light. I've taken it into Firestone a few times, but the signals conveniently work when the techs get their hands on it. I could get an electric diagnosis, but there's no guarantee that it will turn up anything.

My buddy thinks that it's either a bad ground or a malfunction with the actual handle. He hates electric work, so he doesn't want to dig through the dash on a wild goose chase. Thoughts?

There is a recall for 2000 and 2001 malibus, same as my wife's old 2000 alero which had the same problem. Sometimes really jamming the hazard switch fixed it. We had ours fixed for free under the recall but you probably won't have that luck. They replace the hazard switch to fix it, perhaps you can too. The most expensive hazard warning switch is 20 bucks, and it may take a day to install.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


1972 international pickup, v8 with dual exhaust.

Does anyone have a good estimate for labor hours requires to custom fabricate dual exhausts from the manifold back? Trying to decide if $1300 is reasonable for a complete replacement.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Ozmiander posted:

Not unless they're custom building the manifolds and its all stainless. Jesus.

That's what I was thinking. There's a ton of room for routing pipes underneath so you don't have to be particularly accurate and I don't want anything fancy.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Enourmo posted:

Like, no crank, hook up cables, starts fine with jump seconds later. And I doubt it's vapor lock, usually that makes a car crank fine but wont catch.

Update: happened again this morning, with a cold engine. As an added bonus, it now dies the second I so much as breathe on the gas pedal; I ended up having to take my mom's car to class for the day. Looks like I'm replacing the battery, and potentially deeper issues.

All battery connections clean and tight?

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


StormDrain posted:

1972 international pickup, v8 with dual exhaust.

Does anyone have a good estimate for labor hours requires to custom fabricate dual exhausts from the manifold back? Trying to decide if $1300 is reasonable for a complete replacement.

Update, went to another shop and was quoted 700. Whew!

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Senior Funkenstien posted:

So I am planning on going and looking at and possibly purchasing this: http://atlanta.craigslist.org/sat/cto/5241380070.html

What do you guys think of the 6 Cylinder 225 engine? Is it good enough to have some fun with?

Buy that car only if you want to swap the engine or are prepared to return it to all stock and just be slow.

That carb issue could just be needing a cleaning, like a fleck of rust or something stuck preventing fuel delivery so it only runs by enriching it with the choke pulled and the throttle up a bit. Or a vacuum leak which may be more likely considering there's a spare carb, there may be an issue with the base being tweaked.

But really that small inline 6 from the 70s is going to be slow, and the body looks fast, so you'll want it to be fast. It's not a Sunday cruiser.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Parts Kit posted:

I want to add some kind of anchors to my truck bed to help with securing loads. What are some good products for this, and what should I expect to have to do for installation? I don't have stake pockets or anything else that I could pop some product into, just a plain bed on an 87 b2000. Drilling is a-ok with me.

You can get some cheap d rings nearly anywhere that are a simple bolt in setup. They can come with square holes so you can use carriage bolts on them. Search for d rings or tie downs and you can find them with some hassle online. The bigger they get they eventually get to be weld on only but I doubt you need that strength in that application.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


mr. stefan posted:

So last Friday my Volvo 740 had a major radiator failure three miles from my house that resulted in me replacing the entire radiator and putting in new coolant once the thing limped home. Problem now is that the dash heat gauge is pegged all the way to the right when the electricals engage, even though the engine was sitting cold for the weekend. I've made sure there aren't any bubbles in the coolant system, I'm not getting any check engine lights, and the engine seems to be running normally (aside from some stalling on start, but that's always been a problem.)

Since I'm not getting any CE lights and the engine doesn't seem to be running worse, is it possibly just the gauge sensor that's hosed, or is it more likely the primary temperature sensor? I ask because on this model car, one of these things is much easier to access than the other and I don't want to replace the main sensor if I don't have to.

It's probably the sensor. They break sometimes and will give a faulty reading, like no resistance or super high resistance. You could test with the key in on and check the resistance.

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StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Sanschel posted:

Is there a cheap and easy way to replace the starter on a car if I know jack and poo poo about vehicles?

Longer version: 2005 Ford Five-Hundred
My girlfriend's crappy old tugboat finally started to capsize last night when it wouldn't start after she got off work. She and her employers attempted to jump it to no avail, and today AAA came out and attempting to jump it before concluding it was the starter and towing us to a nearby shop. Said shop is unable to even examine the car until Monday so it gets to sit in a parking lot until then, but they quoted us $480 after taxes to get it on the road.

As for the problems, the car refuses to turn over and makes a strained snapping noise as you crank the engine. It seems unlikely to be the battery as its only two years old and I was able to charge my phone as I waited for her to come get me in my car. There was heavy rain and flooding this week, the first in a long while, and the mechanic said its possible that water got splashed up into the undercarriage and into the starter to cause it to fail.

Is there a way for somebody with no experience working on cars to fix this without dropping almost half a month's rent into it? Otherwise we're considering loaning money from some place and this car just isn't worth that (it has a bevy of other issues that we've been considering ditching it for a while anyway, only hindered by the "can't afford a new car" thing).

You can do it, but if you have no tools and space you're in a weird place. If the starter really is bad, you may spend as much in tools and parts as the shop wants. There's a chance that the problem is just corrosion on the connections, and removing a few bolts and cleaning things may get you by and you can save a bundle, but you'll still need tools.

It comes down to how you want to spend your money. Repairing the Ford at the shop is simple, and keep in mind the 450 is comparable to a single months car payment. Investing in tools and doing it yourself will have a long term savings as you will be able to repair more things over time for less money. Buying the new car is going to cost more every month, every six months with higher insurance, and every year with a higher registration cost.

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