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EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

My Jeep has over thirty grease fittings that need to be hit during every oil change. I do it myself, but I'm real tempted to pay someone else to grease all the drat things.

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EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Neptr posted:

Does using tire slime make the tech's life miserable when he changes the tire?

Very. They have to clean that poo poo out to mount a tire.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Yeah, you'd have to be a saint to not get frustrated answering that, I got a bit miffed just reading it.

We know Kastein is no saint, just saying.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

I've got a pretty nasty ticking sound coming from my Jeep's 4.0 (190,000 miles). The harshness of it makes me think that the exhaust leak has suddenly become worse, typically metal on metal is more clunky. I'm open to suggestions and will be taking the valve cover off after work (fortunately I mostly telecommute). I kinda need to reseal the oil pan eventually, so this might be a good excuse to drop it and look for chunks.

This happened last night as I was getting onto the highway, lovely short onramp requires full throttle, shifted from third to fourth gear and this noise starts immediately. I didn't hit the rev limiter, if you're wondering. Louder with load, inconsistent at idle. No noticeable power loss or rough idle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yPOV47xMTs

Any ideas?

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

There may be quite a hefty core charge on there, though.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

door Door door posted:

With the demise of the FJ is the wrangler the only SUV they still make with a stick and manual transfer case?

The rumor mill kinda indicates that the stick might be going away soon lol

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Going to +1 the "cigarette stank never leaves a car". Hope you can flip it on CL

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

str, that's a terrible bit of advice. Blow up the starter, while driving with one hand holding the key.

Get a ride to a shop for a replacement, or get it towed. The tow might cost less than munching a starter and the gear ring it turns. You can't replace that on lots of vehicles, gotta do the whole flywheel/flex plate.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Oh, I haven't delved into anything automatic and made more recently than my birth. I do remember my mechanically challenged aunt causing that exact failure when I was younger.

Edit: I do have a somewhat stupid question, though. How do you go about disposing of a bucket that has a layer of oil on top of coolant? They came out of a ruined engine, coolant first, followed by oil. Do I need to attempt to get the oil off of the top, or what?

EightBit fucked around with this message at 06:27 on Mar 9, 2015

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Seconding kastein here, my TJ likes to do that in the summer. There's a TSB for it, in fact. Not covered by Chrysler, but they officially recognize the issue and there is a factory-approved repair method, which is to add a heat shield to the number 3 injector.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

CharlesDexterWard posted:

I've got a 2000 Toyota Celica and seem to be having issues with the car 'tram lining' on uneven roads. I don't really notice it much around town, usually at highway speeds if I go over a bump in the road I can feel the steering wheel move. On really bad roads with divots in the road the steering wheel will pull. It's not like I'm going to lose control but it still doesn't feel right.

There is an intersection in town which I pulled up to the other day though and the steering wheel turned pretty strongly as the road is quite uneven there.

I got my wheels aligned which seemed to help somewhat but not completely, and I also check my tyre inflation regularly to ensure its within spec.

I am going to try to inspect the tie rod ends soon to see if perhaps they need to be replaced. I'm still pretty new to wrenching on my own car so I've just been getting together jack stands and a jack, and waiting for my dad to come visit to give me a hand so I don't screw something up.

What should I be checking for this issue?

Did the alignment shop give you a printout of what the angles were before or after the alignment?

Is this something that has been getting worse? All vehicles are going to follow road contours to an extent, some more than others due to steering design etc. If your caster angle is really low, then you will get more of that effect, for instance. It's normal to feel some pull on a road that is sloped to enhance drainage.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

SperginMcBadposter posted:

Speaking of steering feel, I've got some slight oscillating in my steering wheel at 60+mph. What I mean is I can feel the steering wheel alternate between pulling slightly left and right, and the speed it alternates changes with vehicle speed. Is this a needs alignment/worn out rubber suspension bits issue? Car is 2001 ford zx2.

Yikes, sounds like worn out steering components. Not something that should be put off.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

So, with a polished crank and a completely new set of bearings ordered by the shop that polished the crank, how necessary is it to plastigage all this poo poo as I put it together? Dude at the shop said it was unnecessary, but they mostly work on racing engines so I'm not sure if that's spillover from the world where engines come apart every few months anyway.

This is for a Jeep 4.0 rebuild, by the way.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Decided to just deal with the ballache of using plastigage. Main bearings are good, gotta get the crank installed proper and do the piston checks.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

I'll take the infrequently broken updates over Apple's approach to consumer electronics, it's a loving pocket-sized computer, not just a toy.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Geirskogul posted:

Note, the passcode to my knockoff dongle was 6789 or 4567 or something, not 0000 like standard. This wasn't documented and I thought it was broken for awhile.

Mine was just like the passcode to my luggage

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Halogen bulbs are the standard headlight bulb, cheap, but the light output tends to be a little low compared to HID or LED. HID bulbs are more like a fluorescent light compared to a halogen; they generate a much brighter point of light, but require carefully tuned optics to avoid blinding other drivers at night. LED bulbs are just LEDs, cranked up to provide light for your car; they consume less power and last longer, but are brand new and thus significantly more expensive. You can't just swap in HID or LED lighting without going through the trouble to change the reflector/projector setup in your fixtures, or you will cause vision problems for other people on the road and you will get less effective lighting. It's not legal to do so in many jurisdictions, anyway.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.


+1 to replacing it. Oxygen sensors need to be hot to work.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

tadashi posted:

My 06 Hyundai Sonata (V6) has been overheating when I turn the AC on in heavy traffic lately. It has 104k miles on it. The radiator was replaced by a dealer service department about 6 months ago after I wrecked the front end pretty well . I'd like to try to at least do some basic troubleshooting before I just take it to someone and they ask for the maximum amount of money possible.

If I turn the fan on, it works. I can get hot air and non-cold air. Turning on the AC results in not-cold air as well as the engine temperature rising. It happens pretty quickly. In general, I try not to run the A/C in heavy traffic in any car for fear of overheating. No dashboard lights are on. Is there a good place to start troubleshooting on my own? I have very little automotive repair experience but I fix most other mechanical things in my life by doing research and following instructions.

Does it do this when moving? It's possible that your fan(s) aren't moving enough air, or any at all.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

SperginMcBadposter posted:

Is there a way to make tirerack let me choose sizes and bolt patterns manually? I want to buy a 15' 4x100mm pattern steel wheel but it only shows them in 14' for my car.

It looks like you'll have to shop by brand to pick the wheel size and bolt pattern.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

I have enough ground clearance to drain straight into a five gallon bucket. If you can't do that, transfer from your shorter drain pan to a five gallon bucket.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Dane posted:

A colleague is translating a text which has the following sentence:

During competition, a car produces around 80 decibels. The distinct ­whining sound comes primarily from the gearbox (sequential gearing, straight screw drive) and motor.

I'm trying to help her with the 'straight screw drive', but I'm coming up short. Any ideas?

I'm thinking that that refers to the differential, too. Though, to have "straight-cut" gears there, the pinion axis has to intersect the ring gear's axis. Older differentials actually used a worm-gear drive.

Edit: in addition to the straight-cut gearbox, those things are pretty loud

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Sweevo posted:

Or possibly they used an instrument cluster from another model which has a choke, and if your van doesn't then it's just an unused light that isn't connected to anything.

This. GM parts bin engineering.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Power Player posted:

I want to learn how to drive stick. I know no one who drives a stick.

Is my best bet just throwing up an ad on Craigslist asking randos if I can test-drive some piece of poo poo they have, or should I make calls to driving schools to see if they know anyone who has one?

Just buy one and drive it. You'll figure it out.

Some helpful hints, though:
  • Loading an engine at idle speed is harmful for several reasons: knocking from poorly mixed air/fuel at low engine speeds, low oil pressure, greatest amplitude of crankshaft flex occurs at low rpm. For most of the vehicles you get, keep the rpms above 1000 when you're loading the engine
  • Don't have your foot on the clutch pedal longer than it takes to shift gears. That includes sitting at a stoplight (put the transmission in neutral and take your foot off of the pedal). You can be prepared for the green if you watch the other lights, and you don't have to burn up your throwout bearing.
  • Engine braking is a contentious topic on these forums, but the commonly agreed upon advice is to coast in whatever gear you were in until the engine is close to idle speed, then use your brakes for the rest. Going through all the gears and using your right foot on the brakes and gas at the same time is probably best saved for the racetrack.
  • If you're panic braking, at least push in the clutch. Your brakes are more predictable and smooth than an engine winding down to idle. Especially if you have ABS.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

I don't trust the old mechanic's wisdom of using higher viscosity oil to reduce oil burning. Higher viscosity oil burns just the same. The thing is, it doesn't flow as easily, so less will get squirted onto your cylinder walls. You will see less smoke, because there's less oil there to burn in the first place. Without speccing your bearings for it or putting in an oil pump that can keep the flow up with higher viscosity and pressure, you shouldn't deviate from your manufacturer's viscosity specification. Accept that it's going to burn oil until you correct whatever situation is causing the oil burn (stuck rings, valve guide seals, etc.). That, or dump enough engine honey into it to dump it on CL and be that guy.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Leperflesh posted:

I have to pass smog once every two years. I can go with a high-viscosity oil once every two years if that's what it takes.

Also, this engine can handle a higher viscosity than 5w30. The shop manual says 10w30 for temps of 0F and above. Since I never seen temps below about 30F, I'm comfortable with a higher viscosity... 20w on the low end will be fine, especially during these summer months when a "cold" start is still likely to be at least 50 degrees.

If this were a low-mileage engine, I'd probably agree with you, of course. In this case, it's an engine from 1992 that has 220k miles on it. If it's leaking oil into the chambers, it's because the piston rings and/or the cylinder walls are worn enough to let oil ooze past, in a larger quantity than it did when new. Reducing the amount of oil penetrating to the cylinder won't accelerate wear, since we're only attempting to replicate the amount of oil that's "supposed" to be there.

The oil that gets into your cylinder isn't what prevents wear, it's the amount that gets splashed on the back of the piston, which will be reduced with a higher viscosity oil.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Arriviste posted:

Because OILCHAT I have to ask:
Had my oil changed a few hundred miles ago and went with the usual 5W. The attendant asked if I wanted to swap to high mileage synthetic since the truck is so old. Said I'd consider it on the next change.

1995 Nissan 2WD VG30 (V6 3.0L) 5-spd that just hit 70k. No magic smoke escapes from it and it throws no codes. Am I going to dislodge any good gunk if I swap to this other type of oil or is that an old shadetree's tale that it'll trigger leaks because of the detergents?

I think it has more to do with older engines tending to have flat lifters or other parts that require higher zddp levels than newer oil blends provide. Even the supposed high-mileage oils aren't as high as what was used in the past, as zinc degrades catalytic converters. If you want the engine to last a long time, it wouldn't hurt to keep using whatever oil you were using and just add a zddp supplement. That is, if it has flat lifters.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

If your engine has hydraulic lifters, it probably doesn't have any adjustment. If you have a bit of a tap, you should try to use a mechanic's stethoscope (a broom handle works) to locate the sound. Lots of things can cause taps, you gotta know what part of the engine is making noise.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Make sure that you change everything that requires separating the engine and transmission. Most clutch kits come with the necessary parts: clutch disc, pressure plate, release bearing, and pilot bearing. Might be a good time to do the rear main seal.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

You might want to locate a slide hammer ahead of time, as it is the best way to pull pilot bearings. Don't be like me, and make sure that you get the alignment tool all the way into the pilot bearing!

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

taco_fox posted:

1994 Chevy C1500

Why are my tires wearing out so fast? I got a set of Kumho KR21s two years ago and they're almost worn to the wear bars after 30,000 miles. The tires came with an 85,000 mile warranty, so I'm not even going to make it half way through the supposed life expectancy.

I only rotated them once in that period. I keep them properly inflated. They seem to have pretty even wear patterns. All four tires have the same wear.

Are Kumhos just lovely tires or is it something with my truck?

taco_fox posted:

I only rotated them once in that period.

This might have something to do with it. That, or you are overloading them.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

PDP-1 posted:

I've got an '04 Jeep Wrangler X and a set of mirror relocator brackets that bolt onto the sides for when I have the top off and half-doors on. The brackets mount on some factory Torx bolts that are painted and countersunk, and every time I mess with them the Torx wrench bites through the paint layer exposing the metal below causing the bolt to rust a bit. After ten years of repeating this procedure the nibs of the Torx sockets rusted out badly enough that one of them stripped clean off when I tried to remove it (top bolt in pic below).

Anyone got any neat tricks for removing a sticky, stripped, countersunk bolt? I tried hosing it down with a few variants of liquid wrench and hammering an allen wrench/slightly larger Torx driver into the socket in the hopes of getting enough bite to turn it out one last time, but no luck. Anything else I should try before drilling it out?



Second question: There are some plastic parts on the fenders and around the wheel wells that are getting pretty faded (see below). Are there any good wipe-on products that'd bring some of the original color back?



I'd suggest getting a permanent mirror relocation setup. Going doorless is supposed to be a spontaneous thing, and the easier it is to switch, the better. Or, you could get some factory half doors that have mirrors.

The way the weather has been down here in Texas this spring has been pretty crazy the past few months, so I get a week or so of doorless weather, then it's two loving weeks of flash flood warnings. My mirrors just go in the hinges and require only one bolt, but that's still more than I want to do when the weather is being fickle.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

It definitely warrants more investigation. Could be air in the lines, a leak somewhere, etc.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Your local auto parts store doesn't have engine enamel?

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

You have all the symptoms of a battery failure, don't discount it because everything outside the battery looks peachy keen. Did you at least try to measure the sitting voltage?

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Motronic posted:

That sounds a lot more like piston slap then rod knock.

Yeah, that's what my 4.0 did for a while before it munched the piston completely.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

No, I've driven plenty of vehicles with poo poo visibility and didn't have issues with hitting everything around me. It might not be correctable, just to be honest. Some people just don't have the spatial awareness wired up in their brains.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Mercury Ballistic posted:

I had the same P0431 code a year back in my Tacoma. I ended up finding that a small hole in a vacuum hose was causing the EGR to perform poorly, and throwing the readings for the Cat off. This is my theory at least, since repairing the hose stopped the code from returning. Not saying it is your issue, but it could be another to consider.

Jeeps with the 4.0 don't have an EGR, so this isn't his problem.

EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Elmnt80 posted:

I had done this and I think I can hear a faint sound of metal scraping, but no resistance. I really only hear it when the engine is revving up above idle, so I dunno. I've already replaced the tensioner pulley while trying to track down the source of the squeal, so I'll probably just throw the other pulley at it when I'm at work tomorrow and call it good enough. Its not like pulling the belt off of a 5.3 in a truck is hard.

A properly functioning idler pulley will have a bit of resistance, but it will turn completely smooth. If it has no drag, the seals have probably failed and the grease has escaped, the bearing rollers will follow suit shortly.

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EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Gasoline is about 6.3 pounds per gallon (going to assume US units based on the .gov source). A full tank of gas in my jeep is approximately 19 gallons, so almost the weight of an average healthy woman. If you have a smaller tank, you might not notice the difference, but I can definitely feel the difference when I have two extra people.

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