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Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

Ignoranus posted:

I made this Bolognese sauce in the pressure cooker the night before last and my fiance is still raving about it. I didn't find pancetta so I just used smoked bacon and I forgot to add the cream at the end, but it was still amazing. We have yet to be disappointed by the pressure cooker.

EDIT: If I make this cream of mushroom soup but use my leftover beef stock instead of the vegetable stock in the recipe (and omit the added salt), does that sound like it would result in some sort of catastrophe or would that probably be fine?

I really want to try the bolognese, but the 30-minute browning on medium saute in the Instantpot... That sounds excessive, right?

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Yu-Gi-Ho!
May 12, 2006

STOP THE PIG
PUT A BULLET IN ITS HEAD




Croatoan posted:

Guys, it's what is called a joke post. Suggesting I plug it in a 220v outlet? C'mon.

Well I mean it's sold in England, which uses 220-240V, so...

Ignoranus
Jun 3, 2006

HAPPY MORNING

Trabant posted:

I really want to try the bolognese, but the 30-minute browning on medium saute in the Instantpot... That sounds excessive, right?

I didn't track the actual timing, just stirred occasionally while working on other stuff, so I'm not sure if it took an actual half hour. It DOES take a bit of time though because, as written, it's not the ground beef by itself - it's the ground beef added on top of the pancetta/bacon, onion, carrot and celery stick.

MeKeV
Aug 10, 2010


Trabant posted:

I really want to try the bolognese, but the 30-minute browning on medium saute in the Instantpot... That sounds excessive, right?

It's not essential, it just gives a deeper flavour.

You can make the same recipe with no browning at all, it will just be less tasty.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Cooking fatty ground meats for so long that they render out and begin to fry in their own fat is a masterstroke that I learned from a GWS post by a guy that made a variation on Mario Batalli's ragu. It adds so much depth and rich flavor that I do it all the time. I even do it with things like laab now.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


MeKeV posted:

It's not essential, it just gives a deeper flavour.

You can make the same recipe with no browning at all, it will just be less tasty.

Get out if here Mr kimball

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

Bolognese report: pretty freaking awesome! Had a really rich flavour, and the wife described it as restaurant-quality.

I did not brown the meat for 30 minutes though -- I genuinely think it would've burned, even though I got 85% lean beef. I probably did it for about 20-22 minutes on medium saute.

Boosh!
Apr 12, 2002



Ignoranus posted:

I made this Bolognese sauce in the pressure cooker the night before last and my fiance is still raving about it. I didn't find pancetta so I just used smoked bacon and I forgot to add the cream at the end, but it was still amazing. We have yet to be disappointed by the pressure cooker.


Made this the other night (30 min browning included). Came out really loving good. Thanks for the rec.

Taima
Dec 31, 2006


There's no way that's anywhere near as good as the Serious Eats pressure cooker bolognese, I'm sure it's tasty tho

large hands
Jan 24, 2006


Taima posted:

There's no way that's anywhere near as good as the Serious Eats pressure cooker bolognese, I'm sure it's tasty tho

yeah the recipe above just looks like the SE one but without the extra meats, parmesan, fresh sage and gelatin. i have vacuum bags full of the SE stuff in the freezer and my wife and i are totally addicted to it it's just crazy good.

MsJoelBoxer
Aug 31, 2004

Your judicial opinions hypnotize me.

Made this Mongolian Beef recipe in the Instant Pot last night with a few small changes. First, I cut the whole recipe in half because my flank steak was only 1 lb. Then I reduced the brown sugar down to 1/4 cup and doubled the fresh ginger. Came out really great. Meat was super tender and the sauce had a great consistency and flavor.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Isn't Mongolian beef a wok dish? What is the benefit of pressure when it could be a quick high eat cook that is faster than a pressure cooker?

MsJoelBoxer
Aug 31, 2004

Your judicial opinions hypnotize me.

Ranter posted:

Isn't Mongolian beef a wok dish? What is the benefit of pressure when it could be a quick high eat cook that is faster than a pressure cooker?

Completely fair point, but I have an electric glass cook top that doesn't get pans screaming hot, so I don't own a wok. I guess I could put one on my outdoor grill if I really wanted to stir fry, but for me the pressure cooker is more convenient for this.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Gonna try making St. Louis style ribs in the Instant Pot

The plan is to cut the rack into 4ths (since I have a Duo Mini), use the steamer basket insert to prop up the ribs, cook for ~25 minutes with about a cup of water or so since I'm not looking to get flavor from the liquid, lather on some barbecue sauce when they're done, and broil to caramelize the tops. Am I required to submerge the meat in liquid if I'm pressure cooking, or do I just need some liquid in there at all?

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

Does anyone have a go-to recipe for beef short ribs? I'm craving the braised-in-red-wine, served-with-mashed-potatoes kind, but have never tried making them in the cooker.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Somewhat related to my last post: if I'm making stock from beef or chicken bones, do I need to completely submerge the bones, or can I use a minimum of liquid for the PC so I don't have to reduce it all at the end?

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


You don't need to submerge.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Submarine Sandpaper posted:

You don't need to submerge.

Sweet. I'll just use the minimum 1cup + some bones then!

Flash Gordon Ramsay
Sep 28, 2004



Grimey Drawer

For stock? It's not like the bones are gonna liquify. You want to have enough liquid to cover them, unless I'm missing something.

Jay Carney
Mar 23, 2007

If you do that you will die on the toilet.


Yeah even if you are making a demiglace or something you need a medium to get all the flavor and gelatin out of the bones. I'd cover at the very least.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Ohh, never mind then I just wanna speed up reducing my stock, I'm lazy.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


I guess I"m usually veggie heavy. I only fill about half way.

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



You don't NEED to reduce your stock, really. It just makes it more concentrated. I don't do it a whole lot, personally.

Kalista
Oct 18, 2001


The Midniter posted:

You don't NEED to reduce your stock, really. It just makes it more concentrated. I don't do it a whole lot, personally.

I don't either. I take a couple chicken carcasses, other bones, some wings and a drumstick or two, leftover vegetable scraps that I haven't fed to my worms, throw a chopped onion, carrots, celery, peppercorns, and bay leaf in there, fill the pressure cooker up halfway and let it go for an hour. Then I strain it out over a colander first, then fine cheesecloth.

I usually get about 12 cups of broth per batch that I portion out into silicon bread (2 cups) and muffin molds (1/3 cup), then freeze overnight. Next day I vacuum seal them into individual bricks (for the 2 cup portions) and packs of three. If I do 3-4 batches in a weekend, I don't have to make stock again (or buy any) for 3-4 months. I use it in dishes on a 1 to 1 ratio for wherever stock is called for.

My broth isn't very clear if that's what you're going for, but it's got lots of gelatin and is very tasty.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Just don't be like my housemate when he makes 'broth':



That's more of his 'broth' in the main compartment on the right of the photo, too.

Toshimo
Aug 23, 2012


Why is broth in scare quotes?

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



It was more like water with some vegetable in it. Dude went the complete opposite of reduction.

Note the leaking of the 'broth' onto the shelves and main compartment.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Broth is just watered down stock right? What is the purpose? I use stock for everything.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Broth is seasoned.

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



Submarine Sandpaper posted:

Broth is seasoned.

There's no real hard and fast rule. If you google "broth" vs "stock" the top hits are all about whether broth or stock involves bones vs meat, for example. They're used interchangeably.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Wow that's dumb, no such thing as veggie broth or stock then.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


In fact I'm going to call google about it.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Tried making St. Louis style ribs in the IP, brushing on sauce, and broiling them for 10 min last night. Disappeared too quickly to get a picture of them.

They were a little too big for the Duo Mini, so I had to squish them a bit. I dont think it had a big effect on the result, though. 10 minutes of broiling was a little too long, so the tops got burnt a little - next time I'll go to 7 min and evaluate from there. And the ribs didn't quite have the tenderness I wanted in the center - I cooked on high for 30 minutes under pressure, and I suspect it would have benefited from another 5~10 min of PC. It also didn't have the exact same texture as smoking them would have, but I think it's a fine substitute for smoking ribs if you're not too picky. I brushed on some original flavor Sweet Baby Ray's for the broiling, and I'm a fan of it.

Def recommend trying it out if you're curious!! I personally would advise splitting the rack up into individual ribs, just to make it easier on smaller pots. Plus, it might work better for broiling.

Pollyanna fucked around with this message at Aug 31, 2017 around 13:48

QuarkMartial
Sep 25, 2004
[This Space for Rent]

Pollyanna posted:

Tried making St. Louis style ribs in the IP, brushing on sauce, and broiling them for 10 min last night. Disappeared too quickly to get a picture of them.

They were a little too big for the Duo Mini, so I had to squish them a bit. I dont think it had a big effect on the result, though. 10 minutes of broiling was a little too long, so the tops got burnt a little - next time I'll go to 7 min and evaluate from there. And the ribs didn't quite have the tenderness I wanted in the center - I cooked on high for 30 minutes under pressure, and I suspect it would have benefited from another 5~10 min of PC. It also didn't have the exact same texture as smoking them would have, but I think it's a fine substitute for smoking ribs if you're not too picky. I brushed on some original flavor Sweet Baby Ray's for the broiling, and I'm a fan of it.

Def recommend trying it out if you're curious!! I personally would advise splitting the rack up into individual ribs, just to make it easier on smaller pots. Plus, it might work better for broiling.

Man, if I can find some cheap ribs, I'mma try this.

Zanna
Oct 9, 2012


The difference between stock and broth, as I was taught in culinary school, is that a stock is meant to be used as an ingredient in something else, never consumed on its own, while a broth can serve as a soup by itself. So broths are seasoned, and will generally have a higher meat to bone ratio, whereas you don't add salt to a stock, and you'll generally use more bones for more gelatin; you can use a stock to make a broth, but you can't really use a broth to make a stock. I was also taught that there's no such thing as a real vegetable stock, because stocks require gelatin from bones; at best, you can have an unseasoned vegetable broth. Of course, in practical terms, there's little to no difference between the two; they can be used interchangeably for the most part.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Is there an important reason recipes tell you to NPR when cooking beans? I tried cooking some pink beans alongside pork shoulder and did a quick release, for about 25 minutes. The beans were wrinkled but rock hard. I cooked them again for 35 minutes and they're still really crappy. Was it the quick release that did it?

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Pollyanna posted:

Is there an important reason recipes tell you to NPR when cooking beans? I tried cooking some pink beans alongside pork shoulder and did a quick release, for about 25 minutes. The beans were wrinkled but rock hard. I cooked them again for 35 minutes and they're still really crappy. Was it the quick release that did it?
The reason not to quick release is that it can cause the beans to split during the rapid depressurization. If the beans are cooked, they won't ever get uncooked, no matter how you release the pressure.

Scythe
Jan 26, 2004


Given that quick-release is also bad for stock for similar reasons (rapid depressurization means bubbles means cloudiness), that made me wonder: are there any situations in which quick release is actively good for the final product? Or is it just a neutral-at-best time saver for things like big hunks of braised meat etc.?

Carillon
May 9, 2014



I use it for risotto so that the rice doesn't over cook and believe that it's pretty important there for instance. As well I use it when I'm making a tonkatsu ramen broth which wants to be cloudy.

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wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

I use a potato masher on my bean soup so quick release makes no difference. I use quick release when I'm in a hurry or if I don't want something to overcook, otherwise I mostly use slow release.

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