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Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

Lots of new pressure cooker interest here.
If cooking meat, there is no substitute for a skillet on the stove. bugger stirring around ground beef for 30 min in an instapot. Get it on a cast iron or stainless steel skillet/frypan and cook in ~ 1cup batches for 3min. let all that water out, fill the air with steam. Chuck your onions in after and then caramelize some tomato paste and then with some wine or stock to deglaze. You just can't do that in a teflon pressure cooker, you need more heat and more surface area to get that part done. gently caress it if that means an extra pan to wash, Worth it.

With beans, they vary by age or how long they have soaked. You can't trust many internet guides. After you buy a bag of beans just do 1/2 cup or whatever going by what you're told as a test run, alone, then adjust. It's not wasteful as after you have dialed in those beans you can freeze them for a later meal. Some for me are really quick if cooked solo, some take much longer if cooked in sauce/salt. Most of the time when dealing with dried beans I prefer to at least par cook them plain in water. Things get messy when using a pressure cooker with unknown staleness when cooking them in sauce/salt and meat, way to easy to under or overcook them if you don't know that particular bag of beans. It's easier to get to know that bag with a small test (that's not wasteful anyway) and dial it in to use for the next week or 3.

Fo3 fucked around with this message at Oct 3, 2017 around 17:23

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Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

Fo3 posted:

You just can't do that in a teflon pressure cooker, you need more heat and more surface area to get that part done.

I don't disagree, but Instant Pot's liner is stainless steel and on the saute setting gets hot like a mother.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

That, and I didn't get a pressure cooker for taco meat.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



wormil posted:

That, and I didn't get a pressure cooker for taco meat.

There are people in this thread discussing recipes and methods for pressure cooked ragu alla bolognese though, which aligns with what fo3 is saying.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Ranter posted:

There are people in this thread discussing recipes and methods for pressure cooked ragu alla bolognese though, which aligns with what fo3 is saying.

there are pressure cookers that are stainless. not everything is an isntapot

Trastion
Jul 24, 2003
The one and only.

Submarine Sandpaper posted:

there are pressure cookers that are stainless. not everything is an isntapot

My Instapot has a stainless pot, don't they all?

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Trastion posted:

My Instapot has a stainless pot, don't they all?

some are ceramic and other brands use teflon

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Submarine Sandpaper posted:

there are pressure cookers that are stainless. not everything is an isntapot

Instant Pots are stainless. They do sell sell non-stick inserts but you have to buy them separately.

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

Submarine Sandpaper posted:

some are ceramic and other brands use teflon

Mines teflon as it's an older electric one. I had the option of buying a stainless steel pot though. But anyway I like the teflon as it makes it good for pressure cooking rice.

E: Mines about 4 years old, nu wave brand, sold in australia before anyone had heard of an instant pot.

Fo3 fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2017 around 23:01

I like turtles
Aug 6, 2009

"Wouldn't want to see an angry turtle with a gun, would ya? "

Well...


Pressure canner - I have an induction range so the remotely affordable pressure canners I have seen won't work because they are aluminum. Is there a ferrous pressure canner out there? Or just use a transfer plate? I could see the huge size of the canner being an issue with a flat top too...

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


People use turkey friers a lot for the canners outside and it avoids making your house super hot in August (and October this year)

I like turtles
Aug 6, 2009

"Wouldn't want to see an angry turtle with a gun, would ya? "

Well...


Makes good sense. Maybe I'll have an excuse to do it next year.

I recently got https://www.amazon.com/Indian-Insta.../dp/1939754542/ for like $2 on kindle and have been making tons of indian food.
Are there any other awesome pressure cooker cookbooks I should get?

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

I like turtles posted:

Makes good sense. Maybe I'll have an excuse to do it next year.

I recently got https://www.amazon.com/Indian-Insta.../dp/1939754542/ for like $2 on kindle and have been making tons of indian food.
Are there any other awesome pressure cooker cookbooks I should get?

I don't know if it's awesome but I like it.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804185328/

The Indian Instant Pot looks interesting and I think I will buy it. Are the ingredients reasonably accessible? I live in a smallish town that doesn't have much variety outside the basics and there are few Indians here.

I like turtles
Aug 6, 2009

"Wouldn't want to see an angry turtle with a gun, would ya? "

Well...


wormil posted:

I don't know if it's awesome but I like it.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804185328/

The Indian Instant Pot looks interesting and I think I will buy it. Are the ingredients reasonably accessible? I live in a smallish town that doesn't have much variety outside the basics and there are few Indians here.

Quite accessible yeah for smallish town US, I also have no Indian markets around here and can get everything I need from winco, or a health food store that has decent spices and garam masala - but there is a recipe for that too if there is not a good local source.
I won't pretend it is super legit, like definitely toast more of the spices, use ghee more if you can, etc, but it is "decent local Indian restaurant" quality, and way cheaper.

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



There are a lot of guidelines out there for how long to pressure cook different varieties of unsoaked dried beans. What's a good interval to use when you try them after the initial cook but they're not done? I cooked some red kidney beans yesterday and they weren't done after 30 minutes at pressure, so I cooked them for another four minutes, and now they're a bit more overdone than I'd like. I feel like any interval shorter than that is going to be a real time sink, having to wait for the pressure to release, and then bringing it back up to pressure if they're not done. If I had any patience, I wouldn't be using a pressure cooker to cook them.

DeathSandwich
Apr 24, 2008

I fucking hate puzzles.


So are the connected features of the Bluetooth Instant Pot worth it over a baseline model and/or the ultra? It's high time I finally buy one, but my inner nerd demands tactile control and I'm at kind of an impasse when trying to figure out if the extra controls are worth the extra 60 bucks. If the phone app is of questionable value then I would probably give it a pass in lieu of the Ultra and pocket the $10 for more beans and bones to throw in it.

I guess I probably ought to factor in if I ever let my mom borrow it, there's no way on earth I'd be able to teach her how to bluetooth in and program it too. Maybe I should just spring for the ultra and call it good.

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



I severely doubt that having bluetooth on your instant pot is worth anything at all.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Hackers will use it to bypass security settings and turn your instant pot into a bomb.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Ranter posted:

Hackers will use it to bypass security settings and turn your instant pot into a bomb.

It happened to my aunt in Canada. And then she died waiting in line for socialized medicine.

But yeah, I've yet to use my instant pot and thought, 'wish I had Bluetooth on this.'

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

The Midniter posted:

There are a lot of guidelines out there for how long to pressure cook different varieties of unsoaked dried beans. What's a good interval to use when you try them after the initial cook but they're not done? I cooked some red kidney beans yesterday and they weren't done after 30 minutes at pressure, so I cooked them for another four minutes, and now they're a bit more overdone than I'd like. I feel like any interval shorter than that is going to be a real time sink, having to wait for the pressure to release, and then bringing it back up to pressure if they're not done. If I had any patience, I wouldn't be using a pressure cooker to cook them.

That's weird, having 4 min make such a huge difference. The guide I have says just 30-40min for kidney beans (and do a quick release). So to answer your question always do a quick release and 3min?
The problem with dried beans is age and source varies, so there's no true guideline to trust anyway. I am always surprised by how long I've read to cook chickpeas as mine are heaps quicker than any guide. I guess they are fresher here for some reason. But the kidney beans I get are need to be cooked on the longer side of any guides, so I would have done 35min at least -- which you say made yours too soft.
E: I've had to put beans back in for another 10min and they still weren't done!

The only thing I can suggest is what I've said before. When you buy a 1kg bag of beans do a 1/4-1/2 cup test run and adjust cooking time for your real recipe cook later on depending on how they come out. Freeze the test run beans for use later so nothing is wasted anyway.

Fo3 fucked around with this message at Oct 17, 2017 around 13:23

tonberrytoby
Feb 29, 2012

Gently enveloping the target with indiscriminate love.


I also always had the experience that re-pressurizing beans (and peas) once they are fully re-hydrated turns them to mush very quickly.
I generally only pressure-cook dried beans for 20 minutes, and then let them slowly cool down for another 20-30 minutes.
Then I adjust the mushiness by cooking them without pressure.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Joke's on them.


Iíve had the most success by doing an NPR instead of a quick release. For some reason, thatís resulted in beans that are more likely to be done for me.

Carillon
May 9, 2014



Also wouldn't it depend on the recipe you're cooking in? I can imagine if it's very acidic you'd end up taking a lot longer than just cooking the beans themselves. I just did red beans for 40 minutes and they were just barely getting to the right degree of softness, some were great but some were still just a bit under. This was one pound of beans with a holy trinity sofrito and some adobo chiles and some chicken broth. I can imagine if it was just chicken broth, they'd be done quicker, and if I had a bunch of tomatoes it would have taken longer.

Casull
Aug 13, 2005



I'm new to pressure-cooking and feel like getting something that'll let me cook in bulk for a week just for myself (and I want to eat something else besides baked chicken.) After reading the reviews, I'm trying to figure if I want the IP Duo80 or the IP Ultra, and I'm trying to figure out if the features of the Ultra are worth getting over the capacity of the Duo80. Opinions?

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Go higher capacity.

Otto Von Jizzmark
Dec 27, 2004


A couple years ago I left the mostly thawed thanksgiving turkey on the counter overnight. My wife wouldn't eat or feed it to the kids.

I put the whole 30lb bird in the pressure cooker for an hour or two for the dog. The bones turned to mush so the dog could eat the whole thing.

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



A 30 lb. turkey? How goddamn big is your pressure cooker?

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

Steve Yun posted:

Go higher capacity.

Unless you're living in a closet, this is always the right decision.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Casull posted:

...if the features of the Ultra are worth getting over the capacity of the Duo80.

I use my Duo like this: I put stuff in it, seal the lid, press "manual" then adjust the time. Sometimes I use the "saute" function first. Once I switched from high pressure to low pressure. For me, extra functions are clutter. I have a pressure cooker so I don't have to slow cook, or set timers. The Duo does have buttons for various things but I never use them because I like the control and certainty of a manual timer.

tldr: go with higher capacity like the others said.

kloa
Feb 14, 2007



Not that I want another kitchen gadget taking up space in the kitchen, but Iíve come to realize I want something faster than a slow cooker every now and then.

For instance, I usually do slow cooker pork for carnitas, and then dump them on a baking sheet on broil to dry out and crisp up in the oven. Could I get similar results with a pressure cooker and broiling? Or does meat ďneedĒ time to become soft and tender a la slow cookers?

Mikey Purp
Sep 30, 2008

I realized it's gotten out of control. I realize I'm out of control.

Yes, you can get pretty much identical results to the slow cooker in a pressure cooker, and it takes about a quarter of the time. Throw away your slow cooker and get an instant pot, then you'll have the best of both worlds.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Also instead of putting the meat on a sheet and drying it out, you can pan fry it in fat (pork fat!). Moist but also crisp on one side is my preferred style.

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



Mikey Purp posted:

Yes, you can get pretty much identical results to the slow cooker in a pressure cooker, and it takes about a quarter of the time. Throw away your slow cooker and get an instant pot, then you'll have the best of both worlds.

Pressure cookers are like this as far as how long poo poo takes to cook:

code:
SLOW---------------------------------------------|-------------------------------------------------FAST

Slow cooker                                     Oven                                          Pressure Cooker
As someone who likes to cook food and then eat the food, I don't know why anyone would gently caress around with a slow cooker. I've done the whole "turn it on in the morning so you have a warm and hearty meal for you when you get home from work!" and it always just turns into overcooked mushy slop. gently caress slow cookers.

kloa
Feb 14, 2007



Ranter posted:

Also instead of putting the meat on a sheet and drying it out, you can pan fry it in fat (pork fat!). Moist but also crisp on one side is my preferred style.

Thatís pretty much how mine turns out. I lay it all in foil, so the juices and fat just settle on the bottom, but the top gets crispy and caramelized

I think Iíll go ahead on the pressure cooker then. I get tired of putting things in slow cookers too late, and then end up eating at 9 o clock at night.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

After getting an Instant Pot I got rid of our slow cooker and put the dutch ovens in the attic. It falls under the category of why didn't I do this sooner.

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



Eh, your instant pot doesn't reduce things the same way as being in the oven low and slow for a while. I still use my dutch ovens for things.

Mikey Purp
Sep 30, 2008

I realized it's gotten out of control. I realize I'm out of control.

Yeah I'd say that for long braises and things a dutch oven will always have a place in my kitchen. That being said, with some experimenting you can figure out how to decrease the liquid in a dutchoven/slow cooker recipe to get almost the same results in an instant pot. It's not exactly the same, but it means I can eat "braised" short ribs on a weeknight which is loving boss.

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

Hold the line, I have shitposting to do.


I will never ever make boiled peanuts other than in a instant pot again.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Chemmy posted:

Eh, your instant pot doesn't reduce things the same way as being in the oven low and slow for a while. I still use my dutch ovens for things.

Take the top off and saute. I reduce liquids all the time. And you need less liquid to start with so it doesn't take long. I cook way more with a pressure cooker than I ever did a dutch oven because I can start at 5pm and eat at ~7pm instead of start at 5pm to make dinner for tomorrow, while I'm also making dinner for tonight.

But yeah, like Mikey Purp says, if converting a recipe from slow to pressure, cut way back on the liquid.

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VulgarandStupid
Aug 5, 2003

YEAH

LICK MY ASS

BITCH


Just got an instant pot. Iím a big meat eater and like to sous vide things as well, any recommendations for relatively easy stuff to make?

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