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RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006

Can I say "shit" around the baby?


Grimey Drawer

Furism posted:

Somebody read their Terms & Conditions/EULA? Pretty sure they're going to look at the files metadata for their usual marketing purposes. Microsoft already does this with Office 365 to sell you later on "business intelligence."

Note I'm not saying whether or not it's true or false or good or bad, just that people should make sure what Google is going to do with their files.

Well, I'm just uninstalling backup and sync and accepting that google drive is going to be taken offline in a few months.

Crashplan looks like it was the go-to until it went business clients only. What are the affordable alternatives?

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GreenBuckanneer
Sep 15, 2007



Saying GDrive is going to be taken offline is disingenuous. Google Drive will still be around. The desktop software is now called Backup and Sync.

GuyGizmo
Feb 26, 2003

stupid babies need the most attention


I'm also a CrashPlan Home user and while my subscription doesn't expire for several more months, I'm wondering what good alternatives exist that have comparable features.

The features from CrashPlan that I like a lot are:
  • Being able to back up any file on my computer, including on external drives
  • Being able to directly download the files I care about
  • Being able to restore old versions of files
  • Unlimited space
  • Being able to use a private encryption key where the decryption is done client side (so only I can ever decrypt my backed up data)
That said, the one thing I hate hate hate about CrashPlan is their god drat desktop app. It uses so much loving memory. So while I could shell out for CrashPlan Pro, I don't really want to.

The two most common choices are Backblaze and Carbonite.

I don't think Carbonite is a good option for me. I'd need to go for the more expensive plan in order to include multiple hard drives. Also, I'm on a mac so I couldn't use a private encryption key. And I don't like how they force you to manually select backing up files over 4 GB. I really want it to automatically back up everything.

Backblaze might be my best bet. Apparently their desktop app is well written and not a resource hog, but their restoration process sucks... I'd much rather just download the files I want than download a zip file. And I don't like how when you use a private encryption key, you still need to send it to them to restore anything because the decryption is done on their servers. They claim the key is never saved, but it still makes me uncomfortable. Maybe I'm just being paranoid for no good reason though.

Those are the main options I'm aware of, and some cursory research hasn't led me to find anything else. Are there any other ones that might fit my needs?

Furism
Feb 21, 2006

Live long and headbang


There's nothing today on the market similar to what CrashPlan Home used to offer. Probably because it was too cheap and some people were abusing that, I don't know. But there's no direct equivalent. People here tend to go with duplicity/restic against a BackBlaze B2 online storage, but that's more involved than a "it just works" software. I think the closest you'll get is CloudBerry Backup (https://www.cloudberrylab.com/), it's a one-off purchase, and then add a subscription to whatever cloud provider on top of that (for reference, my 400 GB of backup costs me less than $2/month.

Carbonite is poo poo.You can't specify which files you want to backup. They have their own list of acceptable formats (apparently mp3 and flac are not on it) and won't upload anything else outside of that list, even if you tell it to.

GuyGizmo
Feb 26, 2003

stupid babies need the most attention


Furism posted:

There's nothing today on the market similar to what CrashPlan Home used to offer. Probably because it was too cheap and some people were abusing that, I don't know. But there's no direct equivalent. People here tend to go with duplicity/restic against a BackBlaze B2 online storage, but that's more involved than a "it just works" software.
I'm definitely looking for something that requires minimal work or maintenance on my part, which was part of the original appeal of CrashPlan.

quote:

I think the closest you'll get is CloudBerry Backup (https://www.cloudberrylab.com/), it's a one-off purchase, and then add a subscription to whatever cloud provider on top of that (for reference, my 400 GB of backup costs me less than $2/month.
Interesting, I hadn't heard of this before! Thanks for the tip. I have about 4 TB of data that needs to be backed up, though, and I'm having a hard time figuring out what that would cost me for any of the more popular cloud storage providers. I'm getting the impression it will be fairly costly due to the large number of files I would be backing up.

quote:

Carbonite is poo poo.You can't specify which files you want to backup. They have their own list of acceptable formats (apparently mp3 and flac are not on it) and won't upload anything else outside of that list, even if you tell it to.
That's garbage. I wasn't going to use it, but now I wonder why anyone ever would.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!


GuyGizmo posted:


That's garbage. I wasn't going to use it, but now I wonder why anyone ever would.

Uh, it should upload any file you select of any type. It just doesn't pick certain media files by default.

If you're experiencing otherwise, call support.

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

I went with backblaze but so far I'm not particularly impressed. The way you choose what to back up is rear end backwards - by default it backs up EVERYTHING on every hard drive connected, minus a few generic system folders and filetypes, and you have to add an exclusion for every. single. folder. you don't want it to back up. I'd much rather point it at the few specific folders I care about than add a billion exceptions so I'm not trying to upload 3 TB of poo poo. The backup client is also a gigantic resource hog and their support's "solution" is to disable your antivirus before every backup.

If there's a different client that can back up to the backblaze storage I'm already paying for and using (so I don't have to run another full backup) I'd love to hear about it.

-Dethstryk-
Oct 20, 2000


I need to add in another mention for Duplicati. If you're comfortable enough with setting up services or anything command-line related, you can get it to do just about anything. I've setup multiple configurations to head off to Backblaze B2 which is also great, since it's faster to setup than Amazon S3 and much cheaper.

Twobirds
Oct 17, 2000

We tried Ubik for thirty days (you won't believe what happened on day ten!)
Use as directed


Fun Shoe

My wife and I have dumped our important stuff on a NAS and that's pretty much all I'd like to back up. Given how most places don't want to deal with a NAS at all, I was looking at Spideroak. $99 for 250Gb. Do folks think it's overpriced for what it is?

Furism
Feb 21, 2006

Live long and headbang


People you must understand there's a difference between BackBlaze and BackBlaze B2. B2 is an online storage service, much like Amazon Glacier. You use that service with a third-party software like duplicity, restic or CloudBerry Backup. You pay only for the storage and some actions (reading, writing, etc). The cost is about $0.005 per GB per month (at rest ; that is, transferring the files will cost you a little bit so the first month might be a bit more expensive. They have a calculator online).

They also have a backup software, which uses B2 in the background, but that is a different product.

Furism
Feb 21, 2006

Live long and headbang


Twobirds posted:

My wife and I have dumped our important stuff on a NAS and that's pretty much all I'd like to back up. Given how most places don't want to deal with a NAS at all, I was looking at Spideroak. $99 for 250Gb. Do folks think it's overpriced for what it is?

Uh, yeah. Buy a software that allows you to backup to _any_ online service (CloudBerry is fine for that ; it's free if you don't want compression and encryption - but you do want that, so get the pro version at just $29), backup to B2 or AWS Glacier, and it'll cost you much, much less than $99 per year.

I ran the simulator for you:



($29 + $15) < $99 so I'd use that. Note I do not work for BackBlaze, I just like their service.

MeKeV
Aug 10, 2010


Twobirds posted:

My wife and I have dumped our important stuff on a NAS and that's pretty much all I'd like to back up. Given how most places don't want to deal with a NAS at all, I was looking at Spideroak. $99 for 250Gb. Do folks think it's overpriced for what it is?

I've been using it for years, have been on an unlimited deal they did a few years ago for $129. Was using it as a dropbox replacement, but have also added in general backup now crashplan is going.

I posted a 30% off deal they were doing as a result of the crashplan announcement, somewhere in the last couple of pages. That would get you 1TB for $99. Or the 250GB for $76ish. Still a bit pricier than it used to be, but that is unlimited devices, and syncing between them if you want.

I've no experience on whether it runs on an appliance NAS though, I run it on each machine I use.




e:

MeKeV posted:

While searching about for what I'm going to do post Crashplan I've found out that Spideroak (that I have an unlimited account for anyway, but mostly use for sync and an additional backup set for more important stuff) has point in time restore via the CLI. https://support.spideroak.com/hc/en...h-Point-in-Time

To add to it's client side encryption and fully selective backup including mounted network drives, I might just go all in for backup with it too now.



e: https://spideroak.com/lifeboat-one-crashplan-rescue/

GuyGizmo
Feb 26, 2003

stupid babies need the most attention


You guys may have convinced me to go to with Duplicati + Backblaze B2. Duplicati looks like a great piece of software if it works as well as I'm getting the impression it does, and Backblaze B2 seems very affordable.

Can anyone speak to the resource usage of Duplicati? That was my biggest complaint with Crashplan, and I'm wondering how it compares to Backblaze's desktop client (when no anti-virus is running) or CloudBerry.

edit: Actually that's probably not even that big of a deal either way, since Duplicati is scheduled, and it's perfectly acceptable for my uses to have it run just once a day at like 4 AM or something like that.

GuyGizmo fucked around with this message at Sep 19, 2017 around 18:00

-Dethstryk-
Oct 20, 2000


GuyGizmo posted:

Can anyone speak to the resource usage of Duplicati? That was my biggest complaint with Crashplan, and I'm wondering how it compares to Backblaze's desktop client (when no anti-virus is running) or CloudBerry.

It's absurdly better than Crashplan, but the Home version of Crashplan was always a Java client despite years of promising to get it off Java. I'm impressed with how little overhead Duplicati uses on the multiple setups I have of it now.

Dillbag
Mar 4, 2007



Can I use Duplicati with Sync.com? As a Canadian, I like the idea of my data being stored on a local server and theoretically protected by Canadian privacy laws, but I can't figure out if Sync.com will work as a backend. As far as I can tell it can only point to a local folder as the sync folder.

e. It does not, Sync.com only works with a sync folder like Dropbox

Dillbag fucked around with this message at Sep 21, 2017 around 18:57

GuyGizmo
Feb 26, 2003

stupid babies need the most attention


Dillbag posted:

Can I use Duplicati with Sync.com? As a Canadian, I like the idea of my data being stored on a local server and theoretically protected by Canadian privacy laws, but I can't figure out if Sync.com will work as a backend. As far as I can tell it can only point to a local folder as the sync folder.
I thought that with Duplicati, it encrypts all of your data before it leaves your computer and your encryption key never leaves your computer. So even if someone were to snoop on your data, it's encrypted and your privacy is still protected.

Can anyone confirm if that is true? Is it also the case that things like file names and paths are also encrypted?

-Dethstryk-
Oct 20, 2000


GuyGizmo posted:

I thought that with Duplicati, it encrypts all of your data before it leaves your computer and your encryption key never leaves your computer. So even if someone were to snoop on your data, it's encrypted and your privacy is still protected.

Can anyone confirm if that is true? Is it also the case that things like file names and paths are also encrypted?

This is all correct. Duplicati treats your files as if you can't trust the receiving target at all. Everything is encrypted before it leaves.

GreenBuckanneer
Sep 15, 2007



Furism posted:

Carbonite is poo poo.You can't specify which files you want to backup. They have their own list of acceptable formats (apparently mp3 and flac are not on it) and won't upload anything else outside of that list, even if you tell it to.

https://support.carbonite.com/artic...ded-from-Backup



Javid posted:

I went with backblaze but so far I'm not particularly impressed. The way you choose what to back up is rear end backwards - by default it backs up EVERYTHING on every hard drive connected, minus a few generic system folders and filetypes, and you have to add an exclusion for every. single. folder. you don't want it to back up. I'd much rather point it at the few specific folders I care about than add a billion exceptions so I'm not trying to upload 3 TB of poo poo. The backup client is also a gigantic resource hog and their support's "solution" is to disable your antivirus before every backup.

If there's a different client that can back up to the backblaze storage I'm already paying for and using (so I don't have to run another full backup) I'd love to hear about it.

Yeah, I don't need to back up EVERYTHING, I only need like 1-2 folders and subfolders backed up. I wasn't a fan.

GreenBuckanneer fucked around with this message at Sep 23, 2017 around 13:38

Javid
Oct 21, 2004

My sole partiality is to that delectable spiced meat. Any additional confederation of vegetables shall not compromise the pie as I see it.

GreenBuckanneer posted:

Yeah, I don't need to back up EVERYTHING, I only need like 1-2 folders and subfolders backed up. I wasn't a fan.

This, pretty much. I mostly wanted to back up my folder of photos I've personally taken because those can't really be re-acquired if my drive takes a poo poo. As far as I can tell there's no way to make it not back up files sitting in the root of the drive even if I want to, short of entirely rearranging how I store my own poo poo, which I'm not gonna do.

I sort of get their point about "not having to worry about what gets backed up so we back everything up" but when you have 4 tb of poo poo and a normal residential connection, that doesn't really work.

Dillbag
Mar 4, 2007



GuyGizmo posted:

I thought that with Duplicati, it encrypts all of your data before it leaves your computer and your encryption key never leaves your computer. So even if someone were to snoop on your data, it's encrypted and your privacy is still protected.

Can anyone confirm if that is true? Is it also the case that things like file names and paths are also encrypted?

Ya, like -Dethstryk- posted I know Duplicati encrypts during the archive process. It's 100% a principle thing for me. Not that I would ever expect the US government to put the intelligence community's resources to work decrypting my save games and spank bank, it's just I would prefer to keep my data theoretically subject to the privacy laws of my home country and out of the hands of foreign nationals.

Red_Fred
Oct 21, 2010

Hell Yeah!


Fallen Rib

I'm a Crashplan user so is Duplicati pretty easy to setup? Minimal maintenance?

Fragrag
Aug 3, 2007
The Worst Admin Ever bashes You in the head with his banhammer. It is smashed into the body, an unrecognizable mass! You have been struck down.

I just switched to a Duplicati+BackblazeS2 setup last weekend. It's all pretty straightforward, I had it set up and running in less than an hour.

GuyGizmo
Feb 26, 2003

stupid babies need the most attention


What are people's recommendations for Windows backup software that's just for making local backups? I'm looking for one that can do something similar to Time Machine in macOS, namely:
  • Local backup to an external drive (not cloud backup)
  • Does incremental backups
  • Keeps old versions of files as long as there's enough space on the drive
  • Backups and can restore the entire bootable system as it was at the time of backup, including every partition on my system disk
I've been using the free edition of EaseUS Todo Backup, but after searching around online I don't trust it. People's opinions on it seem to be pretty low across the internet, I'm having it check the integrity of my 2 TB backup and it's been going for 24 hours and it says it has 70 hours left to go which is way too slow, and the one time I've used it to restore my system, it did eventually work, but not until after I tried several different backup points that were all corrupted.

Is my feeling about it on point? If so, what's a good alternative?

skooma512
Feb 8, 2012

You couldn't grok my race car, but you dug the roadside blur.

Fragrag posted:

I just switched to a Duplicati+BackblazeS2 setup last weekend. It's all pretty straightforward, I had it set up and running in less than an hour.

It looks pretty snazzy and close to what Crashplan has.

I want something with versioning, Linux client, multiple PCs, at a price around what crashplan offers. Since B2 doesnít seem to care where the data comes from Iím set. The way I use crashplan now is basically like this anyway, I upload it and it sits there until my HD dies.

Furism
Feb 21, 2006

Live long and headbang


skooma512 posted:

I want something with versioning, Linux client, multiple PCs, at a price around what crashplan offers. Since B2 doesnít seem to care where the data comes from Iím set. The way I use crashplan now is basically like this anyway, I upload it and it sits there until my HD dies.

B2 for sure doesn't care where the files come from. It's just a bunch of blobs for them. It's more the software you use to interact with B2 that you should pick carefully. Duplicati probably supports backup/restoring from different systems (I don't know, I use something else that does) though.

Goonerousity
Sep 25, 2017

aww yeah

Be sure to keep checksums on your files. Checksums can be used to check if files have been modified. PAR2 can be used to build a checksum array and can be used to repair files.

Good thread so far, voted 5

Goonerousity fucked around with this message at Oct 13, 2017 around 22:49

tzirean
May 1, 2007



I'm a total backup novice (used to back up to external HDDs, every single one failed, gave up) who's having a predictable freakout after a fire destroyed an apartment building down the block. To back up my computer and my girlfriend's, is Duplicati + Backblaze B2 still the most viable option or would we only be able to use one computer per Backblaze subscription? How difficult is a total restoration in that case?

Mr.Radar
Nov 5, 2005

You guys aren't going to believe this, but that guy is our games teacher.


Fun Shoe

tzirean posted:

I'm a total backup novice (used to back up to external HDDs, every single one failed, gave up) who's having a predictable freakout after a fire destroyed an apartment building down the block. To back up my computer and my girlfriend's, is Duplicati + Backblaze B2 still the most viable option or would we only be able to use one computer per Backblaze subscription? How difficult is a total restoration in that case?

Backblaze offers two different services: their regular backup service and B2. The regular backup service uses their backup software and has a flat yearly fee (per computer, Windows and MacOS only) for unlimited storage. B2 is a more generic cloud storage service which can be used with your own backup software (like Duplicati) to do backups. B2 charges per-gigabyte on a monthly basis (at a rate of $5/1000 GB/month) for storage and also charges a per-GB fee for downloads ($20/1000 GB transferred). Since you're paying per-GB with B2, Backblaze doesn't restrict how many computers you could use with each account (the 1 computer per account restriction on their backup service seems to mainly exist to keep people from backing up too much data on a single "unlimited" account). Both of their services have an option to send you your data via the mail on a USB drive but B2 charges for the service (their personal backup service will refund you the cost of the drive if you send it back to them).

tzirean
May 1, 2007



Mr.Radar posted:

Backblaze offers two different services: their regular backup service and B2. The regular backup service uses their backup software and has a flat yearly fee (per computer, Windows and MacOS only) for unlimited storage. B2 is a more generic cloud storage service which can be used with your own backup software (like Duplicati) to do backups. B2 charges per-gigabyte on a monthly basis (at a rate of $5/1000 GB/month) for storage and also charges a per-GB fee for downloads ($20/1000 GB transferred). Since you're paying per-GB with B2, Backblaze doesn't restrict how many computers you could use with each account (the 1 computer per account restriction on their backup service seems to mainly exist to keep people from backing up too much data on a single "unlimited" account). Both of their services have an option to send you your data via the mail on a USB drive but B2 charges for the service (their personal backup service will refund you the cost of the drive if you send it back to them).

Interesting, thanks. It might be easier to get two Backblaze subscriptions, actually, as our total data might exceed 2 TB (which would be equivalent to two subscriptions month-to-month and worse than two subscriptions yearly), but I've heard the primary Backblaze service can be frustrating in terms of what gets backed up and what control you have. But, then, there are other reviews that disagree with that, so I guess I'm going to be doing more digging.

GuyGizmo
Feb 26, 2003

stupid babies need the most attention


So I've decided to ditch EaseUS Todo Backup Free / Home edition. I'm going to start my backup over fresh with a different piece of software.

Right now I'm eyeballing Acronis Backup TrueImage since people seem to think it's good. Are there any other good ones I should consider? (Note: this is for local whole-disk backups)

edit: wrong Acronis product

GuyGizmo fucked around with this message at Oct 18, 2017 around 05:39

MeKeV
Aug 10, 2010


I've been using Veeam Free for a while now and have been happy with it.

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His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


eames posted:

Is the free Veeam Windows Backup for Endpoint Agent ok to use or just a bait and switch that will eventually be paid?

It looks nice on paper with features like automatic backup when a USB drive is connected, automatic ejecting after the backup (cryptolocker protection), bare metal restore options, email notifications, etc. I need something that's easy to use for my dad's single-user office and Veeam with two rotated USB drives seems like it'd be pretty hands-off.

I'm after something like this because windows backup sucks but I would also be willing to pay if someone has any recommendations they think are superior.

Windows own software backs up fine to a local HD for our purposes, but ideally we want to backup to both the local drive, and an off-site NAS. The current method is only backing up to the local HD then using a robocopy script to move it to the NAS, but that means backing up a huuge file everytime over the internet. Hence the desire for a backup that could do incremental backups right over the network...

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