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ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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This is a thread where we discuss backups. There are tools and services available for every operating system, for every need, at every price range.

Feel free to ask questions! It doesn't matter if you want to back up your phone pictures or your production database. It all needs a backup.

I may eventually include a list of recommended backup applications here, but there are so many that it'd probably be easier to just post your requirements and ask what fits your needs best.

Why do backups?
Everyone should have a backup in place because failure is inevitable. You will face the loss of data eventually. Maybe a hard drive fails, your building burns down, or your laptop takes a nose dive into a speculum bucket. Without a backup, you’re in trouble.

You should back up any unique data you have, as well as any data that would take too long to replace through some other method if the original data were to go missing. “Too long” is entirely subjective based on your needs.

This means your documents, pictures, and anything of the sort with user-generated content should be backed up. Your movies that took weeks to rip from disk should be backed up. Your business-critical Excel spreadsheet with its Access backend (oh god) should be backed up. Your email server should be backed up. And so on.

But you don't necessarily need to back up something you can download and install in 30 seconds, like Skype.
When in doubt, back it up.

Are there any good practices to follow?
Of course! Other than just having a backup in the first place, there are a few very basic considerations you should have.

First and foremost, If you have only one copy of something, it is not backed up. If you have a single point of failure, your data is not backed up. Your RAID array is still a single point of failure. A CD in a vault is still a single point of failure. Your stuff is not backed up unless at least two copies exist separately. RAID is not backup. RAID is not backup. RAID is not backup.

Beyond that, I feel there are three things every backup plan should consider:

Have an on-site and an off-site backup. Also known as a “hybrid” backup solution, this means you have a backup that is easily accessible and another that is not. This allows for speedy restores for anything short of disaster, and any restore at all if, say, your building burns down.

For your home or small business users, the off-site backup will often be on the cloud. For people/businesses with large data and/or slow connections, off-site backup often means physically taking some form of media to another location.

Keep more than one version. Every backup solution will handle this a bit differently, but the core idea is that you want to keep multiple versions of everything going back some period of time. This allows you to call forth a past version of any/all data to recover from an issue that affects the latest version.

This is especially important these days, thanks to Cryptolocker and other ransomware. A backup solution that doesn't allow you to pick a restore point prior to infection is virtually useless when faced with Cryptolocker.

Test your restores. A backup that you cannot restore is no backup at all. You should, at the very least, know how to do the restore, so you’re able to actually do it when the time comes. If this is business critical data, you should be testing your restores on some regular basis.

Now, go forth and back that data up!

ConfusedUs fucked around with this message at Mar 5, 2015 around 01:07

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ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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To get the ball rolling, I figure I'll post my home backup scheme!

My primary storage for my home is a Synology NAS. All of my laptops/desktops (I have four in my home) back up to the NAS daily. The macs use Time Machine for this.

The NAS itself is backed up to an external harddrive every day and to the cloud once a week.

This gives me three layers of redundancy (NAS + EHD + CLOUD) for all my regular systems, and the NAS itself has two layers (EHD + Cloud).

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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fattredd posted:

What's the most cost-effective way of backing up my junk? The most "valuable" information I have is about a terabyte of movies/shows. How many copies should I have? Is it best stored on an external drive, or in "the cloud"?

I'm taking a shot in the dark and saying that a full on NAS is overboard. What would be reasonable?

Can you replace this stuff easily? Like would it be a pain in the rear end to re-rip everything? I assume it would. I'm also assuming you got this stuff legally and can't just re-torrent it in an afternoon.

If you can't easily replace it, you should follow the best practices up there: get yourself an on-site and an off-site backup with versioning. It could be rotating a couple of harddrives, or cloud based. Cloud is fine if you can upload a TB in a reasonable time frame, since your movies and music won't be changing a lot.

I'd look into something like crashplan.

A NAS could be really nice if you wanted to stream the content to multiple devices simultaneously, but I wouldn't get one JUST for backup.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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AgentCow007 posted:

Wow, great timing!

I am trying to find incremental backup software for Windows so I can roll my workstation back from backups saved on my NAS. This would all be complimenting my CrashPlan backup.

I just bought Acronis True Image 2015 and it appears to be crap... it stops running and won't start again, and I absolutely loathe the Fisher-Price interface. I'm on the verge of getting a refund. Does anyone have a favorite incremental backup/"Time Machine" for Windows? I do dumb stuff, so I need an "undo" button.

Crashplan can save local backups, I believe. I'd just use that.

Crashplan > NAS & Cloud

Edit: Unless you're looking for a complete "image" backup? If so, Acronis is actually one of the best. Carbonite has a "Mirror Image" option also, but it has some pretty steep limitations.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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The Gunslinger posted:

I really dislike Crashplan, numerous times I've encountered between clients due to version differences due to fubar'd upgrades. Becomes an absolute nightmare to troubleshoot, often requiring multiple reinstalls to sync everything back up. This is a problem with auto-update on their end and it continues to surface every now and then, I've seen it happen to a number of clients over the years. They don't seem to bother with official packages for various NAS distros too and the user ones are often broken by changes. The backup inheritance is also confusing for users and I've had a few clients accidentally kill their archive set because of a stupid pop up related to it, often precipitated by a client version mismatch and some other nonsense.

That said I've yet to find anything better for end users but if anyone has a recommendation I would love to check out an alternative.

All of the consumer-level backup applications are more or less the same. Each has its own quirks, limitations, and drawbacks. They all have mostly the same result, and even act mostly the same on the backend. This includes Carbonite, Crashplan, and Backblaze.

So try one of the others and see what you think. Crashplan tends to freak out if your data size is large (over 2TB you're more or less guaranteed to have issues). Carbonite hates large file counts (several million) but size doesn't matter much. I'm not as familiar with Backblaze.

They all cost about the same and all have free trials, so give them a shot and see which works for you. Crashplan is my favorite of the three, but YMMV. Carbonite's support is way better than Crashplan's but their client lacks some of the features.

This is assuming you mean Windows; it's really hard to beat Time Machine for macs. Just do a TM backup and upload that stuff to Glacier or something if you have a Mac.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Peever posted:

Anyone have experience with Amazon Glacier? I currently use Crash Plan as an off site backup but was thinking about adding Glacier since it is so dirt cheap.

Glacier is just cloud storage. You just upload your stuff to it however you want.

The big gotcha is in how long it takes to get stuff back. You can upload any time, but to download you have to request the data and there's a delay of a few hours before it's eligible for download.

It's cheap, but it's not unlimited for one price, like Crashplan or Carbonite.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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jammyozzy posted:

Could you elaborate a little more on what issues are likely? I don't have 2TB of stuff at the moment but my long term plan is to build a NAS and chuck my DVD collection on there amongst other things. Especially if I sign up for the family plan and get my sister involved we'll easily surpass 2TB without much effort.
ny alternatives out there for around the same price I'd be all ears.

My experience both personal and amongst friends/internet buddies is that Crashplan really chokes speed- and stability- wise once you get a lot of data, more than about 2TB or so. There used to be a way to modify some registry keys to allocate more memory to Crashplan, which would usually help. Last I looked (~9 months ago) it was on their website.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Yeah the client

Back-end is pretty solid. No problems that I'm aware of.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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I hate tapes.

I recognize that they have their uses, but I still hate tapes.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Lots of home backup chat in here, which I expected, but we're open to business backup chat too!

I'm pretty knowledgeable about Windows Server backups so if anyone wants to know anything, such as why VSS flips out if you back up the same MSSSQL database with two different applications, just let me know.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Not that I know of.

You could roll your own thing if your systems are on the same network.

Robocopy or rsync could do it for you, if you can script.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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alkanphel posted:

If your NAS is pretty large, for example 10GB, how would you back that up to external HDs?

You have a few choices

1) Use a backup program that allows you to create customized backup sets, and use multiple EHDs.
2) Roll your own backup script (robocopy or rsync, as appropriate), and use multiple EHDs.
3) Invest in a second large array to use as a backup target.
4) Invest in a tape drive.


I prefer #1. Rolling your own backup is perfectly fine, but I dislike maintaining it. #3 is expensive. I hate tapes.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Sheep posted:

Good timing on this. We've got like forty laptops at work that aren't part of the domain and don't have any sort of backup software on them so its just a matter of time before one dies and some user loses all their poo poo because they ignore my warnings to always work on the server via RDP (which IS backed up).

What are some good business options for something like this? Crashplan is the only system I have personal experience with but I'm totally clueless how it works in a business instead of personal setup.

Good luck. If you were on a domain you could force a solution through software deployments and GPOs, but since you're not...

You could invest in something like a crashplan or carbonite sub for each computer, and hope the users don't disable it. Someone probably will.

Or you could make it official policy to work on the server via RDP (or create some network shares, or whatever) and just say "tough poo poo" when things go badly. When, not if.

If it goes badly enough, you can leverage that to get your systems on a goddamned domain so you can prevent the issue.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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SlayVus posted:

What is the best way to back up when you have slow upload speeds? My cable provider sucks for their upload speeds, 50 Mbps down with 4 Mbps up. I really don't have anything sensitive that can't be stored on a flash drive though. Really, I don't have anything sensitive at all. Store all my passwords with last pass, don't have anything like wills or such. All my data is games or TV or movies.

4Mbps isn't terrible. If you have a couple TB, yeah, maybe it'll take a few weeks. But you should be good after that.

(Edit: Crashplan offers a seeding option in the US where you ship them your data on an EHD)

If you really can't do cloud, you can always rotate some externals and physically take one off-site on a regular basis.

ConfusedUs fucked around with this message at Mar 8, 2015 around 06:31

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Farmer Crack-rear end posted:

Looks like these days it's not in the config file any more, you have to open a CLI to change the setting.

But yeah the problem is that the Crashplan client by default only permits itself to use up to a certain amount of RAM, and the bigger your backup set the more RAM it uses. I have a 4TB backup set, and the Crashplan service is currently using just under 2GB of RAM. Code42 appears to recommend setting the maximum to 1GB per 1TB.

That's a truly ridiculous amount of memory, in my opinion.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Hey all, it's World Backup Day!

http://www.worldbackupday.com/en/

Many backup services are offering deals and discounts for their products today, if you've been waiting for something like that.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Farmer Crack-rear end posted:

Who's offering deals and discounts? I'm not seeing any so far.

Backblaze is for sure, for new subs. Carbonite is, but via email campaign I think.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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GuyGizmo posted:

I'm glad this thread is here, since I have a Windows related backup question, and I'm hoping someone here can help me out.

I have a machine running Windows 8.1, and I'm looking for some software to make daily incremental backups of the entire system to an external drive. This means that it backs up the entire Windows installation, all of my programs, and all other data so that when I restore a backup, the computer will boot to the exact state it was in when the backup was made. Preferably it would be able to keep multiple backups on hand from previous days until my backup drive is filled, so if I want to restore to a state from several days or weeks ago, I could do that. And it would be incremental so that it doesn't have to backup everything every time a new backup is made.

Basically, I'm looking for something that's the Windows equivalent of OS X's Time Machine feature, except I don't need hourly backups, nor do I need the superfluous visual effects.

I already tried out EaseUS Todo Backup, since it claimed to do the exact thing I wanted. However, I recently corrupted my system, restored my entire hard drive from its backup, only to find that Windows wouldn't boot. It goes directly into recovery mode, and fails to fix whatever the problem is. I'm still trying to figure out how to fix it and I might need to reinstall Windows completely. Sufficed to say, I'm deeply disappointed in this software because it failed me when I needed it the most.

Does anyone have any suggestions? From all of the googling I'm doing it's looking like there aren't any clear winners for what I want to do. There's a lot of software that backs up data, but isn't necessarily able to restore everything including Windows to a previous state and keep everything booting properly. And there's lots of software for cloning my drive, which I could do if there's no other viable option, but with drive cloning it's not feasible to do that daily, nor can it restore to a state from days past -- there'd only be one backup. And from what I can tell, the backup options supplied by Microsoft are pretty much useless unless you just want to back up the photos you sent to your grandmother or something.

This is the $64,000 question for Windows users.

Frankly, Time Machine is so goddamned good! Everyone who uses it wonders why the hell Windows doesn't have something like that. The answers are quite complicated, but it really comes down to basic platform design and the massive number of possible hardware configurations.

Anyway, you can come close in a couple of different ways.

Imaging/cloning backups like Acronis True Image and Carbon Copy Cloner create an image of the entire drive(s) involved. You can restore those, sometimes over top of your existing Windows install, sometimes to a bare system, and almost always to a second drive. Depending on the program, you can sometimes restore to different hardware too.

System State backups are something that you may run across. When combined with a backup of your entire file system, you can get everything back. All your applications, all your files, everything. Windows Server Backup, NTBackup, and a bazillion third-party apps will back up system state. Big failings here are that you need to have Windows already installed, then you restore this over it. Identical hardware is best, similar usually works, but big differences cause issues, because system state includes device drivers.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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Sheep posted:

FWIW I can't find Backblaze's discounts (if they exist?) and it doesn't look like Crashplan is doing anything.

I had a link earlier, lost it, and now I can only find this

http://www.appsumo.com/backblaze-wo...%3D%3D&bdp=1581

YMMV ?

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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I put this in the OP, but man, file-sync options like Dropbox and OneDrive aren't really backups. They're great for content access but lack crucial functionality you need in a true backup solution.

You should look into a NAS for "everywhere" access and back that up using some service of your choosing.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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stevewm posted:

Didn't notice there was a Backup thread, so I had originally posted this in the Ticket Came in thread....

Anyways...

Anyone have any recommendations for a proper and safe way to backup MS SQL databases off-site/to the cloud?

We have 3 Server 2008 R2 SQL databases, about 67GB in size total. Each database sees 2-5GB of changes per day. Right now we take log backups every hour, and a full backup every night that are stored on removable disks (RDX-like disk cartridges). The full .BAK files as generated by SQL Server are 56GB currently.

My problem is that the sending site has a 10Mbit upload, and only a 6 hour window in which it could be fully utilized. So uploading the .BAK files nightly definitely out of the question.

Does anything exist out there that can perform a safe, off-site backup while only transferring changes/deltas? From what I can find, the general consensus is that the only safe SQL backup is the one generated natively by SQL Server. But .BAK files seem to have so many changes from day to day that it renders delta based solutions (like rsync for example) useless; they end up transferring nearly the entire file again.

The "general consensus" you speak of is a very old school of thought. Sure, 12 years ago, when VSS was new, third-party backup stuff sucked. Today? Nah. There's a dozen applications that can do this for you.

Carbonite Server Backup can do your MSSQL databases (and all sorts of other things), and is the one I'm most familiar with.

It supports Differential (delta) and Incremental (log-based, for FULL or BULK databases) backups, uploads automatically, has throttling you can use to limit it during hours, allows you to schedule at what time you want, etc. It also has compression. Databases typically compress very well--over 80% isn't uncommmon, and over 90% is possible. I wouldn't be at all surprised if your full backups compressed to 10GB or less. Almost certainly under 15GB.

You'll still need to perform a full backup on some regular basis (weekly, monthly, etc) but that's true for any backup process.

The only real gotcha here is that MSSQL itself has a limitation where it doesn't keep track of what is backing it up; only that a backup occurs. If you throw multiple applications at the same database, it'll break your inc/diff backups for one or both until that application performs its next full backup. This is true for any application, but some people don't realize this, and then get pissed when they try to run both during a trial phase.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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stevewm posted:

I kinda figured it that, but really couldn't find much to support it. I am not a DBA by any means. Just the lowly computer janitor responsible for making sure it gets backed up.


I'll look into it definitely. Was already looking at Carbonite anyways to backup workstations at some of our branch locations...


Hmm... well crap. I definitely want to continue to do the local physical backup. But add the online backup as a backup to the backup...

CSB will do local backups also. It can replace the entire system.

Or you can just use it to backup and compress your .bak files if you want.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

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I'd try the extra space.

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Feb 24, 2004

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alanthecat posted:

I've MS SQL Server running on 2008r2 and I'm just using Windows Server Backup. Is this ok?

Bonus: it's on RAID 0. (not my decision)

It'd better than nothing, but I'd look into some way to get some more granular backups somehow. It's often nice to be able to restore just one database to a specific point in time.

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Feb 24, 2004

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havenwaters posted:

I'm curious what do you use to actually backup the windows computers to your NAS. Do you just use Windows 7 Backup/Windows 8 File History or do you use something else. I have some 300 GB of documents and photos from work that would suck to lose and I should probably do more than just copying them over to an external hard-drive once in awhile.

I'm trying to keep this thread company/product agnostic, focusing on best practices, so I didn't name it. And it would be absolute overkill for the average home user, as it's the server-level product I work on.

Anything that backs up to a disk would work in this scenario. Windows backup would be fine. Crashplan would work. Acronis or other imaging software would work. You could do it with robocopy batch script, even.

Seriously, whatever.

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Feb 24, 2004

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wyoak posted:

Is it possible to restore transaction logs on top of a SQL backup made with VSS? As far as I can tell, VSS backups (or maybe just these VSS backups) are only the DB and log files, so I can mount the databases from the restore, but can't restore anything on top of them since they won't be in norecovery

You would probably need to do some command-line work, but I don't know exactly what commands. I'm pretty sure you can apply logs to a database though, if you're in a consistent state without a gap.

Most backup applications worth a drat will just do it for you. Pick your backup to restore, select a time, everything's there as of that time.

Edit: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/li...ror=-2147217396
Looks like restore everything, one at a time, in order, with special flags like NORECOVERY.

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Feb 24, 2004

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teagone posted:

Just to contribute, I have a Plex Media Server I built running Windows 8.1 with a little over 7TB of storage that's currently using DrivePool to orgranize/protect my media. I was looking for a super simple backup solution I could use with my existing setup after I had 2 hard drives crash, and so far the DrivePool app has been pretty solid. It was super easy to set up (for someone like myself who had never looked into back up solutions or even knew what drive pooling was) and it only cost me $20 too.

DrivePool is pretty sweet, but I wouldn't call it a backup solution. It's sort of a weird mix of software RAID and Storage Spaces.

And RAID is not backup!

Had a customer case a year ago where whatever funky drive-spanning thing that DrivePool does was playing hell with one of our products. Caused a lot of files to be backed up twice.

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Feb 24, 2004

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teagone posted:

Hmm, what would you suggest be a good alternative in my case? Cloud backups? I do plan on sticking with DrivePool on my Plex Server for the foreseeable future, but another added layer of protection wouldn't hurt

Local external drives, a NAS, cloud backups, or some combination. You want a separate, independent copy of the data.

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Feb 24, 2004

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So you think it's a good solution when it doesn't cover two of the top three reasons for data loss?

It's good software but come on.

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Feb 24, 2004

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redeyes posted:

I think its a great solution for home users. Top reason for data loss is hard drive crashing, at least around the computers I get to mess with.

Yeah, maybe that's the top reason, but it's certainly not the only reason. Fire, theft, and power-related failures are the other primary reasons.

If only one copy of your data exists, it's not backed up. RAID is not a backup solution for this very reason. DrivePool is no different.

All it does is add some redundancy to address one specific potential cause of data loss. Backup is a catch-all for any problem.

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Shaocaholica posted:

Looking for a recommendation for a backup service, preferably unlimited. I have many many computas but mostly work with 3. I like backblaze but I'm not sure if its worth the cost to scale to ~3 machines. I mostly have photos and video to backup which make up the biggest share. I don't care about full OS/App backups. The rest of my files are small project files. In all right now less than 2T although that could explode to 4T in the next 18 months. Thing is each of my machines has a different purpose so my main photo machine would have all the photos, my laptop would have misc small files and my 2nd desktop might have projects.

Unrelated but I keep reading 'examples' of people storing ripped movies to these services. Why would you do that? Not for legal reasons but a movie to me is easily replaceable data that takes up a lot of space.

Get a NAS. Back up all of the machines to the NAS.

Get one subscription to one provider of your choice, and back up the NAS to it.

This is what I do.

People back up their rippedmovies because it's often easier to just re-download them from your backup provider than it is to re-rip. Assuming you didn't just sell the disk when you were done.

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Feb 24, 2004

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Shaocaholica posted:

So...is there any way to have a backup service run on my NAS as opposed to running on a PC with the NAS mounted?

Synology NAS devices have both Crashplan and Amazon Glacier packages available.

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Feb 24, 2004

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alkanphel posted:

I assume you partition the NAS for each machine to backup to? Would you still need to backup the NAS physically, besides to the cloud?

I just have a separate folder for each machine on mine. So my wife's macbook air goes to one folder, my macbook pro to another, and my son's PC to a third folder.

I do back up my NAS locally, to an external HDD, because there's a lot of stuff that only exists on it. All my music, pictures, and other media are on the thing. It's not just a backup drive for me.

I do exclude the backup folders from that backup, though. No point in backing up the backups.

So my setup looks like this

Endpoints > folders on NAS
NAS (excluding backup folders) > external HDD
NAS (everything) > Cloud

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Shaocaholica posted:

How are you personally doing this step?

My NAS is a Synology and I've used both the Crashplan and Amazon Glacier packages. Both work fine.

Currently I use a server-level product that I work on--it's free for me, so why not? But totally overkill for normal use.

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Shaocaholica posted:

So what did people do before online backup services became mainstream? Backup to external and pray the house doesn't burn down? Keep an external offsite and rotate every so often? Backup to optical media?

Tapes.

I wouldn't trust a used mechanical hdd. Nor do most people. There's not much of a market there.

It's one of those things that you're better off just buying new.

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Feb 24, 2004

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Shaocaholica posted:

I meant home enthusiasts. Or did that crowd use tapes?

Oh, home users, if they backed up at all (most didn't) it was usually with external hdds, or CDs, or DVDs.

The cloud age has really brought backup to the home market.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!


brylcreem posted:

I (re)read the OP, but there's nothing about those options in there?

I use Spideroak with 1TB of space to back up (sync?) all my user-generated data (My Documents, Pictures, Videos, porn). What's the trouble with that?

(p.s. no, I don't make my own porn!)

Wow, you're right. I know I wrote up something, but I must have somehow left it out.

I'll add it back to the OP soon, but the biggest part of it is that most (all?) of these services don't have mass restore options to previous versions. The line between file sync and backup is getting increasingly blurry, but that one thing is a big differentiator.

Sync services great if you need to pull down a few files or the latest version of everything, but you're screwed if you get something that trashes a large segment of your stuff or, worse, something like Cryptolocker that requires a mass restore to a previous version of mostly everything.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!


Flipperwaldt posted:

Saw someone link Veeam Endpoint Backup in another thread here in SH/SC and it looks pretty good.

From looking here it seems to have that ol' Time Machine thing going where you can jump back to several different points in the past.

Question is, is it any good? Anyone know? They want me to make an account to download it, I want to know if it's worth bothering.


I dread switching over to yet another one though. I actually have several old Acronis Images lying around, as wel as Clonezilla and Macrium Reflect ones. Nothing important, but, poo poo, someone should write a conversion tool.

I've not (yet) had the opportunity to use their Endpoint backup, but their VM backups are amazing.

ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!


DrBouvenstein posted:

Oddly enough, I just came into here to complain about Veeam!

To be fair, it's an issue that has since been fixed, but one of our clients is on Veeam Backup 6.5, and it has a peculiar little quirk...it can't restore files/folders if the path name is over 260 characters.

I had to do a restore today for that client and the folder they needed restored had layers upon layers of sub-folders, so almost half of the files couldn't be restored natively in Veeam.

Thankfully, there is a workaround, since the FLR mounts the VMDK being restored from as a local temp folder, so I could just use Robocopy to get them where I needed...still a pain in my butt, though.

That's actually a really common problem on Windows systems. Blame MS for making a maximum path length way back in the day, and preserving it for backwards compatibility reasons to this day. This isn't an issue unique to Veeam.

This is a pretty complex topic once you start digging into the technical stuff. I think the max path length for NTFS is actually like 32k characters, and there are ways for applications to allow lengths like that through various APIs.

But what happens if Program-A puts a long path object somewhere, and then Program-B doesn't know how to deal with it? What if Program-C uses a completely different method and doesn't understand Program-A's stuff?

So in short, there are ways around the max path length, but they kinda get flaky when you start interacting with other functions/programs that don't use those workarounds or use different ones entirely. Many applications just honor the max path length to avoid the headache.

I don't really have a lot of advice here except, maybe, reconsider your folder structures if they're long enough for this to cause you problems on a regular basis. You might also be able to set up some symlinks using the 'subst' command. Like linking C:\Some\Crazy\long\path to X:\

ConfusedUs fucked around with this message at Apr 28, 2015 around 20:04

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ConfusedUs
Feb 24, 2004

Bees?
You want fucking bees?
Here you go!
ROLL INITIATIVE!!


Acer Pilot posted:

I'm thinking about getting a Dropbox Pro account. Any negatives aside from the 30 day only file history? Are there ways to prevent accidentally pushing corrupted files?

It'll push any changes. It can't differentiate changes of one type from another.

Make sure you can restore folders or groups of files to a past version. Last time I tried, you could only restore to the latest; everything else was one at a time.

Fine if you deleted a spreadsheet. Sucks if you get Crypto viruses. This is why Dropbox isn't a true backup solution.

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