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Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.




“I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath. Do your research.”

Welcome to Sherlock Holmes: Consulting Detective.

How does the game work?

The man Sherlock himself will be giving the players a case that he has no time for, leaving the players to find not only whodunit, but also howdunit and, occasionally, what have they dun. Then they get lectured by Holmes, who solves the case without leaving his sitting room, while the players feel stupid and hate the smug bastard.

The game is a glorified mystery CYOA, with each “section” in the case book representing a witness, a location to investigate or what have you. The writing is generally good, and the cases are structured in a way that further investigation will make the players end with more suspects, more motives and more smoking guns, not less, so wandering around until you read the entire booklet isn’t going to work. You’re going to think, rather than stumble upon the answer.

After the players decide that they have cracked the case (or given up in shame), we go to the parlor scene, where Sherlock explains the case and test the players not only in matters related directly to the case but in other interesting, but secondary, tidbits. Each correct answer raises the player’s score and each unnecessary location the players go to decreases it, so wandering around is necessary, but discouraged. 100 points is the gold standard of Sherlock-Level.

I scored -50 on my first case

Here, have a map of London to draw attention away from my shame. I'll be marking important locations on it as we progress. Who knows, maybe it will be useful.



No, how does the PbP work?

I’ll write a section of the booklet (or Sherlock giving the intro of the case,if needed) and give the players 48-ish hours to discuss and decide what to do (interrogate the first on scene, go to the Morgue, contact the lover of the victim, whatever). If the players agree on a course of action early I’ll speed up the process. Once the players know (or think they know) what happened, I’ll post the testing questions (who, how, why? How did the criminal enter a perfectly sealed box in the depths of the Pacific ocean? Where did the monkey hide? ) and the players will give their answers. Then Sherlock will rate the players and be a dick about it.

If the players get stuck, they may request lurker collaboration, but otherwise DO NOT HELP THE PLAYERS IF YOU ARE LURKING, please.

I want to play!

I'm looking for 3 players to run the first case. I have the feeling that 2 may get stuck too often and are too few to get a conversation going. 4 may make the game too easy (the game box says "up to 7". Investigating by committee). The number will be revised on future cases, if there is enough interest to keep going. If you want to join, post ##Sherlock Holmes? Bit of a git, innit?. The Supreme Court kinda claimed a spot, so he's got one if he's still interested. Otherwise, random chance gets it.

Probably unnecessary warning Playing or reading the thread will bloody ruin the game for you Do not read if you intend to buy the game afterwards, unless you want to cheat. Please do not cheat in order to make you seem smart, you lonely internet person.

Also probably unnecessary, but if you'r lurking try not to give hints to the players. I'll happily discuss the current case by PM or gmail (safatsamurai) if you want.

EDIT: Go me, great thread tag.

Fat Samurai fucked around with this message at Mar 22, 2015 around 09:50

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Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.


Holmes Lecture

CASE 1: The Murdered Munitions Magnate

The London Times

Case introduction
Investigatingthe crime scene
Visiting the Morgue.

LOCATIONS OF INTEREST FOR CASE 1



Usual contacts, in white:

  • 1 - Sir Jasper Meeks, Chief Medical Examiner - Head coroner at St. Bartholomew hospital.
  • 2 - H.R. Murray, Criminologist - Criminologist. He analizes all items and substances discovered during the course of investigations.
  • 3 - Scotland Yard - Police (Lestrade and Gregson). They have all reports and elements relative to the investigation.
  • 4 - Disraeli O'Brian - Archivist at the National Archive Office. Compiles old legal and criminal documents.
  • 5 - Somerset House - Archives of the births, deaths, marriages and wills which may be freely consulted.
  • 6 - Edward Hall - Barrister at Old Bailey's tribunal. Source of information on trials and legal affairs.
  • 7 - Porky Shinwell - Owner of the Raven and the Rat tavern. Source of information for all illegal affairsand on all criminals.
  • 8 - Fred Porlock - Member of the criminal underground. Leaves coded information on the activities of Moriarty at the Parsons & Sons toy shop.
  • 9 - Henry Ellis - Reporter, London Times. Source of information on current events, especially on foreign affairs.
  • 10 - Quintin Hogg - Journalist at the Police Gazette. Source of information on criminal affairs.
  • 11 - Mycroft Holmes - "Eminence grise". Source of information on everything that concerns the government.
  • 12 - Langdale Pike - Society Columnist. Knows all the gossip currently stirring in the good London society.
  • 13 - Central Carriage Stables - Meeting point of London Cab Drivers. Source of information on the movement of suspects.
  • 14 - Lomax - Librarian at the London Library. To be consulted for all enciclopedic research.
  • 15 - Sherlock Holmes - Consulting Detective. If you're stuck, Sherlock will pu you back on track with some good advice.

Related to the case, in red:

  • 1 - Grant Arms Co (crime scene)

Fat Samurai fucked around with this message at Mar 26, 2015 around 21:05

bowmore
Oct 6, 2008




Lipstick Apathy

I'm keen.

bowmore
Oct 6, 2008




Lipstick Apathy

##Sherlock Holmes? Bit of a git, innit?

bobvonunheil
Mar 18, 2007


Sherlock Holmes, Insulting Detective.

I won't be playing along as I've done the first three cases already but good luck! It's totally worth it.

Chekans 3 16
Jan 2, 2012

No Resetti.
No Continues.




Grimey Drawer

##Sherlock Holmes? Bit of a git, innit?

I get bored at work easily and have never heard of this game, so why not?

Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.


bobvonunheil posted:

Sherlock Holmes, Insulting Detective.

I've been watching Cumberbatch's series AND consistently accusing wrong people in the game. Sherlock is a jerk.

zandert33
Sep 20, 2002



If there is still an empty spot I'm game

##Sherlock Holmes? Bit of a git, innit?

The Supreme Court
Feb 25, 2010

Pirate World: Nearly done!

I'd still like to give this a shot!

##Sherlock Holmes? Bit of a git, innit?

bowmore
Oct 6, 2008




Lipstick Apathy

We have 4 now I think

Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.


bowmore posted:

We have 4 now I think

Bah, let's do it with 4. That will be my excuse when you guys crack the case in two seconds while I failed miserably.

I have just noticed that the pdf scans of the day's newspaper that comes with every case are from the 1981 version, and are pretty different from what I have. I'll try to scan them tomorrow at the office, and hope people don't look at me weird. For now, have the introductory lesson from Sherlock. Both this and the introductions to the cases are pretty wordy, but the investigations sections are mostly 3-4 paragraphs long.

The game starts in 24 hour-ish

Baker Street Irregulars

Bowmore
zandert33
The Supreme Court
Chekans 3 16

HOLMES LECTURE

Found among Watson's papers were notes from an 1886 lecture given by Holmes to Wigins and other members of the Baker Street Irregulars. The lecture covers Holmes' view of London and the many personalities who were of help to Holmes and would be of help to the Baker Street Irregulars. We have reconstructed this lecture for your edification. When yo pick up a Case and try to solve one of the mysteries within, keep in mind Holmes' lecture which introduces many resources for you to use.

Whenever Holmes mentions a set of coordinates (for example Bart's is 38 EC), it means that the players can turn to that section in the case book and read the outcome of their investigation. You can mostly ignore them, but I will post an updated map of London, because sometimes distance will be an important factor to prove an alibi.


Holmes stood next to a map of London which hung on the wall of the sitting room at 221 B Baker Street. Watson intermittently surveyed the scene over the pages of his book, while Holmes paced back and forth in front of a group of attentive youths, his black brier in his right hand, his left in the pocket of his mouse-coloured dressing gown.

"London is not a beautiful city,” began Holmes. "Under the soot that covers its buildings is the residue of the Empire, a teeming mass of four million souls trying to survive, mostly off of each other. Behind this assemblage is a force of evil, a legion of scoundrels weaving their web of iniquity over the city, and in the centre of the web is the master criminal himself, Professor James Moriarty, the greatest schemer of all time, the organizer of every deviltry, the controlling brain of the underworld—a brain which might have made or marred the destiny of nations. That’s the man! But so aloof is he from criticism, so admirable in his management and self-effacement that his true character is unknown to the public and police. This fact must be kept in mind in all your investigations.''

"How has he managed to stay so unknown, Mr. Holmes?”

“That is a good question, Wiggins. Moriarty insulates himself from the crimes he controls and the public with an organization of underlings and thugs who make sure that no thread of evidence can be traced to Moriarty. So you can see that we are not dealing with the ordinary criminal mind and we will need all the help we can get.

“Today we will discuss some of the people who will be of help to you in your investigations. At the start of any investigation you must keep in mind that it is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. The people that I will introduce you to at this time will help you collect the facts.

Our first stop will be St. Batholomew’s Hospital or Bart’s." Holmes pointed to 38 EC on the map with the tip of his pipe. “Bart’s is one of the oldest and greatest of London’s hospitals and is one of the medical schools of the London University College. Located here is the office of the Coroner’s Chief Medical Examiner, Sir Jasper Meeks. He is London’s greatest forensic pathologist You can depend on him for all the technical details that can be obtained from a corpus delecti.”

“Will the bodies of murder victims always be taken to Bart’s, Mr. Holmes?’’

“Yes, Wiggins. All deaths that have questionable causes must be examined by the Chief Medical Examiner.

“Our next stop is the Scotland Yard Criminology Laboratory, located at 22 Regency-street, SW. Here we meet H.R. Murray, Head Chemist. It is rumoured that Murray lives in the lab; any time of day or night you will find him bent over one of his tables trying to extract the history of a crime from the physical evidence available to him. You can learn much from old H.R. if you can follow the twists and jumps of his thinking; there is no better mind when it comes to interpreting the physical evidence from a crime.

"Wouldn’t it be easier just to go to Scotland Yard, Mr Holmes?” asked Wiggins.

A smile came over Holmes’ face as he lowered himself into the wicker chair. “Yes, let’s talk about Scotland Yard. If the Yard would read the reports or knew how to look at the evidence, then there would be no need for our services. Yes, they will get the reports and sometimes they may even read them, but that doesn’t mean that they will know how to interpret them. Gregson and Lestrade are the pick of a bad lot, but you will find that they often twist the facts to fit their preconceived theories. But you are right, Wiggins, Scotland Yard, at 13 SW, is a very valuable source of information. The professional police have methods for gathering facts and information that are not open to us.

“At this time I would like to mention another invaluable source of information, The Office of Records at number 14 Chancery-lane, WC. This huge fireproof Tudor-style edifice contains legal records, both criminal and civil, as well as state-papers. Your contact there is Disraeli O’Brian, Head Clerk of the Land Records Department, whom you will find a walking, or should I say sitting, encyclopaedia of the office’s affairs over the last thirty years.

“Another records office you should know about is Somerset House on the south side of the Strand at 17 WC. The Office of the Registrar-General of Births, Deaths, and Marriages and the Probate Registry are located there. You will also find the Commons Will Office which is a great repository of testamentary writings of all kinds.”

“Who should we contact at Somerset House?” asked Simpson.

“The records are open to the public so you will need no special contact.”

Holmes rose from his chair and stood facing the map while lighting his pipe. When it was started he turned again to his audience and resumed his lecture, “Let's talk a little about the courts. We will have little to do with the official law enforcement establishment, but it is a source of information. The Criminal Court, or “Old Bailey” is located at 36 Old Bailey, EC, and should be kept in mind when dealings with known criminals are concerned. You can pick up a lot of information hanging around Old Bailey.

“When I was studying at Bart’s, I would run across to Old Bailey and watch the trials of the day in progress. It was seeing the unimaginative nature of our criminal and legal classes that made up my mind to become a consulting detective. Small cases that show some degree of imagination and challenge are more rewarding than the large crimes that lack anything new.

“There is one young barrister, Edward Hall, whom you will find most days at Old Bailey, who is a cut above the other unimaginative members of his profession. You will find him of assistance.”

“Mr. Holmes!”

"Yes, Simpson?”

"Could you tell me the difference between a barrister and a solicitor?”

"Yes, of course. A solicitor handles the routine legal business of our society. If you do not have to go before a court, then you will have no need for a barrister. If you must go before a court, then your solicitor would engage the services of a barrister. A barrister is a member of the highest class of lawyers who have the exclusive right to plead in superior courts. The particular business of the barrister is the advocacy of causes in open court and, except in criminal cases, he may not undertake a case without the intervention of a solicitor who actually prepares the case for trial.

"This would be a good time to talk about the Inns of Court. Here on the map you will see Grey's Inn, 10 WC, Lincoln's Inn, 13 WC and The Temple, 33 EC. These four great Inns of Court—the Temple is divided into two Inns, the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple—are incorporations for the study of law possessing the exclusive privelege of calling barristers to the Bar. All barristers must belong to one of the four Inns. The Inns contain dining halls, libraries, offices and living quarters for barristers and law students.

“Now that we have looked at the top of the legal society let’s lower our sights a little and look at some other resources available to us. The first is Porky Shinwell."

“I must say, Holmes, you would have to lower your sights a great deal to find Porky Shinwell." Watson laid his book down on his lap and looked up at Holmes for the first time.

“It all depends on where one keeps one’s eyes, my dear Watson. Porky is not a pillar of society, I dare say. But he is a man who has learned from his mistakes and is trying to start a new life on the right side of the law. He has been of great help to us in the past as I expect he will be again in the future. Shinwell Johnson, known as Porky, after two terms at Parkhurst has given up his life of crime for that of innkeeper. He is now the proprietor of the Raven and Rat Inn, 52 Hall-street, EC.

“Whose patrons once filled Parkhurst, Millbank and every other prison in the Empire,” interjected Watson before returning to his book.

“Right, Watson, But what better patrons could you have to keep an ear on the underworld of London. You can always get a case, or help on a case, from Porky Shinwell.

“Speaking of the underworld we should mention Fred Porlock. ‘Fred Porlock’ is the assumed name of a member of Moriarty’s criminal organization who has been of immense help on a number of occasions, I don’t know who he is or why he informs on his master, it is enough to know that he does. He communicates with me by post or by leaving a message, usually in code, at Parsons and Sons Toy Shoppe, 18 Shaftesbury Avenue, NW.”

"A toy shop?"

"Yes, at times Porlock’s sense of humour shows through. "Now for one of the most valuable sources of information available to you, the newspapers. Approximately 570 newspapers are published in London and its environs. As you know, I have filled one of the upstairs lumber-rooms with back issues of newspapers and I consult them regularly. The press is a most valuable institution, if you only know how to use it. I read nothing but the criminal news and the agony column. You will find the agony columns are most instructive, and the private consulting detective will not want for work so long as they exist.”

"But aren’t most of the things found in those columns insignificant, Mr. Holmes?”

"Insignificant? Perhaps, Mr. Simpson, perhaps. But it has been more important to me to choose a case for its uniqueness and interest than for its significance. The strangest and most unique things are very often connected not with the larger but with the smaller crimes, and occasionally, indeed, where there is reason to doubt whether am positive crime has been committed. One of the reasons I am training you in the art of detection is to enable you to take over part of my case load.

Remember, the more information you get out of the newspapers the more time you will save in solving your case. "I have also found two reporters to be of assistance from time to time. They are Henry Ellis of The Times and Quincin Hogg of the Police Gazette.

"Mr. Ellis is the foreign news editor and is a great reservoir of information of what's happening on the continent. He also has an interest in crime news and is always happy to help when he can, but you must be careful of what you tell him or you might find what you confided to him in the next day’s Times. He can be found at his office at 30 EC.

"Quintin Hogg is crime reporter for the Police Gazette. He is an ex-police inspector who found the environment of Scotland Yard less than stimulating. He is a good reporter with a strong deductive mind. A very good resource to keep in mind. His address is 35 EC.

"Any questions?"

“Don’t you think you should mention your brother Mycroft?" asked Watson. "After all, he has been of great help to you in the past, Holmes."

“I would rather think that I have been of great help to him, my dear Watson. But you are right, I should tell them something of my brother. He is a great resource when it comes to information about the government.”

“He is the government," said Watson, imitating Holmes’ manner of speaking, which presented the young men seated in front of Holmes the challenge of trying to conceal their mirth.

"Yes, Watson, I have made that statement in regards to my brother,” answered Holmes, less than amused. "He has an extraordinary faculty for figures, and audits the books in some of the government departments. Mycroft lodges in Pall Mall, and he walks round the corner into Whitehall every morning and back every evening. From year’s end to year’s end he takes no other exercise and is seen nowhere else, except only in the Diogenes Club, which is just opposite his rooms. If you ever need his help, you will find him available at the Diogenes Club at 8 Pall Mall, SW.

Another person I would like to mention is Langdale Pike, a person who usually gets in the last word. He’s a human reference work on social scandal, especially of the London scene. He contributes bits of gossip to the 'garbage papers' that cater to an inquisitive public. His working hours are spent at the Societies Club at 2 St James, SW.

“What about the Central Carriage Stables, Mr. Holmes?” asked Wiggins. “I’ve always had good luck getting information there.”

"That’s a good one, Wiggins. The Central Carriage Stables is located at 5 Grey's Inn-road, WC. It is at this location that all of London's cabs are stabled and despatched. I have gotten much valuable information on people's movements by talking to the cab drivers. A good one, Wiggins, a good one.”

Holmes again set himself down in his wicker chair. “I guess that is enough for today. Can you think of anything I missed, Watson?”

“What about Lomax at the London Library?”

"Yes, he can be of value. Lomax is a wealth of information and can find anything you need on the full shelves of this great library.

"I think that is enough for today, but I must tell you again that it is of the highest importance in the art of detection to be able to recognize, out of a number of facts, which are incidental and which are vital. Otherwise your energy and attention must be dissipated instead of being concentrated.

"Well, gentlemen, if you will move over to the table, I will ring Mrs Hudson and have her bring up some tea and biscuits.”

"Thank you, Mr. Holmes.”

“My pleasure", responded Holmes. “I am sure we will soon be able to put your talents to work.”

List of useful contacts

The tl;dr of the lecture. Assume all these locations will be available to visit in any given case. Of course, that doesn't mean that they will all have interesting things to say. Asking a coroner in a case of theft without violence isn't going to help much. Here's a map with their locations, in case it ever becomes important:



  • 1 - Sir Jasper Meeks, Chief Medical Examiner - Head coroner at St. Bartholomew hospital.
  • 2 - H.R. Murray, Criminologist - Criminologist. He analizes all items and substances discovered during the course of investigations.
  • 3 - Scotland Yard - Police (Lestrade and Gregson). They have all reports and elements relative to the investigation.
  • 4 - Disraeli O'Brian - Archivist at the National Archive Office. Compiles old legal and criminal documents.
  • 5 - Somerset House - Archives of the births, deaths, marriages and wills which may be freely consulted.
  • 6 - Edward Hall - Barrister at Old Bailey's tribunal. Source of information on trials and legal affairs.
  • 7 - Porky Shinwell - Owner of the Raven and the Rat tavern. Source of information for all illegal affairsand on all criminals.
  • 8 - Fred Porlock - Member of the criminal underground. Leaves coded information on the activities of Moriarty at the Parsons & Sons toy shop.
  • 9 - Henry Ellis - Reporter, London Times. Source of information on current events, especially on foreign affairs.
  • 10 - Quintin Hogg - Journalist at the Police Gazette. Source of information on criminal affairs.
  • 11 - Mycroft Holmes - "Eminence grise". Source of information on everything that concerns the government.
  • 12 - Langdale Pike - Society Columnist. Knows all the gossip currently stirring in the good London society.
  • 13 - Central Carriage Stables - Meeting point of London Cab Drivers. Source of information on the movement of suspects.
  • 14 - Lomax - Librarian at the London Library. To be consulted for all enciclopedic research.
  • 15 - Sherlock Holmes - Consulting Detective. If you're stuck, Sherlock will pu you back on track with some good advice.

Fat Samurai fucked around with this message at Mar 23, 2015 around 14:19

Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.


Fat Samurai posted:

The game starts in 24 hour-ish

Obviously I meant "the game will start as soon as I get bored at work". There’s another wall of text incoming, but this one is important and doesn’t have a tl;dr.

Get used to aliterations, by the way.

CASE 1
THE CASE OF THE MURDERED MUNITIONS MAGNATE
12 March 1.888


Case introduction posted:

Despite the lateness of the month, March is still roaring like a lion. In fact, just as we alight from our cab in front of 221B Baker, a derby hat skitters by propelled by the fierce wind. In close pursuit is none other than Wiggins, chief of the Baker Street Irregulars and. after Dr. Watson, Sherlock Holmes' most able assistant. Before we can join in the chase, Wiggins manages to halt the flying bit of finery with a deft stroke of his umbrella. Cramming it squarely on his head, he saunters back towards us.

“Hello,” he says cheerily. “It would appear that Mr. Holmes is summoning the troops. Shall we?"

With the point of his umbrella, a very versatile tool it appears, Wiggins stabs the doorbell. It is several moments before Mrs. Hudson answers. After a brief exchange of greetings, she sends us on our way to Holmes' apartment.

Above, we find Holmes and Dr. Watson sitting at a table engaged in earnest conversation with a gentleman in his late forties, expensively dressed yet somewhat rumpled in appearance.

“Warm yourselves" says Holmes, “and I will explain my reasons for calling you out on such a bitter morning.”

Coats and hats are immediately shed—there is a distinct ‘pop’ as Wiggins removes his derby—and a rush is made for the fireplace. In due course introductions are made, and the gentleman is identified as Mr. Richard Allen, brother of the late Courtney Allen, president of the Grant Arms Company.

“It is the recent death of Mr. Allen’s late brother,” says Holmes, “that occasions his visit to us. Briefly, Courtney Allen was found shot to death in an alley behind his office on the evening of March 9th at approximately 7:00 p.m. by the constable on patrol. Scotland Yard has put the crime down as a simple robbery ‘by person or persons unknown,’ largely due to the fact that the victim’s wallet was found empty near the body and his gold pocket watch was missing. Mr. Allen was just telling us a bit about his brother when you arrived. Please continue, Mr. Allen.”

“Well, Courtney was a dynamic individual. Always busy, forever on the move. Yet he had the unique ability to make ten minutes spent with you seem like an hour, so complete was his attention to you. Of course, his charm worked like a magic potion on the ladies.”

“You said he was married?” asks Watson with a raised eyebrow,

“Oh, yes... poor Beatrice.”

“Was he involved in an, ah, in an affair at the time of his death?” asks Wiggins.

“Yes, I believe he was, but I have no clue as to who the lady might have been. You see, the night before he was killed, I popped ’round to his office at about half-past five and managed to coax him to supper at Keen’s. We were there but a short while when Courtney begged leave. He indicated that he had an important meeting, said ‘Auf Wiedersehen,’ and winked. That wink meant a woman.”

"Is the company financially sound?” asks Watson.

“Oh, quite. A fine investment for anyone’s portfolio. You see, the company was founded as a small gun shop some seventy-odd years ago by our great-uncle Thaddeus Grant. It catered to a very elite clientele.”

“Most of the chaps in the regiment were equipped with pistols from Grant’s,” nods Watson. ”Why, Braxton—you’ve heard me speak of Braxton, Holmes—he had a pair of the finest duelling pistols—”

“Yes, Watson. Pray continue, Mr. Allen.”

“Courtney, always fascinated by firearms, apprenticed himself to Uncte Thaddeus. When Thaddeus died in 1873, he bequeathed the business to Courtney. While maintaining the original shop and its tradition, Courtney expanded into the international arms trade. With loans and the sale of public stock, he was able to build a plant at 12 Deverell-street for the manufacture of heavy ordinance. Today the firm is debt-free and very profitable. Of course, a drop in the share price occurred with the news of my brother's death.”

“Who has ascended to the presidency?” asks Watson.

“Courtney’s picked successor, Phillip Marlowe, the 2nd vice-president.”

“And why not the senior vice-president?”

“Young Lord Ragland, who runs the Deverell-street plant is a brilliant technician but a most inept businessman.’’

“Who inherits your brother’s stock?”

“His wife, Beatrice.”

“Now I think we might examine the effects found with your brother.” So saying, Holmes turns his attention to a briefcase and a large, brown envelope.

“It looks as if some sharp object has been used on it,” comments Watson, referring to a long gouge on the leather of the briefcase.

“Yes, and it’s practically brand-new. I gave it to Courtney for his last birthday, January 6th. As you can see, it is locked. The police found it that way. Courtney kept the key on a chain attached to his watch fob. The watch, of course, was stolen.

Holmes retrieves a long piece of wire from the coal scuttle. After gaining Allen’s permission, he inserts it into the lock and, with a quick flick of the wrist, springs the lock open.

He pulls out several folders for our examination. Each is filled with company papers and is coded to indicate its contents. One marked ML-C, for instance, concerns various coal mine leases. Another, marked S-87-R, contains a listing of sales to the Russian Government during the preceding year. One folder is empty. It is marked SP#10-A.

Holmes then empties the contents of the envelope onto the table. The inventory includes: spectacles and case, a ruby ring, a gold wedding band, a key chain with keys, an empty wallet, a small notebook and a note which reads: “SP 10: Spaniard. Tonight 10 PM" And it's signed A.M. As he takes the notebook, a small piece of paper falls out. It's a receipt from Clarcke&Sons, a hatter in Chelsea. It reads "1 Victoria hat. 10 pounds."

Seizing on the notebook. Holmes observes, “There are two entries on the day of your brother’s death. ‘Capt. Egan — 8:30 p.m!!' Can you tell us who Captain Egan might be, Mr. Allen?”

“I've never heard the name.”

The other entry is, ’Plant — 8 a.m. — surprise!’... The previous day’s entry is 'Bishop's F — 8:50 p.m.’ and a notation that it's 'Billy's Mother's Birthday.'" "'Billy' is Courtney's secretary, William Linhart."

Holmes compares the writing in the notebook with that of the note. They appear to be identical. He nods and says, “I believe we have enough to begin our investigation."

After Allen has gone, Wiggins comments that his hand gestures were most intriguing. "Combining infinite subtlety with tremendous force, it is easy to imagine that he has no trouble making his wishes known on the floor of the London Stock Exchange."

“I don't recall Allen giving out his occupation," says Watson, puzzled.

"No," replies Wiggins, “but certain phrases he spoke, coupled with the penciled notations on his left shirt cuff, stock prices surely, led me to conclude that he was a stockbroker."

“Bravo, Wiggins! Well, Watson, our young man has come a long way since the days when you described him as ‘a dirty, little street arab' eh?”

“Thank you, Mr. Holmes, but, after all, I was taught by the master."

"True," says Holmes matter-of-factly. “Quite true."


So, where do you want to go now?

Obvious places to start would be the coroner or the scene of the crime, but you can go anywhere you drat well please. Remember that you're being graded not only on solving the case, but also on how many places you visit, and following false leads counts against your score. I'll add locations to the map as you go there or as you ask about them.

Also, feel free to ignore Holmes' usual way of working and start crafting theories that you can bend the facts around. That has worked for me perfectly well in all the cases.

No, I'm not bitter. Why do you say that?

I'll get the newspaper sorted out later today.

Fat Samurai fucked around with this message at Mar 24, 2015 around 13:37

Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.


Aaaannd triple posting to make sure people notice: Here's today's paper

blackmongoose
Mar 31, 2011

DARK INFERNO ROOK!


I caught that Colonel Moran is taking part in the shooting competition. I didn't see any other Holmes Easter Eggs in the paper, but there could be more. The retraction at the bottom right of pg. 1 is also amusing.

bowmore
Oct 6, 2008




Lipstick Apathy

We should probably go to the scene of the crime right? that's what most detectives do

Chekans 3 16
Jan 2, 2012

No Resetti.
No Continues.




Grimey Drawer

Sounds good to me. Anyone notice anything in the newspaper?

The Supreme Court
Feb 25, 2010

Pirate World: Nearly done!

Scene of the crime sounds like a good start.

bowmore
Oct 6, 2008




Lipstick Apathy

Go to the scene of the crime

Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.


A minor point: During the presentation of the case, I shamelessly lifted the text from another PdP and didn't proofread it correctly.

Here's the paragraph I edited into the post:

Fat Samurai is a baddie posted:

Holmes then empties the contents of the envelope onto the table. The inventory includes: spectacles and case, a ruby ring, a gold wedding band, a key chain with keys, an empty wallet, a small notebook and a note which reads: “SP 10: Spaniard. Tonight 10 PM" And it's signed A.M. As he takes the notebook, a small piece of paper falls out. It's a receipt from Clarcke&Sons, a hatter in Chelsea. It reads "1 Victoria hat. 10 pounds."

I don't think it's going to change your plans much. I've placed the most current map with a legend in this post so you can check distances. At the bottom right, there is a bar that tells you how far you could go in 15 minutes. I'll clarify when needed. If you want to know where something is, just ask.

Onwards, to the crime scene!

Grant Arms Co posted:

By prearrangement you meet Constable Beadle behind the Grant Arms Company in the alley parallel to Leonard street.

"I noticed a strange lump up the alley. I knew right off that something was amiss - my instinct for the out-of-place, you might say. Watch you step there! The cobbling hereabouts is in a bad way. Many a jagged edge just made for tripping a man."

We have strolled 30 feet or so from the base of a stairway that leads to the offices of the Grant Arms to arrive at the 'T' formed with another alley that leads to Old Street.

"It was right here and, sad to say, it was not a lump at all. Now the victim was lying on his back, the force of the bullet having thrown him backwards. The briefcase was lying right beside the body, waist-high. The wallet was lying a few feet away. The victim's overcoat was thrown open and his pocket watch was missing, but part of the chain was still attached to his vest. He was quite dead, but there was still some warmth in his bare hands, so I couldn't have missed the blighter by much.

Now, I figure the perpetrator must have hid in that shed just up this second alley. When the victim approached, he jumped out and fired point-blank. As you can see, it's but five feet from the shed to where the body lay"

We thank Constable Beadle for his time and trouble. He goes back on patrol, but we linger a moment longer at the scene. From the shed Wiggins calls to us.

"Seems both Scotland Yard and our 'Perpetrator'have been quite careless."

His open palm reveals the remains of a cigarette. On it are the letters "B&H" in gold leaf. The tip is pinched evenly all around.

Beaming, Wiggins suggests that we adjourn to to the offices of the Grant Arms Company, to interview Allen's private secretary.

Our unorthodox means of entry via the back door startles a young man we meet in the corridor. Fair-haired and pleasantly featured he turns out to be William Linhart. After introductions are made and we are seated in Linhart's office, Wiggins asks him a question that has been nagging at all of us since the beginning.

"What was Mr. Allen doing in the alley?"

"Anytime he worked after hours, which was often, he would leave by the back way. It was a short walk to Old street where the traffic was heavier and a cab more likely to be hailed".

"So anyone who has a passing knowledge of Mr. Alan's habits, company employees or even business acquaintances would sent only have been aware of that practice?"

"Yes, that's so"

"That evening Mr. Allen was scheduled to meet with Captain Egan at 8:30. Can you tell us who Captain Egan is?"

"He's the Ordinance Officer in charge of purchasing for the Admiralty."

"Do you know what the meeting was about?"

"He and Mr Allen met often to discuss the special project undertaken for the Admiralty some months ago, but I was unaware of that particular meeting. Mr. Allen regularly delivered progress reports, but only during the day, and I always make the appointments. I remember that Mr. Allen asked me to put the SP#10-A folder into his briefcase. It surprises me because I was not aware of an appointment with Captain Egan."

"Could you tell us about this special project?"

"It is very secret, but I suppose I can say that it involves the development of a new type of naval gun."

"Where there problems with the project?"

"None that I'm aware of. Mr. Allen was very concerned about security, though. While we do sell arms to foreign powers, there are certain weapons that are exclusive for our own Government. Special Project # 10-A was one."

"Was Mr. Allen's concern over security based on a specific incident or centred on a specific person?"

"The existence of the project was common knowledge, so I'm sure the expected a certain amount of, well, spying. He called in Lord Ragland to discuss the matter after several strange people were seen hanging around the Deverell street plant."

"Why would the plant be under surveillance?"

"All the technical data, blueprints, formulas, that type of thing are housed there. Our offices here are entirely administrative."

"Mr Allen's brother believes that he was having an affair at the time of his death"Realizing that this is a delicate matter, do you know who the lady might have been?"

"No, I don't. Over the years I have always known about Mr. Allen's pecadillos but only in the most general way. We would be working and something would trigger a cryptic remark that obviously had to do with his personal life. For example, just after the International Arms Fair opened, he received a scented letter on pink stationery. Later that day he was dictating a memo to Lord Ragland when he stopped and picked it up. He took a full whiff of it and said aloud, 'Women often marry for a title but they won't necessarily fall in love for one.' Then he laughed and went on with the memo."

"You're now secretary to the new president Mr. Marlowe?"

"Yes. He was Mr. Allen's hand-picked succesor, which perfectly illustrates the kind of man Mr. Allen was. There was no love lost between them and yet, recognizing Marlowe's outstanding business acumen, he named him as his heir,so to speak."

"Thank you, Mr. Linhart. You've been very helpful."

Some new leads and motives here. Theft? Industrial espionage? Women? An enraged husband? The hunt is on!

Fat Samurai fucked around with this message at Mar 24, 2015 around 15:07

Chekans 3 16
Jan 2, 2012

No Resetti.
No Continues.




Grimey Drawer

My first thoughts are to get the cigarette checked out with the criminologist, or head to the coroner to check the body.

Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.


Just in case I hadn't made it clear, feel free to discuss whatever part of the case you want, besides where to go. The game comes with a pretty complete directory of London with hundreds of particular an business addresses, and it's very sandboxy.

For example (and I'm not saying this is a good idea, or relevant to the case) if at any point you decide that the competitors of the Grants Arm Co are involved, there are no less than 6 in London, and you can check with most of them. Be creative, use the map and the newspapers, ask me questions. I'll try to answer what I can regarding what you can investigate about a particular topic, because not having the London Directory in front of you can be a handicap.

bobvonunheil
Mar 18, 2007


Chekans 3 16 posted:

My first thoughts are to get the cigarette checked out with the criminologist, or head to the coroner to check the body.

Bear in mind this isn't a computer game, and every single place you go is prewritten - so if there isn't a cigarette given in the original case description, going to the criminologist after seeing a cigarette at a location won't suddenly give an infodump on that cigarette.

Chekans 3 16
Jan 2, 2012

No Resetti.
No Continues.




Grimey Drawer

bobvonunheil posted:

Bear in mind this isn't a computer game, and every single place you go is prewritten - so if there isn't a cigarette given in the original case description, going to the criminologist after seeing a cigarette at a location won't suddenly give an infodump on that cigarette.

Oh, I was assuming certain evidence had prewritten things about them too. Thanks, I'll keep that in mind.

Fat Samurai
Feb 16, 2011

To go quickly is foolish. To go slowly is prudent. Not to go; that is wisdom.


Well, I was giving some time to see if someone had anything to add, but it seems Chekans is the lead investigator. I'l l pick up the pace after the next clue if I see there is no input from other players.

bobvonunheil posted:

Bear in mind this isn't a computer game, and every single place you go is prewritten - so if there isn't a cigarette given in the original case description, going to the criminologist after seeing a cigarette at a location won't suddenly give an infodump on that cigarette.

And as if to prove it:

Sir Jasper Meeks posted:

Sir Jasper Meeks explains that Allen was shot in the chest at close range.

"From a distance of two feet, no more - there were extensive powder burns on his overcoat"

"Do you have the bullet?"

"No, but it must have been of large calibre; the exit wound is massive."

It seems that if you want to find out about the cigarette, you'll need other means. The man is a medical examiner, not CSI, after all.

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The Supreme Court
Feb 25, 2010

Pirate World: Nearly done!

Hey! Sorry I've not posted much; am intending to be a crazy investigative person, but Uni deadlines and work are kicking my arse the last few days. I'll have much more time as of tomorrow!

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