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Mercury Hat
May 28, 2006

SharkTales!
Woo-oo!




There's now a chatroom, #makingcomics on synIRC. If you've never used IRC before, just ask for help.

This thread is for anything comic-making-related. Comics are a great marriage between prose and illustration and they have their own unique language and structure, I like comics a lot! This thread will be more skewed towards making webcomics, but most of the same stuff applies to print comics as well. More and more these days, independent comic artists are finding a good audience online, we're in a real upswing of comics as a medium. It's an exciting time!

Previous Thread is Here

How do I use this thread?
  • Post any questions you have about your story, page layout, website, or anything else about making a comic. Chances are someone will be able to help.
  • Don't use this thread as an RSS feed for every update.
  • If you want to talk about how great the latest update of X was, it might be better off in the BSS Webcomic thread, unless the creator posts here regularly.
How do I get started?
  • You might think about getting some practice in drawing shorter comics before tackling your 500 page masterpiece.
  • Think about your update schedule: if you want regular updates, figure how many pages you can put out in a week and subtract 1. If you want to do batch updates, think of how many you can do before you feel like biting off your arm.
  • Think about why you're doing it. It's very rare that a new comic will take off right away, it's a gradual build-up. Make sure you really like what you're doing, and not just waiting for a movie option to come through.
How do I draw it?
    You'll have to figure out the best way for you make a page, it takes a bit of trial and error and there's no one way to do it. There's obviously a big push to digital, but a lot of people are still working traditional. This list will focus on digital tools, since that's what I'm most familiar with.
  • Tablets: Wacom's still the gold standard, but there's been an increase in other manufacturers making drawing tablets. The competitor tablets can be a little trickier to get working, so do your research. Professional illustrator Ray Frenden has done a number of reviews and I've heard some people are happy with Monoprice or Yiyinova tablets.
  • Drawing programs: Manga Studio / Clip Studio Paint (same program, different names and CSP is digital only I think), my favorite and it often goes on sale. You don't need the EX version, the only difference is EX has 3d models and the story mode (story mode lets you group numerous pages into a book, like a folder, it's not necessary). Paint Tool Sai and Photoshop are still very popular, too, and have a lot of community support. Ray Frenden, the guy above, has digital brushes for Photoshop and Manga Studio, I recommend you check 'em out.
Tips and Tricks?
  • Back up your work, back up your work, holy poo poo back up your work. If your only copy of your entire work is on one computer that's bad. Hard drives die, computers catch fire, lightning strikes. Back up your stuff to a separate hard drive, look into offsite archiving like dropbox, and always check to make sure you're keeping up to date files in multiple places. So many sad stories.
  • If you have even the smallest idea in the back of your head that you might want to publish, start working at 300dpi at minimum, 600dpi if your computer can manage it. 3 years from now you don't want to have to rescan or redraw a bunch of pages because all you have are your 72dpi web resolution files.
  • Save often. It's really easy to get into the groove of drawing and forget that old ctrl+s/command+s. Use it.
  • Remember comics is not a big community and that community has a long memory. Don't be a jerk if you want to be serious .
How do I host it?
  • There are a number of free hosts specifically for webcomics, the benefit is you have a community familiar with webcomics, admins to help with hosting problems, and a built-in network of support for cross-advertising. They also usually have built-in comments systems and sometimes a forum option. Listed in the order I remembered they existed:
  • Tumblr is another free option, but it's not specifically designed for webcomics as above. You have to use the Webcomic Theme but it does support disqus integration for comments.
  • If you have your own hosting but don't know anything about coding:
    • Wordpress is probably still the simplest, many web hosts have it pre-installed or a one-button installation wizard for it. The downside is if Wordpress has a major update, it might break your plug-in until the developer can push out an update. You'll need a plug-in and they usually need specific themes. Choose a plug-in that's been recently updated, older ones may be more delicate to Wordpress updates. Plug-ins include Webcomic, Comic Easel, Manga Press and ComicPress
    • Grawlix is new to the scene, but it's a solid little Content Management System.
    There's more options if you know a coder you can commission, but any one the above will probably do enough for what you need.
How do I Network?
  • Post in this thread! It's small, but we're all doing the same thing here.
  • Find other comic communities. Forums, G+ groups (those still exist!), Facebook, whatever.
  • Social media. Tumblr, Twitter, and so on.
  • Fan art. People still love getting fan art. Draw for a comic you like, tag it on tumblr, make yourself visible.
  • Keep your ear to the ground for zines and anthologies you'd like to get in on. They're really making a come back.
  • Conventions are still a great way to meet people and get them to meet you. Even if you don't have a table, you can print up cards, minis, or little hand outs and trade or give them away to people. Don't be obnoxious, but be friendly.
  • Advertise on Project Wonderful.
How do I get Paid/Get Merchandise to People?
  • Patreon is a recent service allowing people to be an artist's patron. For comics you can choose to be paid per update or per month, and people can pledge money to you! You can even add goals like extra pages or goodies if you reach a certain amount per update/month. For rewards people offer access to a backer's only area, wallpapers, or even commissions if the donation is high enough.
  • GumRoad lets you sell PDFs, ebooks, and just about anything you can zip up. Lots of artists sell PDF copies of their comics, digital paintbrushes, etc. They don't allow adult content though.
  • If you know you have the audience to support it, comics do very well on KickStarter. Make sure to do your research on publishing costs, shipping costs, etc. Spike has a little book about KickStarting comics that I've heard is very good reading.
  • Comic Chameleon has a curation process, but it's an app that lets people read your comic on their phone or tablet. I've heard of a few people using it and they seem to like it.

New Resources!
Background and design tutorials from Twitter user Thomas Romaine. Lots of neat perspective tricks.


Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to Screen: Geared more to film, but lots of stuff can be applied to comics, too.

Random Resources scoured from the old thread.
Comics:
How to make a comic - An essential step by step guide from the very talented and successful creator of Lackadaisy Cats.
From Heresiarch a bunch of stuff!

Wally Wood's 22 Essential Panels




Books about comics:

Scott McCloud - ignoring the early 2000s "the internet is the future" stuff, Making Comics and Understanding Comics are still two solid resources. Reinventing Comics is a bit more dated and probably just worth a library check-out, if that.
Will Eisner
How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way
Random Art Posts from the old thread:
The classic Tom & Jerry Line of Action


How to draw lively poses - Spongebob drawing tips from Nickelodeon

Expressions - An excellent primer on expressions from Tracy Butler of Lackadaisy Cats.
The Phobs face tutorial.
Coelasquid's How to Draw Beef, and other tutorials (maker of Manly Guys doing Manly Things, professional animator).


OP is still a work in progress, feel free to complain about anything up there and submit OP stuff throughout the thread.

Mercury Hat fucked around with this message at Jun 23, 2015 around 10:31

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Mercury Hat
May 28, 2006

SharkTales!
Woo-oo!




Goooon Comiiiiiiics!

PM me or post in this thread to get your comic added to the post below
Goon run comics! Some of these goons may have moved on, but their comics linger.



Here are even more goon comics:
Princess Rainblood - Operation Juicebox
Dreamers - Nessa
Latch Key Kingdom - psych
Iothera - rincewind
Monster Pulse
GunnerKrigg Court - TeaSan - Has its own thread here.
The Intrepid Girlbot - Snicket
Sorcery 101 - KellHound
The Dragon Doctors - Speedball

Retired or not updating


Bobwhite by MagnoliaPearl
untitled comic - Oldyogurt
Name Removed - 0sn
paltry achievements Little Blue Couch
Girly (ended) - SuperHappy
Templar, Arizona - DarthVersace

Do you run a comic, and want to have your thumbnail added to this post? Just Post or PM me a 300 x 250 thumbnail that contains the name of the comic.

Mercury Hat fucked around with this message at Aug 19, 2016 around 11:49

Abyssal Squid
Jul 23, 2003
"I even think "Medicare for all" is pretty bad policy...I say that as a Medicaid recipient"

(Fuck you, got mine.)


So I hear this is never gonna be made into a comic, but I think this belongs here anyway.

Rethy
Feb 23, 2014

Here to Party


RIP Quetzal-Coital, you'll live on in a link at the top of the page.

John Liver
May 4, 2009



Making comics is hard work, but drat if it doesn't feel fulfilling.

readingatwork
Jan 8, 2009

Good grief



Just started this one. It's neat! And now I'm sad that it's apparently dead.

Operation Juicebox
Jun 26, 2006

Acnamino MR 100mg Capsules


Ahh, thank you for the new thread. Really helpful. I couldn't resist helping myself to those Frenden brushes.

Mercury Hat
May 28, 2006

SharkTales!
Woo-oo!




I went ahead and added an Imgur album with Thomas Romaine's stuff to the OP:

Background and design tutorials from Twitter user Thomas Romaine. Lots of neat perspective tricks.

John Liver
May 4, 2009



Here's a process GIF of a recent page. I really like how this one came out.

neonnoodle
Mar 20, 2008

by exmarx


That lighting is so lovely.

Kojiro
Aug 11, 2003

Abraca-bloody-dabra.

Oh flip, I love process gifs! More of these please, thread. Here's one for an older page of mine.

SexyBlindfold
Apr 24, 2008
i dont care how much probation i get capital letters are for squares hehe im so laid back an nice please read my low effort shitposts about the arab spring

thanxs!!!


Kojiro posted:

Oh flip, I love process gifs! More of these please, thread. Here's one for an older page of mine.



What are those filters that you do before and after laying the shadows? Is it to give the whole page a more unified tone/palette?

Kojiro
Aug 11, 2003

Abraca-bloody-dabra.

SexyBlindfold posted:

What are those filters that you do before and after laying the shadows? Is it to give the whole page a more unified tone/palette?

The first is just me reducing the opacity of all colour layers to 90% to let the colour underneath show through a little, then there's a texture (usually an old paper type one) laid under the characters and over the backgrounds. And yeah, it's a quick and dirty way to set a tone!

John Liver
May 4, 2009



neonnoodle posted:

That lighting is so lovely.

Thanks, I'm glad people are enjoying it.

Viga
Jun 2, 2009


Hello all! I'm studying to be a colorist and was hoping for a critique.



Pencils from the Greg Capullo. Inks by Rexbegonia. My professor told me, if I want to study it, I have to practice on others lineart. So, I am!

John Liver posted:

Thanks, I'm glad people are enjoying it.

I'm a fan of your work! I just found El Indon on Tumblr last week, so I'm still reading. It's great!

Viga fucked around with this message at May 26, 2015 around 05:36

fun hater
May 24, 2009


I make A Ghost Story and the new thread is a good start to trying to worm my way into discussions instead of lurking from the sidelines.

Right now, I'm looking for resources other than Scott McCloud for paneling and framing panels! I'm tired of winging it+feel like it need to put more thought into how I set things up.

Mercury Hat
May 28, 2006

SharkTales!
Woo-oo!




If you're looking to punch up your stuff with more action, you'll probably have good luck with Draw Comics the Marvel Way as well as the DC equivalent The DC Comics Guide to Creating Comics. Sometimes public libraries have a copy of one or both or you can probably get them cheap secondhand on amazon or half.com.

Nessa
Dec 15, 2008



Viga posted:

Hello all! I'm studying to be a colorist and was hoping for a critique.



Pencils from the Greg Capullo. Inks by Rexbegonia. My professor told me, if I want to study it, I have to practice on others lineart. So, I am!


I'm a fan of your work! I just found El Indon on Tumblr last week, so I'm still reading. It's great!

Very nice colour choices, though I'm a sucker for warm scenes like this. A few things though....

I would warm up the first panel a bit. The dark blue used for the background is drawing a lot of attention because it's the only cold colour on the page. It could still work if you balanced the page out with more cool shadows.

Colour the lips. Even if they aren't wearing lipstick, human lips are still going to be a slightly darker shade than their skin.

Push your shadows. I know you're just getting started, and I used to have the same problem, but try to make your shadows darker, so the page looks less flat. It's okay to put more focus on colour choices first, but try to work with your shadows, and make sure those shadows don't become too saturated. The shadows for this scene should be somewhat purpley blue to contrast with the warm sunlight. I would recommend putting a lot of side shadow on the girl in panel 4 to separate her more from the two characters in the background. Keep the background warm and the foreground a bit cooler. Same goes for panel 2. The girl's head and shoulders kind of blend into the background. Play with it a little to push her into her own plane.

Don't be afraid of gradients. Even if you're not going for a super rendered look, a simple gradient can do a lot for a scene with this kind of lighting.

Lastly, pay attention to the inking. A lot of lighting direction comes from the inks, rather than the script. In panel 3, you are actively going against the inks. See all that black ink by the dude's feet? Those are the shadows of the boxes, meaning that the light source in that panel is coming from the left side, whereas you have coloured it as coming from the bottom right. That could only mean that the primary light source it not coming from the windows after all. Maybe this isn't meant to be a sunset/sunrise scene in the first place.

Also, for help with breaking up planes, here's a great breakdown by colourist Dave McCaig. http://www.dave-co.com/gutterzombie...php?f=5&t=11966 The Gutterzombie site isn't as active as it used to be, but you can still find some good tutorials on there.

I hope that helps!

Nessa fucked around with this message at May 26, 2015 around 15:29

Quetzal-Coital
Mar 7, 2003


Abyssal Squid posted:

So I hear this is never gonna be made into a comic, but I think this belongs here anyway.



Rethy posted:

RIP Quetzal-Coital, you'll live on in a link at the top of the page.

If I'm remembered for nothing else I hope its these.

John Liver
May 4, 2009



I had this question on Tumblr, figured this would be a good thread to repost it.



So I was going to answer this short and sweet, but it became something complex and I feel like other people might as well read it.

There’s an old story that I don’t think I have anything left of … I wrote it in high school, it was called Sands of God. It was meant to be a sort of tough farce, an unforgiving slam on the kind of lame, cheap paperback fantasy that I used to get from book fairs and discount shops. The idea was that it would be a fantasy novel set within a bad fantasy novel, the latest in a long-running series by a fictional author. And at some point during the story, this fictional author would die, and his creations would be left adrift, forced to continue the story without his guidance. It was a really intriguing concept that I made an awful lot of supplemental material for - plotted chapters, designed characters, even charted out paths for a sequel.

I never wrote a word of it. The setting was vast and interesting, I just never made a narrative. Didn’t even start.

Writing up your own fictional universe feels like a massive undertaking because, more often than not, it is. Even short half-issue scripts can be a huge job because you need to pick over details again and again to make sure what someone says isn’t out of character, or that you didn’t forget that visual detail from Chapter 2, or you didn’t forget what shade of orange Roth was. And because it’s so much work, one logical strategy is to hash out absolutely everything in the setting - the “worldbuilding,” as some call it. Does this world have the same physics as our real world does? What’s the map of this planet look like? What languages do the people speak? What ethnicities do they have? What are the names of towns, cities, kings, criminals, gods, food, animals? This is a very, very enjoyable part of writing fiction. Weird and wild settings are insanely fun to write up, and are the color and flavor of every story… but they’re not the story, now are they?

Worldbuilding is fun to detail, but that’s all it is - detail. In writing El Indon, I wanted to make drat sure I didn’t fall into that same pothole. So I outlined the narrative arc first - crudely, superficially - and fleshed out from there. Pages and pages of copy. Then I did a ton of trimming. Whole characters vanished, came back, were renamed, combined. And now, the ending is decided, and written. I even like it a little. So now my document looks like this:



The “meaty” outline of El Indon is about 70-75 pages of single-spaced copy. On a good day. The comic so far has covered about 12 of those pages. A lot more is gonna be cut out from here, but make no mistake, this story I’m writing and drawing is … well, it’s gonna take a while. And I’d rather finish it before I keel over and die, so I’m trying to optimize it as best I can.

My biggest point to new comic writers is this: keep it moving forward. You need to keep brevity and efficiency in mind. Remember, every page you type is a page you have to draw, and color, and shade, and format correctly. Every single one. It really helps to know where your trail ends, too - all narratives end, and one doesn’t embark on a journey without an idea of where they’re going. Now I’m not saying to rush through your story - God knows, you and the reader want to enjoy the time you’re spending here. But know where you’re headed, and make sure you get there.

Speedball
Apr 15, 2008



Winging usually works better for me than detailing everything in advance. Like, have a general plan, but let that plan be flexible. The thing about comics is that since you have to do each page at a time you may find the characters subtly evolving even as you draw them, so you may wind up with things happening you never thought about, and usually for the better.

Troposphere
Jul 11, 2005


psycho killer
qu'est-ce que c'est?

yeah sometimes my male characters will subtly start growing boobs and I'm like wow, what a happy surprise!

John Liver
May 4, 2009



That's a different kind of narrative climax if ya know what I'm sayin

Mercury Hat
May 28, 2006

SharkTales!
Woo-oo!




My viewpoint is if it's directly important to the story, you should have an idea of how it works. If you're figuring out the past millenia of conflict between your elves and trolls and your story is about a kobold running a coffee shop you might have gotten carried away.

The most important thing of writing a story or drawing a comic, in my view, is to actually draw or write it. It's great if, after five years, you're happy with a pile of character designs and set pieces, but if the only way people can appreciate your story is to browse a wiki or your dA art gallery, that's not really a story. JRR Tolkien didn't publish the Silmarillion first, after all.

Rethy
Feb 23, 2014

Here to Party


World building is fun, and there's nothing wrong with doing so for the sake of itself, but when you're making one specifically for telling a story you've got to take a step back and think of what you really want to accomplish and what kind of world will allow you to tell a story you'll enjoy telling. After a while things are clear enough that you can start asking what other interesting stories the world allows you to tell, and it becomes kinda self-regulating.

One project I'm eager to work on down the line started as a melodramatic vampire vs werewolves thing in my young teens. Between that and me becoming an old teen, I tore down the entire plot and lore several times until all that's left is like, three characters and a monster concept. Even if the lore I cemented was cool in my 13-year-old head, I became a better writer and couldn't make anything remotely interesting and entertaining out of it! This is kinda a specific example, but I think the general idea of building the background to accommodate your personal strengths, or at least the skills you want to develop, is important to keep in the back of your mind before you really commit to something.

Rethy fucked around with this message at May 27, 2015 around 18:48

Fangz
Jul 5, 2007

Oh I see! This must be the Bad Opinion Zone!


Another problem with excessive worldbuilding, I find, is that it makes you want to rush your storytelling to get to the good parts, when the good parts in your head are never that good, and never as important as the meat and potatoes stuff you are currently doing.

sweeperbravo
May 18, 2012

AUNT GWEN'S COLD SHAPE (!)


Fangz posted:

Another problem with excessive worldbuilding, I find, is that it makes you want to rush your storytelling to get to the good parts, when the good parts in your head are never that good, and never as important as the meat and potatoes stuff you are currently doing.

This is a really good point. I've seen a bunch of people get caught up in how clever a part of their worldbuilding is, but it's like one of those things that most readers aren't going to care about unless it actually is part of the story. Kinda like folks who get really involved in crafting a wiki or extras/characters/world/about pages for their comics or making filler all the time, to the point where there's more "supplemental material" than actual story.


I like to read people's thoughts on worldbuilding because I personally hate doing it and as a result only ever write realistic fiction. A few times I've had an idea for a more fantastical story and have given up after getting maybe a few paragraphs into it because I realized the amount of (to me, unenjoyable) poo poo I'd have to create to actually support the story. Hell, a few years ago I got around to making a map of the town where my comic started off taking place and that alone, while rewarding, was really strenuous.

I'm glad I'm not representative of all or probably even the majority of writers because I've seen people do really cool things with worldbuilding. I can't appreciate it with the depth that someone more excited about it would be able to do, but good worldbuilding only makes a story better.

Squidster
Oct 7, 2008

Life's just better with Ominous Gloves.


The "A Softer World" crew is doing an AMA, and said this about ending the series: ( bolding mine )

quote:

But the more we talked about it, the more actual consideration we gave it. We don't know very many people who have stopped their comics. It seems like the expectation is just that it'll go on forever. And when we thought about the comic like that - like something that we would just keep doing and doing, it really didn't seem so appealing. We didn't know many comics that had stopped, but we could both name a ton that had stopped being GOOD, or where the creator was clearly bored of it and just phoning the comics in out of habit and as a job. And we did not want that. We didn't want to just keep doing the comic out of habit or for money.

And, another point - if we're being brutally honest - there is no money in it. There were a few golden years there where we made okay money from the comic and comic related things, but the only reason we can live off the comic now is because we're willing to live below the poverty line.

- https://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comme..._cocreators_of/
This is the worrying thing for me. ASW has been doing their gig for 12 years, and has an enormous amount of talent and brand recognition. How is it that they can't earn a living from it? I'd like to make comics my career someday, and it's always discouraging to see folks hanging up their hat without reward.

neonnoodle
Mar 20, 2008

by exmarx


Remember that whole idea that somehow people would figure out a way to monetize internet content into a living wage?
Yeah didn't happen

Quetzal-Coital
Mar 7, 2003


neonnoodle posted:

Remember that whole idea that somehow people would figure out a way to monetize internet content into a living wage?
Yeah didn't happen

Thats not totally true, but its an awful lot like any other small business or music group or art form.
Sometimes, even if you're good, its just not enough.
Have a backup plan.

Mercury Hat
May 28, 2006

SharkTales!
Woo-oo!




For anyone using Gimp for Windows, make sure to get it from their official site. The devs put out a warning that Sourceforge is bundling it with ads or something.

quote:

It appears that +SourceForge took over the control of the 'GIMP for Windows' account and is now distributing an ads-enabled installer of GIMP. They also locked out original owner of the account, Jernej Simončič, who has been building the Windows versions of GIMP for our project for years.

So far they haven't replied to provide explanations. Therefore, we remind you again that GIMP only provides builds for WIndows via its official Downloads page.
Source

Troposphere
Jul 11, 2005


psycho killer
qu'est-ce que c'est?

sometimes people will pay you a ridiculous amount of money for little to no content, like Aaron Diaz. but that's pretty rare and Diaz still complains about it like a huge baby.

WrathOfBlade
May 30, 2011



Wasn't A Softer World poetry superimposed over photographs? Not claiming to know their business model but it always seemed like a comic that did not come from a place of wanting to have a business model.

thousandcranes
Sep 25, 2007



I watched Stripped last night, and A Softer World was one of the featured comics. The last act was about the digital revolution and the bright future of web comics.

The last act seemed detached from reality, because the only people making a "living" doing webcomics are:
1) Living in a country with universal healthcare/ actual social safety nets
2) In literal poverty
3) Producing lowest common denominator product for over a decade
4) Yeah Aaron Diaz and the Penny Arcade guys too

If you count people who are recruited out of webcomics for other fields, the picture gets a little better. But they're not making a living at webcomics.

Edit: I don't mean to be so bleak. But literally the only reason to draw comics is because you love to. It's enough of a reason, but let's not pretend there's a pot of gold at the end of this rainbow.

thousandcranes fucked around with this message at May 28, 2015 around 02:34

Reiley
Dec 16, 2007



With regards to worldbuilding: if it doesn't affect the specifics of the story you're telling then you're wasting a lot of time on bullshit.

John Liver
May 4, 2009



thousandcranes posted:

Edit: I don't mean to be so bleak. But literally the only reason to draw comics is because you love to. It's enough of a reason, but let's not pretend there's a pot of gold at the end of this rainbow.

The main reason I draw my comic (other than I think it will be a fun story) is for constant, regular art practice. Self improvement is kind of an obsession of mine, and new pages are a great way to prune the weaknesses out of my artistic skills.

Also I want to get rich doing it, but we'll see how that goes.

Babe Magnet
Jun 1, 2008


I drew comics because someone paid me to draw comics, it owned.

FunkyAl
Mar 28, 2010

Your vitals soar.


thousandcranes posted:

I watched Stripped last night, and A Softer World was one of the featured comics. The last act was about the digital revolution and the bright future of web comics.

The last act seemed detached from reality, because the only people making a "living" doing webcomics are:
1) Living in a country with universal healthcare/ actual social safety nets
2) In literal poverty
3) Producing lowest common denominator product for over a decade
4) Yeah Aaron Diaz and the Penny Arcade guys too

If you count people who are recruited out of webcomics for other fields, the picture gets a little better. But they're not making a living at webcomics.

Edit: I don't mean to be so bleak. But literally the only reason to draw comics is because you love to. It's enough of a reason, but let's not pretend there's a pot of gold at the end of this rainbow.

There was also kind of the weird narrative where a bunch of people they interviewed said their comics "blew up overnight," which, if it was ever a common thing , basically never ever happens in The Year Of Our Lord 2015

E: Does anyone know if the supplementary interviews were....better? They omitted a lot of interviews they advertised by folks who would probably know what they were talking about.

FunkyAl fucked around with this message at May 30, 2015 around 21:48

Mercury Hat
May 28, 2006

SharkTales!
Woo-oo!




June is officially unofficially NaNoMango part 2! Nanomango is the comic counterpart to Nanowrimo, but less stringent in the "rules".
  • You can work on your current project(s), it doesn't have to be something totally new.
  • You can set your own goal for page count! Suggestions usually are: 30 pencilled/thumbnailed pages OR 15 inked pages OR 10 colored and inked pages.
  • If you post it on tumblr, tag it #nanomango and the tumblr might pick it up.
This is always a good opportunity to give your project a shot in the arm, so I'll be doing my best to follow through. It's good timing for me, I'm about to start a new chapter.

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Scribblehatch
Jun 15, 2013



thousandcranes posted:

I watched Stripped last night, and A Softer World was one of the featured comics. The last act was about the digital revolution and the bright future of web comics.

The last act seemed detached from reality, because the only people making a "living" doing webcomics are:
1) Living in a country with universal healthcare/ actual social safety nets
2) In literal poverty
3) Producing lowest common denominator product for over a decade
4) Yeah Aaron Diaz and the Penny Arcade guys too

If you count people who are recruited out of webcomics for other fields, the picture gets a little better. But they're not making a living at webcomics.

Edit: I don't mean to be so bleak. But literally the only reason to draw comics is because you love to. It's enough of a reason, but let's not pretend there's a pot of gold at the end of this rainbow.

Stripped was before patreon.

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