Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«56 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Flying-Chip
May 2, 2004



Welp, I finally published the first chapter of my comic CONTACTO VIOLENTO on Tapas and Webtoon, here goes:

https://tapas.io/episode/1447147

https://www.webtoons.com/en/challen...title_no=311778

Critiques and mockery are welcome.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

sammyv
Nov 8, 2010


Flying-Chip posted:

Welp, I finally published the first chapter of my comic CONTACTO VIOLENTO on Tapas and Webtoon, here goes:

https://tapas.io/episode/1447147

https://www.webtoons.com/en/challen...title_no=311778

Critiques and mockery are welcome.



I had a look. I guess it's kind of short on plot at the moment, what with it being the first chapter and all, so I mainly concentrated on what I liked about the art, which was the use of distinct shapes as building blocks in the makeup of the characters. Sharp lines and corners versus very round rounds, that sort of thing. Nice cross-hatching too. Oh, and I enjoyed that it seemed like every other panel the main character had a deranged kind of intensity in his eyes. It made me laugh out loud at least once - apologies if that's not what you're going for!

But well done anyway, basically, for climbing on board the madness that is the webcomic train. Best of luck to you.

readingatwork
Jan 8, 2009

Hello Fatty!




Fun Shoe

Flying-Chip posted:

Welp, I finally published the first chapter of my comic CONTACTO VIOLENTO on Tapas and Webtoon, here goes:

https://tapas.io/episode/1447147

https://www.webtoons.com/en/challen...title_no=311778

Critiques and mockery are welcome.



I prefer normal comics pages to the current format but other than that I think you have a promising start here. Your character designs are fun and executed in a unique way which is more than most comics can say.

My main advice would be to keep practicing the fundamentals and work what you learn into your work. Proportions in particular seem a tad off here and there and the result is that your more human characters look just a tiny bit too cartoony to me. Overall I like it though and you should definitely make more.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






I really like it - you art style is hella cool. I assume the younger dude is going to enter an MMA tourney and get his rear end handed to him, I like how you've set it up so we're not quite certain the old man is full of poo poo.

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



Flying-Chip posted:

Welp, I finally published the first chapter of my comic CONTACTO VIOLENTO on Tapas and Webtoon, here goes:

https://tapas.io/episode/1447147

https://www.webtoons.com/en/challen...title_no=311778

Critiques and mockery are welcome.


Very visually grabbing character designs, good job! Is the master based on Steven Seagal?

Flying-Chip
May 2, 2004



sammyv posted:

I had a look. I guess it's kind of short on plot at the moment, what with it being the first chapter and all, so I mainly concentrated on what I liked about the art, which was the use of distinct shapes as building blocks in the makeup of the characters. Sharp lines and corners versus very round rounds, that sort of thing. Nice cross-hatching too. Oh, and I enjoyed that it seemed like every other panel the main character had a deranged kind of intensity in his eyes. It made me laugh out loud at least once - apologies if that's not what you're going for!

But well done anyway, basically, for climbing on board the madness that is the webcomic train. Best of luck to you.

Thank you! Yes, I'm going for the deranged look because this comic is actually about how our society is making everyone insane.

quote:

My main advice would be to keep practicing the fundamentals and work what you learn into your work. Proportions in particular seem a tad off here and there and the result is that your more human characters look just a tiny bit too cartoony to me. Overall I like it though and you should definitely make more.

Yes, consistency and proportion are my biggest weaknesses because I have a really hard time giving a poo poo about correct proportions and always end up using really forced perspective on even the most casual of poses. I'm working on it.

quote:

Is the master based on Steven Seagal?

Yes. (edit: but also Frank Dux, the guy who's lies inspired the movie Bloodsport)

Thank you all for your comments, they mean a lot. New chapter later today.

Flying-Chip fucked around with this message at 19:24 on Jul 4, 2019

sammyv
Nov 8, 2010


I'm finally trying to do something with a comic I finished a few years ago. If you ever wondered what Gravity would be like with more psychodrama and knob jokes, you might find your answer at https://borrowmecomic.com (Academy Award quality not guaranteed). Feel free to post critiques and related hoo-hah. It looks like this, by the way:

sweeperbravo
May 18, 2012

AUNT GWEN'S COLD SHAPE (!)


Where do you go to talk about poo poo?

Like besides this thread, which tends to get a few posts in a month

I started my comic 10 years ago at a time when I think webcomics were just past their peak of popularity. Back then there were plenty of forums and sites to sign up with where you could talk with other people in the same hobby.

Now it feels like everything's just dying off if not already dead. Idk if it's just because I'm old and didn't follow the trend of where things were going, or if it's because I fell out for a while and then got back into things recently, but it seems like 99% of the people who were active anywhere a few years ago are gone and I guess it just makes me kind of sad. Tumblr and other more recent similar social media seem really lovely for sustained dialogue, or actually getting to know anybody. SmackJeeves got bought out by some google-related company and I had hoped that would bring new life to the community but it just seems to have followed along a steady decline

I poked a bit around the tapastic forums which seem active, but something about the layout makes it hard for me to follow discussions. That seems like the best bet rn though

I guess it's probably in my best interest to stop looking for a community, and just focus on making my comic for the 3 people worldwide that read it now and then, but shooting the breeze with other artists was fun and rewarding back in the day and I miss having those interactions with people.

Fangz
Jul 5, 2007

Oh I see! This must be the Bad Opinion Zone!


There's some IRL social groups I am involved in, but I think that depends on where you live.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






I dunno, but it's something I'd like too - for art in general. There's the Creative Chat thread that's a bit more active, but I agree it feels like social media has changed away from discussion in general. Internet's done, time to go home.

readingatwork
Jan 8, 2009

Hello Fatty!




Fun Shoe

Strangely enough Twitter seems to be the best way to actually talk to your audience/other creators these days. There are obvious downsides to that method though.

nankeen
Mar 20, 2019

by Cyrano4747


i started comicking about... six years ago? and have never found another community besides this one. everyone used to go on tumblr and now congregates on twitter but as mentioned those platforms completely suck for actually discussing anything. all the comic forums were long-dead by the time i got started, so this is my home now. it feels like there are innumerable millions of webcomics, but honestly i think there just really aren't that many people producing them. if you counted only english-speaking dedicated comic makers who are looking to socialise and aren't the sort of unhinged lunatic nobody would ever want to form a community with, you'd probably only end up with a few hundred individuals across the whole internet, and most of the big names seem to know each other personally by now and presumably use private messaging instead of forums to talk shop (and i can't say i blame them)

Reiley
Dec 16, 2007



Webcomic artists who started 10+ years ago are all branching out into other media, and the new webcomic artists met each other in the fan communities of older webcomics.

Neon Noodle
Nov 11, 2016

there's nothing wrong here in montana

Ainít it the truth.

mrfart
May 26, 2004

Dear diary, today I
became a captain.


sweeperbravo posted:

Where do you go to talk about poo poo?

Like besides this thread, which tends to get a few posts in a month

I started my comic 10 years ago at a time when I think webcomics were just past their peak of popularity. Back then there were plenty of forums and sites to sign up with where you could talk with other people in the same hobby.

Now it feels like everything's just dying off if not already dead. Idk if it's just because I'm old and didn't follow the trend of where things were going, or if it's because I fell out for a while and then got back into things recently, but it seems like 99% of the people who were active anywhere a few years ago are gone and I guess it just makes me kind of sad. Tumblr and other more recent similar social media seem really lovely for sustained dialogue, or actually getting to know anybody. SmackJeeves got bought out by some google-related company and I had hoped that would bring new life to the community but it just seems to have followed along a steady decline

I poked a bit around the tapastic forums which seem active, but something about the layout makes it hard for me to follow discussions. That seems like the best bet rn though

I guess it's probably in my best interest to stop looking for a community, and just focus on making my comic for the 3 people worldwide that read it now and then, but shooting the breeze with other artists was fun and rewarding back in the day and I miss having those interactions with people.

This has always been a problem in the comic world. I thought it was just so small in my country (Belgium), but the worldwide community seems almost smaller and I donít know any forum with a substantial amount of pro or semi pro artists who you can talk with. Itís the same with technical forums for clip studio or something. Thereís not enough activity to get something going. And, as others here said, the mainstream social networks donít want real discussions, they want you to get lost in their UI and click poo poo you shouldnít.

sweeperbravo
May 18, 2012

AUNT GWEN'S COLD SHAPE (!)


Part of the problem for me is that I'm 100% just in this as a hobbyist. I'm not a professional, I'm not trying to become a professional. I never got seriously "into it" in terms of going to cons, etc, part because what I do isn't marketable and more because I'm not enough into anything else to make a convention worth my time and money. 8-10 years ago I had people to talk to in the same boat, folks just in it for fun, or people (mostly fellow college students) who *were* on the road to doing art as a full time job but kept their comic as a fun side hobby. The problem with a hobby is when life changes, oftentimes you stop doing your hobby, so the overwhelming majority of those folks moved on.

I've reached out to a few people recently- found their (mostly inactive) dA or whatever, sent a message just asking how they're doing, etc, but most people who were into art/comics as a hobby just aren't into it anymore. Heck, like, out of the 100 people that have "favorited" my comic, I think only maybe 8 are still active SmackJeeves users, and that's just readers.


So like, I never ascended to be someone who "made it" and does this as a full or even a part time "job" however you want to define that, but I never completely outgrew wanting to do this for fun either. Do I spend as much time daily, weekly, annually on my comic as I used to in college? No, but I haven't dropped it either. So it's awkward. I'm like halfway between the two "worlds" so to speak.

I'll keep making comics, because i like my story regardless of whether anyone else does, but the environment has gotten very lonely.


Sorry for rambling. I'm day drinking and getting sad

Neon Noodle
Nov 11, 2016

there's nothing wrong here in montana

I feel you, bro. I don't want to go pro ever, but I'm still out here making stuff. For a while I had dreams, but they were vague and not based on what I really wanted to get out of life and work. These days I do what I want to do.

Unfortunately other posters are right, the "best" place to socialize with other comics people (at all levels of aspiration) is Twitter.

al-azad
May 28, 2009





Aside from the usual hosts to upload comics, what is the current platform for personal sites? Do people still use comicpress or has it been supplanted by something else?

readingatwork
Jan 8, 2009

Hello Fatty!




Fun Shoe

Goon Project: Invite all the webcomics people here and offer to buy them accounts.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






al-azad posted:

Aside from the usual hosts to upload comics, what is the current platform for personal sites? Do people still use comicpress or has it been supplanted by something else?

Comicpress seemed to break most of Wordpress for me, I could never really get it to play nice with any other modules. But I don't know of a better solution.

Reiley
Dec 16, 2007



readingatwork posted:

Goon Project: Invite all the webcomics people here and offer to buy them accounts.

Ouroboros...... the snake devours its own tail.........

nankeen
Mar 20, 2019

by Cyrano4747


i'd love to have more webcomics people here. yes they could potentially cause drama but we already get drama, and webcomics drama is generally funnier than most other breeds of drama so it could only liven up the place

mrfart
May 26, 2004

Dear diary, today I
became a captain.


lofi posted:

Comicpress seemed to break most of Wordpress for me, I could never really get it to play nice with any other modules. But I don't know of a better solution.

It has been giving errors lately on my site. I didnít change anything and donít know how to get rid of them. Itís always been something like that with comicpress. And again, thereís no community to ask about it.
I asked the creator himself about some of the problems, and he answered a couple of months later. Understandably, he has better things to do.

Ritznit
Dec 19, 2012

I'm crackers for cheese.



Ultra Carp

At least in my case it's also about me just being shy and easily intimidated about talking to other cool art folks. I totally know I shouldn't be, and I tell everyone around me the same, but I'm terrible at following my own advice. If folks here have some favorite hangout spots outside of SA, I'd love to check those out too, and if it's just to have a chitchat and feel less like a dummy.

BoneMonkey
Jul 25, 2008

I am happy for you.



There used to be the webcomics irc years ago, with all sorts of fun internet drama. Not sure if that's still around.

Is the boneyard still alive?

sammyv
Nov 8, 2010


There was an oral history of the Warren Ellis forums on the Image Comics site a while back that's worth a read. I missed the boat on it completely, but it's fascinating, and kind of a bummer, that there was this place that produced the likes of Matt Fraction, Kieron Gillen and Kelly Sue Deconnick and now there's basically nothing like it at all.

Reiley
Dec 16, 2007



BoneMonkey posted:

There used to be the webcomics irc years ago, with all sorts of fun internet drama. Not sure if that's still around.

Is the boneyard still alive?

The Boneyard has been dead for quite a long time, I'm afraid.

BoneMonkey
Jul 25, 2008

I am happy for you.



What an great era to be an awkward teenager that was.

RIP Boneyard.

nankeen
Mar 20, 2019

by Cyrano4747


what was the boneyard? was it a comics forum? i've never even heard of it

e: as a teenager i only had internet for a few hours every three weeks or so, so my online social life when i did manage to get online was basically just drifting helplessly through labyrinths of decaying fora with no idea what the big names were or where to go. i always wanted to find people to teach me how to draw a comic but i could just never find them, the only communities i knew about were livejournal and deviantart and neither of those were really what i was looking for

nankeen fucked around with this message at 23:24 on Jul 13, 2019

nankeen
Mar 20, 2019

by Cyrano4747


i mean we could start our own forum but i'm telling you now, we would have to just accept going in that ridiculous splits and interpersonal drama will cause the whole thing to come crashing down in flames within a few years. this is one of the things about split-off communities, no matter how kind everyone is it just seems to happen, chaos is inevitable. also i think starting a forum costs money and none of us have that

sweeperbravo
May 18, 2012

AUNT GWEN'S COLD SHAPE (!)


It seemed like every community I came to, I got in after the drama had subsided, or was fading out/small-time stuff like a troll whooshing through and trying to be an edgelord or a dumb but well intentioned person digging up old dead threads and posting as if they were still active.

New people stopped coming, old people stopped returning, posts by spambots sometimes outnumbered posts by humans on a weekly basis.

I guess that's what happens when you have a communtiy built around a hobby that is mostly a solitary pursuit. Like most people don't decide to make a webcomic for the social and personal interactions


One thing I'm sad I never did in my heyday was the 24 hour comic challenge. I used to, on maybe a monthly or bi-monthly basis, stay up until three or four in the morning working on comics, and had fancies of someday doing the 24-hour thing. Now the idea of having 24 hours plus recovery time to just throw away and spend on that is a brass ring. I had a friend IRL in college who also did a webcomic, and other friends who liked drawing even if they didn't publish stuff online. We probably could have put it together but it never happened.

nankeen
Mar 20, 2019

by Cyrano4747


sweeperbravo posted:

One thing I'm sad I never did in my heyday was the 24 hour comic challenge. I used to, on maybe a monthly or bi-monthly basis, stay up until three or four in the morning working on comics, and had fancies of someday doing the 24-hour thing. Now the idea of having 24 hours plus recovery time to just throw away and spend on that is a brass ring. I had a friend IRL in college who also did a webcomic, and other friends who liked drawing even if they didn't publish stuff online. We probably could have put it together but it never happened.
100% same even stuff like bartkira which at the time i thought was completely ridiculous, it still pops up on my radar occasionally as "hey here's this weird old relic of the past, some of it is surprisingly good" and i think, it could have been nice to have been a part of that stupid thing lol. i had friends with webcomics too, we'd talk about the characters irl and had our own weird little in-jokes, but in the end i think it was just that webcomics were each our private thing and we couldn't afford to lose that private time by inviting someone else into collaboration. we really needed private time because university, even art school, turns itself by design into your 24-hour life, so winding down from drawing by drawing something else became really our only option

comics are just insane amounts of work. i think that is the beginning and end of the webcomic problem! not only are they insane amounts of work, but the very nature of cartooning means you're pouring all those hours into something that you actively hope people will look at and think "oh how effortless". unless you go the other way into hyper detail, of which k6bd is the pinnacle, and produce something that took eighty hours and it looks like it took eighty hours. but where are those eighty hours supposed to come from? it's kind of hard to sustain into your mid-late-20s and beyond unless you are literally an angel of the lord

nankeen fucked around with this message at 01:33 on Jul 15, 2019

sweeperbravo
May 18, 2012

AUNT GWEN'S COLD SHAPE (!)


nankeen posted:

comics are just insane amounts of work. i think that is the beginning and end of the webcomic problem! not only are they insane amounts of work, but the very nature of cartooning means you're pouring all those hours into something that you actively hope people will look at and think "oh how effortless". unless you go the other way into hyper detail, of which k6bd is the pinnacle, and produce something that took eighty hours and it looks like it took eighty hours. but where are those eighty hours supposed to come from? it's kind of hard to sustain into your mid-late-20s and beyond unless you are literally an angel of the lord

You know, it's obvious and I should ahve thought of it before, but this is really true. I haven't timed myself, and it's hard to get an accurate quantification because I tend to work in batches and I take a poo poo ton of breaks, but it probably takes anywhere from 5-10 hours to do a page start to finish. Even if I was doing that regularly and doing one update a week, that's still ~45 minutes to 90 minutes per day that an adult just doesn't always have. And I can understand the diminishing enthusiasm of spending that much time to make a page that 5 people not related to you will ever look at. I still do it, because I think it keeps me mentally stable [insert jokes about deranged webcomic artists i guess], but it's a time sink especially when you think of the hours of work that go into a whole archive that someone can blaze through in an afternoon.

And while you start to streamline things and become more efficient, I think in general the better you get, the more time you tend to take on each page. poo poo, I used to churn out extremely crappy pages in like 3 hours. There was an albeit brief period where I updated twice a week. Crazy poo poo to think back on it.


re: the privacy thing- I know everyone says they're an introvert, but yeah, drawing and webcomicing, while they were things i liked to talk aobut sometimes and my friends and I did some batshit collaborations on small pieces, were always things that were for "me time." My one friend I mentioned could take her sketchbook or tablet or whatever and work on a page while we were all hanging out, but I had a hard time doing that. It was like working on my comic was and still is a sacred mental space for me and wasn't something I could easily merge into a group setting.

Schneider Heim
Oct 17, 2012


Random question: How did you meet your collaborators? I'm a writer and I'm looking for an artist. I'm going to attend comic cons to look for potential collaborators. Has that worked for anyone?

Squidster
Oct 7, 2008

Life's just better with Ominous Gloves.


I met everybody I know through working conventions and anthologies. It's worth keeping an eye on https://twitter.com/papercatblog for its weekly list of open anthology opportunities.

sammyv
Nov 8, 2010


nankeen posted:

comics are just insane amounts of work. i think that is the beginning and end of the webcomic problem! not only are they insane amounts of work, but the very nature of cartooning means you're pouring all those hours into something that you actively hope people will look at and think "oh how effortless". unless you go the other way into hyper detail, of which k6bd is the pinnacle, and produce something that took eighty hours and it looks like it took eighty hours. but where are those eighty hours supposed to come from? it's kind of hard to sustain into your mid-late-20s and beyond unless you are literally an angel of the lord

If nothing else, it's actually been really nice hearing you all talk about the realities of the work involved. I started my comic when I was 33 - I'm glad I did it, but I wish I'd had the wherewithal to start earlier, when time was in my side. It took two years to finish, and three more to slowly come to terms with the fact that no one really gave a gently caress about it. Three years of tinkering, going back to it, paying for ads, trying to make connections... Ugh.

I'm at the dog-end of that now, and feeling alright, but any creative project that involves an audience really is a two-headed beast of a thing. I was grinding every hour outside of work when I was knocking mine out, and probably did some permanent physical damage to myself in doing so. It was stupid, and I didn't see it coming, but it was nothing compared to the long grey corridor that followed. I'm glad I did it, and ultimately no one owes you anything, but I'm not sure I'd go back. Hats off to all of you for pursuing you own little insane visions.

sammyv fucked around with this message at 14:58 on Jul 15, 2019

Fortis
Oct 21, 2009



I started my comic at age 26 in 2011, and yeah... when I'm done, there is a pretty good chance I'm not going to do this again. It is, in the broadest sense, rewarding, and I think it'll feel really good to finish a story, but when I'm entrenched in the process of doing the actual work it can be tough to maintain a sense of perspective, and the lack of people giving a poo poo can really wear me down.

I've never really answered the question of "is it worth putting something creative out there when by and large most people don't care?" The only answer I've got at this point is a tentative "I think so?" because hell, I'm still doing it. The work has to be its own reward above all else, I guess. Sometimes it isn't. Usually it is... but sometimes it really isn't.

sammyv
Nov 8, 2010


I'd still say it was worth doing it, if only for the sense of accomplishment. I did a short print run afterwards, sold them all, and now I can say that I once made a graphic novel that (a few) people read and gave a poo poo about. If you'd have told me that when I was fourteen and reading second-hand X-Men floppies, I would have squealed with utter delight.

sammyv fucked around with this message at 14:52 on Jul 15, 2019

Shinmera
Mar 25, 2013




Yam Slacker

I feel like the internet also makes the whole popularity thing a lot harder, because it's so easy to see all the successes out there, people with thousands or millions of readers. If you're not happy with your work by yourself, as many creatives are prone to be, it's really hard to justify doing it if it looks like nobody even cares anyway.

I know all too well how prone I am to throwing in the towel when it comes to art, so I've become conditioned to restrict myself to really small projects that are far less likely to end up in an abandoned pile of frustration. Unfortunately that also almost completely rules out making comics or animations, so I've only ever done very little of that, despite wanting to do more of it.

Like all large projects, doing them as a team of one is just incredibly tough. It would be a lot better if there were an active and easy way to collaborate with other people, to keep that external stimulus up, but that too I know all too well is prone to fall flat because people just get busy with other stuff once the initial spark of excitement runs out.

I suppose you'd need to be able to put together a team that can work full-time to avoid that problem, but then where do you get the support from to put the food in people's mouths?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

nankeen
Mar 20, 2019

by Cyrano4747


i do think illustrated novels are going to be the next thing to take off. they get sneered at right now but that's just because there haven't been any really good ones - sooner or later an amazing one will come along and make actual money, everyone will get inspired, and then suddenly illustrated novels are a thing and because the barrier to entry is so much lower, enough people are trying to make one to start wanting to talk about it. technically they're not comics, but the community would be functionally the same. that could revive our whole weird little sphere. that's what i'm hoping for anyway!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«56 »