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al-azad
May 28, 2009



RobinPierce posted:

counting on people being too nice to say anything.

This did take place in Canada...

Seriously though, I don't know how this isn't bannable behavior at all the cons. It's not like he's paying them more money for more space and he can't possibly be generating 3+ artists worth of extra attendees to justify his table snatching.

Also his Wikipedia page got a little update, lol.

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al-azad
May 28, 2009



RobinPierce posted:

Are extra tables normal things at american cons? I have never seen a stray table at a major UK con.

I haven't been to Montreal Comiccon but it's about the same size as Emerald City and that con grew so large it takes up the entire 205,000sqft convention center. If there is a stray table it's probably not in an ideal spot. They generally organize guest booths so that they have prime walking space but now your fans are struggling to find you which is already disrupting the customers and that shouldn't fly at all.

The blame should fall on the con organizers who are not only aware that he does this, but they prepared back up tables for such an emergency as table annexing. I don't know how they weren't like "Buddy, move your poo poo by the next day."

al-azad
May 28, 2009



simplyhorribul posted:

First timer here!

I've been doing some silly comics in past, but they have been around one page gags and all. I haven't done anything for few years, but I want to try bit longer formats (at first, like 12 to 20 pages stories) before going full on graphic novel-long ones.

However, I loving hate designing the pages. I tend to do the storyboarding on post-it-notes and trying to figure out there how to put on pages, but so far I've been just going through those post-it-notes without getting one single page design done. I know few tricks - like give a reader an argument to read the next page (of course every page doesn't have to end with annoying cliffhanger) and the storytelling layout should guide the reader from the page, but it's pretty slim pickings, when I get the craving to tweak it more and more and more, because they always look so fugly.

Is there some more practical tips, guides and/help to actually design the panel lay outs on e page so that they work with the pictures? Or is it just something you have to do and hope for the best?

It's something you have to feel out and study because the layout drives the flow of your story.

Although I think a good challenge is the format Frank Santoro heralds. There's something to be said about a 4x4 grid of landscape oriented panels and I think 14 pages is an ideal number for a short story format. Here are the entries for 2013 and 2014 to see what other people are creating.

Definitely start small and move up. See what kind of story you can create in 3 pages or 8 or anything fewer than 24-32. Think about the mood you want to impart on the reader and how to best accomplish that. More importantly read other comics and study what worked for them and why it affected you in the way it did. Hell, redraw scenes from comics you enjoy with your own characters or whatever.

There's really no tip you could understand without both practice and studying.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Nessa posted:

What kind of a name is Ersatz?

Is that German?

It means substitute in German so take whatever symbolism from it you want.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



If you hesitate creating something because you're afraid it'll cause drama for yourself then congratulations, you're one step towards self awareness and should probably explore that hesitation further!

Ron Gilbert shares a related story. There's nothing wrong with changing something after a bit of reflection, it might actually make the work better.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



GreatJob posted:

I knew someone who used to get mad at feminists for not liking his comics about mind-controlling women to grow giant boobs that would snap off their bodies and eat each other. Had these feminists ever seen his comic? No, not at all, he didn't show them to any feminists, he just knew how they'd react and that made him SUCH a victim of the PC police.
...

In case you were wondering why I got to read it and not any of those other nasty feminists, yes, it's blackmail material comedy gold.

(holy crap, Avshalom)

This is my biggest pet peeve. I work with a guy whose like "I really want to make a Muslim joke but I just know someone is going to get in my face." No man, go ahead. Nobody actually cares about you or your lovely jokes and I'll still rest easy at night.

Some people get mad thinking someone is going to get mad at them. There's this crazy scenario playing out in their head where they say something profound and the masses descend.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Squidster posted:

Okay, so, in an effort to do some actual goddamn discussion and not whatever babytown frolics are going on here, check out:

Tips for Properly Crediting Comics Creators

While it mostly applies to Big Two books, it's useful general advice for comic journalists reviewing books. I know a lot of casual readers who simply have no idea who draws their favorite books, and very, very few people who could name the inkers or letterers.

In the last volume of Toronto Comics, I went out of my way to list artist -> writer in our marketing and credits. It's one of those weird things in comics - at an early career level, it's all about the artists. Any wannabe writer needs an artist to get their totally-sweet idea in the real world, and artists get the lion's share of respect. As a product takes off, the audience often seems to end up respecting the writer more and the artist less.

I'd say at the very least if you don't put as much information as Diamond does in their listings (which is literally one line under the title) then you need to go back and edit your article/review/whatever. The writer, pencil/inks/colors, and whoever drew the cover you're displaying. Sorry letterer, you guys always get shafted.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



It's definitely the popular web layout of East Asia where comic dialog is read vertically.

al-azad fucked around with this message at Aug 15, 2015 around 14:11

al-azad
May 28, 2009



We didn't have smartphones when he was doing revolutionizing comics, although I think orienting your phone horizontally (okay, horizon is flat... uh) and scrolling left to right would work fine in a single panel landscape style. It just never really caught on, I can name 2 comics that do it.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



JuniperCake posted:

So hey, if anyone wants a good example of how not to respond to a rejection from a comics anthology (or how not to interact with another human being ever) here you go.

https://twitter.com/neekaneeks/stat...244348007776256

Jesus christ.

I'm pretty sure I found that guy's blog and his ramblings are on another level.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Using a tablet is like playing Surgeon Simulator to me but the paper sketch to digital ink is a good transition. I'd throw my tablet out the window if I didn't need it for touch ups.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



WrathOfBlade posted:

How crass and transparently exploitative would it be if I started uploading from the archives of my already-extant webcomic to a service like Tapastic? It seems like a reasonably low-effort way to get my work in front of some new people, but then there's a whole community of people who actually generate original content specifically for that format and I feel like they'd be 100% within their rights to think I'm an rear end in a top hat for capitalizing on their thing.

...also I think the text in my comics is barely legible on most phone screens. That's probably a more valid point to be concerned about.

Not at all? It's a free service for the purpose of uploading comics. If your layout is bad that's your fault but never feel bad about advertising yourself.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Talking mice in Auschwitz worked so I don't see how moe girls in Auschwitz is farfetched.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Image and Dark Horse are always open.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Scribblehatch posted:

Yeah those were the only 2 I could think of as well. That's weird how few there are.

You might also want to look at these lists. Like Boom studios encourages portfolios to be posted on their Facebook.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



The Ayshkerbundy posted:

I'm curious: What's a good DPI for a scanner?

Pretty much every flatbed scanner offers the same DPI. The important thing is what option you select which should be minimum 300 for book quality, ideally 600 for archiving IMO.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



I use the Pilot Kakuno for fixed line and lettering. I've got a refillable cartridge I ripped from another fountain pen and use Noodler's black ink which is waterproof.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



You can have action taken against you for referencing copyrighted material, regardless of its shape or form, if an argument is made that it's close enough to be confused with the original material. There's no distinction between freehand or tracing, all that matters is someone can prove the work is similar enough to be damaging to them.

So "generally speaking" people don't care although I'd personally rephrase that to "generally speaking" people won't notice if you're loosely referencing.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Any opinions on Tapastic? I want to launch a small project and have all the website/community features on the back end without worrying about it too much.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Needs more orange.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



mrfart posted:

I'm thinking of drawing my next comic (if I ever get there) with a more technical pen, without variations in line thickness.
I don't have money fo real rotring pens, and the way I press my pens would destroy them too fast anyway.
There are some nice cheap alternatives, but the very thin ones that I like most (pilot hi-tec) aren't water/light fast.

What are some of you guys favorite weapons?

Sorry if this is a repost.

What's your budget and why does it need to be water resistant? Right off the bat I'd recommend a disposable like microns.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Never used a Rotring, but if they're anything like Rapidograph then you get what you pay for. They're expensive but basically last forever and ink is about $5 once a year depending on use.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



I really do think you would benefit from wider gutters. The art is great but busy, and with background details in nearly every panel things get real claustrophobic.

Also watch your tangents. Some of the balloon tails are touching or crossing through so many details. Like panels 4, 5, and 6 are real obvious in how the tails meet up at a vertical line which looks sloppy. It's okay to erase a little around where balloon tails point.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Just from a cursory glance the addition of wider gutters makes it so much more readable and professional looking.

Neon Noodle posted:

BOOK BOOK BOOK BOOK BOOK

Got the proof from the printer! They did really nice work. Highly recommended: Art Bookbindery in Winnipeg.



If you don't mind, what are they charging and what was the minimum order size? Do they print adult material (and by that I mean rated R at worse)?

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Don't you will die poor and everyone will hate you.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Vermain posted:

Thumbnails are important for the artist, but I think they're less so for the writer. The writer wants to concern themselves with the importance of what's going on in the panel: the emotions that will be on display, the action that will be taking place, etc. Unless you're already a reasonably competent artist, you'll just end up spending more time trying to get the drat thumbnail to look like something compared to rewriting a panel sequence if you're dissatisfied with how it flows.

Counterpoint: comics being a visual medium means the writer should know how they flow. You don't have to be a competent artist to thumbnail, it can be done completely with stick figures.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



You're setting yourself up for failure by not doing anything. You can plan the finished product, building an audience, investment, and work involved all you want but until you put pen to paper you got a resounding nothing.

I'll say this, as someone who has published TRPG material, the barrier for art in general is indeed higher. There are some dedicated forums to find an audience but they are very scrutinizing and selective. The pervasive opinion for art posted online is that it should be free and if you put up some kind of barrier up front it'll be ignored until you've established something people are willing to contribute to. You'll have to work hard to build that audience, investing a lot of money.

That said there's crossover potential. If people from the TRPG world know your name you can spin off from what you've established. That's how Rich Burlew launched Order of the Stick, he was a finalist in a D&D competition with some writing credits then created a successful webcomic from it.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Schneider Heim posted:

Since we're slightly touched the topic of commissions, how does ownership work? Should a contract be signed to prevent any legal problems?

My rough understanding is:

1. I commission artist to do the art for my comic and pay them
2. I publish the comic in my own site (and own all publishing rights)
3. Artist is free to repost the art they did for the comic or include it in their portfolio

Is this how things would work?

You want a contract if money is exchanging hands, it's just smart. Here's an example by Tim Larsen. You stipulate who owns what, what kind of reproduction is allowed (you might have first publishing rights while the artist can reproduce their original work afterward), payment, deadline for delivery, terms of fulfillment and termination.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Schneider Heim posted:

How can the terms in the sample contract be enforced if the artist and client live in different countries?

You can't really. The contract is there mainly to protect yourself in your country, but also to clearly establish terms.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



I don't know of a better program to clean up and stitch together scanned images so Photoshop is pretty important for that feature alone.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



I've had the same watercolors for 10 years, only ran out of a few tubes usually the neutral colors. Still have a bottle of bulletproof ink purchased in 2008 and I exclusively write with fountain pens.

Physical media has been far more economical than any other alternative for me.

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al-azad
May 28, 2009



KingKalamari posted:

So, having been working on writing a large-scale comic project for the past year or so I had a moment a few weeks ago and sat down and seriously assessed my overall concept for how long this drat thing is going to be and realized in the form I had envisioned it I would be lucky to get the thing done in 20 years if I kept to a reasonable pace. For my own sanity I have decided to drastically cut back on the scope of the project to something that could conceivably be completed by one person in less than several lifetimes. I've managed to cut things down to telling a story in roughly four large parts (Whether this actually turns out to be feasible or just a slightly less ridiculous pipe dream remains to be seen). The only problem I'm running into is a general sense of anxiety at having to limit the length of the thing to "finite" and worrying it won't give me the opportunity to explore all the stupid plotlines and shenanigans I've had ideas for. Anyone else ever dealt with this?

As well: Anyone know of any good articles on plotting out a long-form narrative? Articles about plot outlines are rarer than I'd hoped and articles specific to graphic novel format are virtually non-existent.

you should watch this

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