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TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.



The Vegan Thread
Hi! This is the thread for vegan food. Vegan food is food that doesn't have any animal products: no meat, no milk, no butter, no honey, no eyeballs, etc. This thread is not for arguing about why anyone would ever be vegan. This thread is also not for talking about whether vegan food is healthy.

It would also be great if this thread were about actual vegan food, not non-vegan food that turns out to be vegan because the "sausage" you use is actually made out of... lord knows, but somehow not meat. If you want to talk about the occasional "fake" vegan thing, like "how can I make buttermilk biscuits," then go ahead, but if your idea of vegan food is "how can I take a recipe centered around meat and replace it with some fake poo poo," then this is a thread for you to learn other options, not a thread for you to share your favorite brand of kalebasa "sausage."



What do Vegans Eat?
Sometimes when I tell people I am vegan they say "wow, how do you do that?" I tell them that it is pretty easy: whenever there is food that has animal products in it, I don't put it in my mouth. That's literally all it takes to be vegan!

But I know it can be kind of hard to understand the right "way" to be a vegan if you've been raised in a culture where meals are largely based around some kind of meat. If you've been alternating between steak, chicken, pork, fish, and ham for dinner for the last 30 years, it can be very hard to know where to start with meals that are meatless.



The best way to figure out how veganism works is to look at cuisines around the world that for practical or ethical/religious purposes are largely vegan already. It turns out that if you are poor you often can't afford to kill a chicken every time you get the munchies. So lots of cuisines that aren't based on eating like the king of France already have lots of options for vegan food, day in day out.

A huge variety of Indian cuisines, for instance, are full of vegan food. You can make a full meal out of some kind of rice (or other grain), some kind of pulse (beans, lentils, peas), vegetables, and spices. Add in some bread and a pickle and a vegetable side dish and you have an infinite variety of meals just as substantial as a steak and potatoes. Veg Recipes of India has many good recipes.

Lots of Ethiopian recipes are vegan or can be made vegan really easily by using oil rather than clarified butter. See here for details and recipes.

Plenty of Middle Eastern food turns out to be vegan (like falafel!). Try ful medames, koshari, pita bread, manakish za'atar, musabaha, loubi bi zeyt, marak silk, beet salad or eggplant salad, balilah, and so on.

Lots of Chinese food is vegan - before Westerners discovered tofu and started competing for the prize of "who can make this taste like nothing" and the other prize of "who can make this taste the most like meat," many cuisines, including many varieties of Chinese cuisine, were making dishes that actually taste great, like bear's paw tofu. Learn some easy ways to stir-fry vegetables and you'll instantly have dozens and dozens of vegan recipes on your hand.



Learning to be Vegan
I am a big fan of this cookbook. It's vegetarian, not vegan, but it teaches you the basics of how to think about cooking a vegan meal: grab whatever grain you feel like today, whatever pulse you feel like today, whatever vegetables you feel like today, and whatever spices you feel like today, and cook them the right way to make them delicious.



Another way to learn how to be vegan is to try "Meatless Mondays," which are pretty much what they sound like except you also should cut out butter and so on. It's not too much trouble to look up a recipe for something to eat one day of the week, and if you cook a different thing each week and pay attention to what you like and why you like it, soon you'll be able to build up a repertoire of vegan food and vegan cooking techniques that you enjoy.

Finally, you can always pick up a cookbook and cook a bunch of stuff from it.



Vegan Cookbooks and Recipes
Our very own dino. has a book, Alternative Vegan. It has rave reviews!

I'm a fan of Afro-Vegan and Vegan Soul Kitchen, both by Bryant Terry. I also love Teff Love.

Other good sources include Kansha for Japanese food, Manjula's Kitchen for some Indian food, Serious Eats for various things (including some fake poo poo), The Lotus and the Artichoke for lots of stuff, including Mexican, Sri Lankan, and Malaysian, China Sichuan Food's vegan section for Sichuanese cuisine, and... list your own and I'll add them to the OP!



The Vegan Pantry
You'll probably want to keep a wide variety of grains and pulses around so that you always have a basis for any kind of meal you want. My favorites are Jasmine rice, brown rice, couscous, wheatberries, black beans, kidney beans, chickpeas, moong dal, green lentils, and pinto beans. Nuts of various kinds are good to have around - they can add a lot of flavor and body to a dish. If you do a lot of baking, some kind of fake milk (soy, coconut, almond) is important to have around. A big jar of tahini (check your local Middle Eastern market) is never a bad choice.

You probably have these already, but if you don't, various kinds of vinegars (white wine, red wine, rice, balsamic, apple cider) and oils (sesame, canola, peanut, olive, extra virgin olive) are helpful for salads and all sorts of other things. And of course you want all the spices. Buy them from a grocery store that sells them in bulk (those tend to be cheaper) or from ethnic markets (ditto), or, if you have no other options, I've heard Penzey's is good.

Baking
My favorite vegan chocolate chips are the Trader Joe's ones. I've always had people say very nice things about pies from Vegan Pie in the Sky and cookies from Vegan Cookies Invade your Cookie Jar. The olive oil pie crust from Vegan Pie in the Sky is a very good pie crust.



BOoooze
Check Barnivore before you buy any alcohol to make sure you aren't accidentally drinking fish bladders or whatever it is that they put in some beer.



Recipes
More to come later!

TychoCelchuuu fucked around with this message at Dec 12, 2018 around 01:21

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dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Awesome start, TC. There's plenty of stuff to get most questions answered. Going to write more when I get home.

grandpas drunk
Jun 10, 2015

by Ralp


Is uh, you know "man milk" considered vegan? Cause all I eat is bread and liquor so I think in good but I've also had my share of seemen and im worried I may have exploited a dick or two

Edit : not gay

grandpas drunk fucked around with this message at Jul 6, 2015 around 00:31

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004

RAAAAARGH!!!! GIFT CARDS ARE FUCKING RETARDED!!!!

(I need a hug)


Good OP TychoCelchuuu.
I'm not a vegan, but I eat a lot of vegan meals due to budget and sometimes being sick of meat.
The weather is cold right now, so I'm making a vegetable soup (probably with butternut squash and spinach), a bean stew, and either aloo gobi or tikil gomen this week.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

I'm not actually a vegan but I cook meat very rarely. I'll be following this thread, thanks for making it! Is this thread also appropriate for vegetarian discussion or do you want it strictly vegan?

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

guppy posted:

I'm not actually a vegan but I cook meat very rarely. I'll be following this thread, thanks for making it! Is this thread also appropriate for vegetarian discussion or do you want it strictly vegan?
This is the vegan thread! You can make a vegetarian thread if you want. Vegetarian food is such a massive category (eggs alone add like a million kinds of dishes) that vegetarian food would easily take over the vegan thread and we could go for 20 pages without talking about any vegan food. I'd rather not have that.

wootsie
Feb 27, 2013


So happy that there's another vegan thread. Like the other few posters, I'm not a vegan (I guess pescatarian? Meat hurts my guts other than fish), but I love vegan recipes.

Hitlers Gay Secret
Mar 7, 2010

The Third Reich's under new -- and better -- management.

Hasn't word reached Camp Pendleton yet?


College Slice

TychoCelchuuu posted:

This is the vegan thread! You can make a vegetarian thread if you want. Vegetarian food is such a massive category (eggs alone add like a million kinds of dishes) that vegetarian food would easily take over the vegan thread and we could go for 20 pages without talking about any vegan food. I'd rather not have that.

Could you actually explain the difference between vegetarian and vegan? Because I've been using the term interchangeably for quite some time. Mostly so I'd stop being called a enjoyable human being and other homophobic slurs for making vegan meals. People seem to hate the vegan and love the vegetarian.

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



Hitlers Gay Secret posted:

Could you actually explain the difference between vegetarian and vegan? Because I've been using the term interchangeably for quite some time. Mostly so I'd stop being called a enjoyable human being and other homophobic slurs for making vegan meals. People seem to hate the vegan and love the vegetarian.

Vegetarians don't eat meat. They still eat eggs and dairy products (milk, cheese, etc.). They also eat honey.


Vegans don't eat meat. Vegans also don't eat ANY foods derived from animals. No eggs, dairy, honey, or leather jackets.


The reason people seem to hate vegans is because an extremely vocal minority of them have extremely off-putting holier-than-thou attitudes about their lifestyle choices. Most vegans are cool people.

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


Nice to see another vegan thread!
I really liked the last one and I like my Dino-book, so I can't wait to see what I'll discover here.

Not an actual vegan either by the way, but I'm usually not a meat person when cooking for myself.

Today it's going to be couscous with onions, red pepper, garlic, orange zest + juice and chickpeas, together with grilled vegetables and raw spring onions.
I could eat that any day of the week.

Also, hummus is the best thing in the world, especially a turmeric/curry type (I hardly ever made it in a different way since I discover that one.....except for the occasional jalapeno honey type maybe)

anyway: vegan thread FTW

Hitlers Gay Secret
Mar 7, 2010

The Third Reich's under new -- and better -- management.

Hasn't word reached Camp Pendleton yet?


College Slice

The Midniter posted:

Vegetarians don't eat meat. They still eat eggs and dairy products (milk, cheese, etc.). They also eat honey.


Vegans don't eat meat. Vegans also don't eat ANY foods derived from animals. No eggs, dairy, honey, or leather jackets.


The reason people seem to hate vegans is because an extremely vocal minority of them have extremely off-putting holier-than-thou attitudes about their lifestyle choices. Most vegans are cool people.

Thanks. I make a lot of southeast asian cuisine so I inadvertently make a lot of vegan dishes.

EDIT: Though I usually make some meat on the side for people who just got to eat "something real"

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Honestly, I've found that my friends who eat meat have been extremely accepting of my food, even if they're the sorts who'd usually eat mostly meat. I think the thing that worked for me was to make things that are vegan to begin with, rather than try to imitate things that they've been used to eating all their lives. So if I make up a batch of dosa and the potatoes that go with them, it's a completely new experience and not something that can be dismissed as "not as good as the real thing".

Mind you, I'll make seitan (from vital wheat gluten) for my husband, because I know he enjoys seitan.

I'll put it this way. When my mum was entertaining friends who were clueless Americans (sorry, but that's the only word I can think of), she wouldn't go through the trouble of making specific South Indian dishes that she knew they wouldn't appreciate. The same goes for clueless Indians.

She told me a story about a time she had a friend coming over back when she was in Delhi. She found a recipe for macaroni and cheese in the pressure cooker so that it gets the crispy topping like if you'd baked it in the oven (most Indian homes don't have an oven). It took her the better part of two or three hours to make, because she had to search up and down the shops to find the cheese, and the macaroni, and go through the whole rigamarole of making the thing. The friend came over, and poured rasam over it, and said that the weird rice was lovely.

So that seitan thing that I make for my husband, which takes no time at all to mix up, but has a pressure cooking step and a roasting step, isn't something I'd make for someone who's going to think of it as a fake meat, or a less than thing. I'd sooner make it for my husband, who's going to see it as its own thing, and enjoy it as such. There are bunches of really fun recipes that don't involve Weird Vegan Ingredients™ which will be delicious and filling.

I've found that with groups of people who generally are on those meat-heavy diets, making lots of different varieties, so that there's plenty to try makes it so that everyone gets full before they get a chance to try all the varieties. For example, my friend T------ had a party at her house for her dog. She wanted me to come over and help her make different varieties of noodles (because the dog's name is Noodles). We made pad thai, vegetable and pasta salad of some sort, a stir-fry, tteok guk, a vegan macaroni and cheese thing (it's a recipe I've been making for ages with coconut milk, and comes out lovely), a noodle kugel, and a couple of other dishes that I can't recall. Also, cake in the shape of a bowl, with frosting on top in the shape of noodles. There were so many different kinds of things to try that by the time everyone got to the end of the first round of dishes, they were full regardless of what their diets are. Mind you, T------'s friends run the gamut from picky to adventurous, so we wanted to have enough things that are interesting and appealing looking, so that everyone could have something they can gravitate towards. It was a lot of fun too!

Your mileage will vary. If your friends are assholes, there's not much to be done for it.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Does that mean you have a vegan kugel recipe? Or was the kugel not vegan?

Yolo Swaggins Esq
Jan 29, 2015


dino. posted:

Honestly, I've found that my friends who eat meat have been extremely accepting of my food, even if they're the sorts who'd usually eat mostly meat. I think the thing that worked for me was to make things that are vegan to begin with, rather than try to imitate things that they've been used to eating all their lives. So if I make up a batch of dosa and the potatoes that go with them, it's a completely new experience and not something that can be dismissed as "not as good as the real thing".

Mind you, I'll make seitan (from vital wheat gluten) for my husband, because I know he enjoys seitan.

I'll put it this way. When my mum was entertaining friends who were clueless Americans (sorry, but that's the only word I can think of), she wouldn't go through the trouble of making specific South Indian dishes that she knew they wouldn't appreciate. The same goes for clueless Indians.

She told me a story about a time she had a friend coming over back when she was in Delhi. She found a recipe for macaroni and cheese in the pressure cooker so that it gets the crispy topping like if you'd baked it in the oven (most Indian homes don't have an oven). It took her the better part of two or three hours to make, because she had to search up and down the shops to find the cheese, and the macaroni, and go through the whole rigamarole of making the thing. The friend came over, and poured rasam over it, and said that the weird rice was lovely.

So that seitan thing that I make for my husband, which takes no time at all to mix up, but has a pressure cooking step and a roasting step, isn't something I'd make for someone who's going to think of it as a fake meat, or a less than thing. I'd sooner make it for my husband, who's going to see it as its own thing, and enjoy it as such. There are bunches of really fun recipes that don't involve Weird Vegan Ingredients™ which will be delicious and filling.

I've found that with groups of people who generally are on those meat-heavy diets, making lots of different varieties, so that there's plenty to try makes it so that everyone gets full before they get a chance to try all the varieties. For example, my friend T------ had a party at her house for her dog. She wanted me to come over and help her make different varieties of noodles (because the dog's name is Noodles). We made pad thai, vegetable and pasta salad of some sort, a stir-fry, tteok guk, a vegan macaroni and cheese thing (it's a recipe I've been making for ages with coconut milk, and comes out lovely), a noodle kugel, and a couple of other dishes that I can't recall. Also, cake in the shape of a bowl, with frosting on top in the shape of noodles. There were so many different kinds of things to try that by the time everyone got to the end of the first round of dishes, they were full regardless of what their diets are. Mind you, T------'s friends run the gamut from picky to adventurous, so we wanted to have enough things that are interesting and appealing looking, so that everyone could have something they can gravitate towards. It was a lot of fun too!

Your mileage will vary. If your friends are assholes, there's not much to be done for it.

Can I get that vegan macaroni cheese recipe? That sounds amazing.

When I saw that there was a vegan food thread, my immediate thought was "God I hope dino comes in with delicious indian food". So i'm now feeling both very happy, and slightly creepy.

ZetsurinPower
Dec 14, 2003

I looooove leftovers!

I'm not vegan, and I find most meat-substitute recipes to be offensively bad. I prefer to eat vegan food that is good on its own merits, but this is a rare exception.

Vegan Pulled "Pork" BBQ Jackfruit
http://www.moreveganblog.com/2014/0...lled-jackfruit/

I made this again with some friends last night, and it was a hit. Used Stubb's BBQ sauce which was pretty solid. From the last time I made it:

Instead of simmering the jackfruit in broth, I removed this step altogether. I want crispy caramelized "meat" and boiling is going the wrong direction.
I used a salad spinner, then spread the jackfruit on a few layers of paper towel and patted it down to remove as much moisture as possible before tossing with the spices.
Next time I will add tomato paste and MSG to this spice mix to up the umami quotient. I also toyed with the idea of adding melted butter or shortening to introduce some fat & richness that is otherwise missing.
Use a good amount of oil/butter during pan frying. Don't burn anything.
Use just enough sauce to bind the fruit and then make sure it roasts until caramelized.

I found it to be most convincing when served with pickles and slaw. A buttered, toasted bun also goes a long way. The key is to add as many other elements as possible to distract from the lack of pork (just being honest).

We did half of it with a Mustard BBQ sauce that was a hit, but I preferred the spicy Sweet Baby Rays version.

Next time I'm going to make Jackfruit "char siu" bao, which might be a pretty decent adaptation.

ZetsurinPower fucked around with this message at Jul 8, 2015 around 19:56

grandpas drunk
Jun 10, 2015

by Ralp


Can vegans eat bugs? They don't have real brains and are an extremely sustainable source of protein.

If you're against eatting bugs you are, imo, part of the problem and not the solution

General Emergency
Apr 2, 2009

Can we talk?

Bugs are animals so I don't think most vegans would eat them. Depends on why you are a vegan I guess. Bugs are indeed the most sustainable way to get animal protein and it'd be good if more people ate them. I know I would if they were available even though I eat vegan otherwise.

Still in a thread about vegan food you won't find recipes for candied ants . A bug-cooking thread would be super cool though.

I've recently tried out some different types of tempeh. Tempeh is a traditional Indonesian type of fermented soy. Being made from soy it's very high in protein. If you are a fan of fermented foods tempeh might be something you'd enjoy. Definitely not for everyone but I'm kinda liking it.

Anyone have good recipes for it though? I've just used it in stir fries and such so far.

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


TychoCelchuuu posted:

Does that mean you have a vegan kugel recipe? Or was the kugel not vegan?

It was vegan! I'll ask my friend for the recipe. We found some wider noodles at the Chinese market and they worked great.

The Mac and cheese is on my blog under Dino's Mac and cheese. :3

a forbidden love
Apr 28, 2005

"It was never meant to beep boop be"

Thanks for making this thread! I can't wait to see what y'all post.

I recently stopped eating meat, eggs, and dairy; I plan on executing this diet change for at least a year (2 months down 10 to go). I still eat honey on my banana pancakes so I guess in the strictest sense of the word I'm not "vegan", but the rest of my diet is completely vegan. I'm lazy when it comes to cooking but I'm lucky enough to be stationed in San Diego where vegan and vegan friendly vegetarian restaurants are plentiful. That being said I still like lot's of variety and sometimes Native Cafe, as delicious as it is, gets a bit repetitive. So, if it's cool with the OP could we also post hidden gems that serve vegan food and we've been to?

My go to recipe recently has been lentil chili. You can swap the beans for any hardy bean and the lentil for any variety as well. The best thing about the recipe is that it doesn't need to be perfect or precise.

2 cups (or whatever) of dry lentils
2 cups " " dry beans of your choice. I stick with red or pinto.
2 large diced red potatoes or a couple of the little red, purple, and blue ones (also diced).
2 chopped carrots
3 diced roma tomatoes
1 chopped onion
some wine
some oil, I use avocado oil because it has a high smoke point.
some cloves of chopped/crushed/minced garlic
some tomato paste
some tomato sauce
about 2 cups water

Sort and soak beans and lentils for about 2 hours the longer the better, drain and then:

This next part may happen fast so be ready

Put about a tbsp of oil in a saute pan and sweat the onions on med-to-hi heat.
Add garlic.
When the onions begin to caramelize add about 2 second of wine, stir and make sure you scrape the bottom of the pan until nothing is stuck to the bottom.

Throw in the rest of the ingredients, just make sure you add the water slowly making sure to cover the food with about .5 to 1 inch of water. Combine and mix well. Bring to a rolling boil then reduce heat to simmer until the beans and lentils are soft. For me it's usually about 40 minutes.

The beans are the hardest thing to get right, though it's been my experience that the longer the soak the better they'll cook. You could also used canned beans instead.

Serve with sliced avocados and tortilla chips/pita chips/vegan garlic naan bread.

I also use daiya "cheeze" on the chili and I love it.

grandpas drunk
Jun 10, 2015

by Ralp


I turned vegan and now I need to poop and jack off at the same time what has this lifestyle done to me I am becoming a monster!!!!

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004

RAAAAARGH!!!! GIFT CARDS ARE FUCKING RETARDED!!!!

(I need a hug)


I'm a doctor on the internet. You need a dose of chilli peppers. Go buy some fresh chillies to chop up and practice your chopping for 1hr, or lube up with a good hot sauce for a quickie.

bartlebee
Nov 5, 2008


All right, dino, you son of a bitch, I'm finally gonna buy your book because of this thread. I'll try to post some of my butcherings of your recipes. You get a decent percentage of sales on the kindle version?

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


bartlebee posted:

All right, dino, you son of a bitch, I'm finally gonna buy your book because of this thread. I'll try to post some of my butcherings of your recipes. You get a decent percentage of sales on the kindle version?

Yeah, the e-books give me a higher percentage of royalty.

THAT SAID. The mac and cheese recipe is on the blog only, as is the lemon rice.

Lemon rice is one of those things that's so simple that I never thought anyone would want a recipe for it. So the lovely Toast put it up on the wiki:

http://goonswithspoons.com/Lemon_Rice

Like, seriously, when someone asked me for the recipe, I was baffled, because it'd be like asking someone for a recipe to make pasta with garlic and oil. You make a pasta, and put garlic and oil on it, and some herbs you have lying around. My mum would make it for potlucks and temple events, because it was something that was inexpensive enough that she could afford to make it for a large quantity of people. All the other foods, like daal, or vegetables would end up costing too much in ingredients, and our family was way too poor for that to happen.

It's not that I got sick of it, but I thought of it as really common, basic food that you make when you don't have anything in the house. In Florida, you always have citrus fruits lying around. Worst comes to it, you go to the neighbour's house and pick some lemons. We also always had the spices in the house so that was easy enough too. If I don't have ginger, I leave it out. However, it really is delicious when you do add it in. If I don't have nuts, I leave those out. I never have curry leaves, so my lemon rice has been made without curry leaves since I left Florida back in 2007. If you can find it, go for it.

Basically, the important parts are:
- rice
- mustard seed
- cumin seed
- turmeric
- lemon juice (you can use bottled if you live in an area where the lemons are terrible)

Everything else is just bonus.

Bear in mind that in the variations, I have very nontraditional things to do if you're not fussed about tradition, and just want something tasty.

Illinois Smith
Nov 15, 2003

Ninety-one? There are ninety other "Tiger Drivers"? Do any involve actual tigers, or driving?


I've tried it with and without nuts and they really make a difference.

bartlebee
Nov 5, 2008


dino. posted:

Yeah, the e-books give me a higher percentage of royalty.


Solid. Bought your book today. Gonna have to sort my way through it and hopefully I'll have the guts to start cooking from it in the next week or two.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



Make the kale soup ASAP. It is very good.

Beholderess
Jul 19, 2015


I am not vegan in any way, shape or form but my quest for healthy-ish desserts often brings me to vegan blogs. This one minute chocolate cake in a mug is so worth it http://chocolatecoveredkatie.com/20...chocolate-cake/

jamesnnnnn
May 11, 2014


hi folks,

i was vegan for a couple of years but stopped earlier this year after being diagnosed with a vitamin d deficiency. at the moment i'm leaning towards getting back into it - currently vegan + eggs, i'm a good vegetarian but not have never been a 'perfect' vegan.

does anyone have any advice for getting enough vitamin d or advice on avoiding any other possible pitfalls? eggs have most of the vitamins (i think) which is why i'm including them at the moment. i live in the uk so can't just lay around in the sun all day

on topic - food wise miso aubergine is a favourite:

http://www.azeliaskitchen.net/nasu-...azed-aubergine/

add chilli oil to the glaze and i think i'd actually grill (broil) it for a while (15) once the glaze is added. i also just half the aubergine's but not really sure that makes a difference

i also enjoyed dino's sambhar recently, very pleased with my cookbook purchase!

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


jamesnnnnn posted:

hi folks,

i was vegan for a couple of years but stopped earlier this year after being diagnosed with a vitamin d deficiency. at the moment i'm leaning towards getting back into it - currently vegan + eggs, i'm a good vegetarian but not have never been a 'perfect' vegan.

does anyone have any advice for getting enough vitamin d or advice on avoiding any other possible pitfalls? eggs have most of the vitamins (i think) which is why i'm including them at the moment. i live in the uk so can't just lay around in the sun all day


from the wikipedia page:
Very few foods contain vitamin D; synthesis of vitamin D (specifically cholecalciferol; a.k.a., the one you need most) in the skin is the major natural source of the vitamin. Dermal synthesis of vitamin D from cholesterol is dependent on sun exposure.

question from me:
did you or a docter decide that your "vitamin D deficiency diagnosis" was a reason to quit being vegan?
because that really doesn't make any sense.

Anyway: eat mushrooms, tofu, (eggs and cheese), for example,
or eat vitamin D supplements, like you need to do (again) by the time you're 50 anyway (most people don't even know about that)
but the main thing is to step out into the sun, preferably with bare arms and legs as much as you can. You don't have to "lay around" for that, it wouldn't hurt to get on a bike instead of sitting in a car every chance you get, for example. Also, you should do sports anyway, so do them outside. It's that simple.

You live in a part of the world where a large part of the people is "vitamin D deficient", and it is very popular to get a "diagnosis" for it nowadays. Truth is, that grown up people with actual problems due to vitamin D deficiency, do not really benefit from being supplemented.

paraquat fucked around with this message at Jul 28, 2015 around 13:38

jamesnnnnn
May 11, 2014


my doctor was very good and didn't suggest i should change my diet - when i had finished my vitamin d supplements they said that if i were to continue being vegan i should keep on taking supplements - as i had already stopped i was okay to not take them anymore. it was completely my decision to stop being vegan.

i walk to work - about 40 minutes each way - and run maybe twice a week. to get around i mainly walk but will occasionaly take the bus so at the moment i'm thinking it may be beneficial to supplement a bit.

thanks for the response paraquat! i'm interested to hear if anyone else has had any similar issues/solutions

who has some good mushroom recipes?

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


jamesnnnnn posted:

when i had finished my vitamin d supplements they said that if i were to continue being vegan i should keep on taking supplements...

....
who has some good mushroom recipes?

Your diet does not matter when it comes to vitamin D deficiency (well, except for supplements with vitamin D3, which is what you need (D3 I mean)).
Considering your location, the fact that you're outside a lot already and your previous deficiency, you might want to take supplements anyway, although I wouldn't worry about it too much.

Now, mushrooms.........I think almost all food is great, but mushrooms rule.
It shouldn't be hard to find recipes, especially as a vegan/vegetarian (I grew up in an age where every vegetarian restaurant meal would either be something with mushrooms or something with goats cheese....or both. That's pretty much why I decided that i should stick to omnivorism)

This one is nice and festive though (and Christmas isn't needed)
http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/...AToz3QFVd4LF.97
(I must admit that I've only had it with a regular egg/cream filling)

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Higher effort mushroom recipe:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...lab-recipe.html

Lower effort mushroom recipes:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...hio-recipe.html
https://vegan8korean.wordpress.com/...shrooms-recipe/
https://vegan8korean.wordpress.com/...hot-pot-recipe/

And a recipe from Cook Eat Thrive, a fine vegan cookbook:

quote:

1 tablespoon olive oil
˝ medium onion, diced
5 cloves garlic, minced
2 pounds assorted mushrooms (I like a combination of cremini, button, and portabella), wiped clean and sliced
3 tablespoons vermouth (dry sherry is a fine substitution)
3/4 cup wild rice
4 cups mushroom or vegetable broth
2 cups water
1 teaspoon sea salt
˝ teaspoon dried thyme
˝ teaspoon ground black pepper

In a large stockpot over medium-high heat, sauté the onion and garlic in olive oil until softened and the onions go translucent, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms, along with a generous pinch of sea salt. The mushrooms will remain firm and dry for several minutes, then begin to sweat, and eventually soften and release their liquid. Stir gently throughout this process, which will take about 5 minutes. Once this happens, cook 5 minutes more. Drizzle in vermouth, and cook for another 3 minutes.

Add the wild rice to the mixture; it will still be full of dark liquid that hasn’t yet evaporated. Cook, stirring constantly, for 3 to 5 minutes more. Add the stock, water, sea salt, thyme, and pepper. Bring to a simmer, then reduce the heat to low. Cover and simmer until rice is fully cooked, about 45 minutes.

Ladle into warmed bowls and serve with a hearty loaf of bread.

The cookbook Ottolenghi also has a couple nice vegan (or easily turned vegan) mushroom recipes, and it's a really great cookbook, although it's not vegan at all - like 2/3rds is about meat or something.

jamesnnnnn
May 11, 2014


thanks both - all the recipes look great (:

Sextro
Aug 23, 2014


Anyone have an idea about recipes for imitations of

http://www.madebylukas.com/

?

I feel like this might be near the line of "Real Food" but I would like to point out these aren't trying to imitate meat at all and instead are a way of presenting vegetable flavors in the format of a burger.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

They list all their ingredients on the website so just like, mix that stuff together until it tastes right, I guess.

The Creature
Nov 23, 2014


Does anyone have a vegan cupcake recipe? One of my clients has a birthday in the office on Monday, and they have asked me to see if I could come up with anything.

Yes_Cantaloupe
Feb 28, 2005



The Creature posted:

Does anyone have a vegan cupcake recipe? One of my clients has a birthday in the office on Monday, and they have asked me to see if I could come up with anything.

I have no idea where it originally came from, as it was just passed from friend to friend, but:

cupcakes posted:

1 1/2 cup flour
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup coca powder
1 tsp baking soda
1/3 cup oil (coconut is good, but it's pretty forgiving - not olive oil, I'd think)
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp white vinegar
1 cup water

Preheat to 350°F
Mix dry ingredients, add wet, mix it all up
Ladle into papers in the pan, bake for ~25 minutes.

This'll yield somewhere between a dozen and a dozen and a half cupcakes, depending on how full you ladle it. It also works great as a not-cup-cake, put in the proper pan and baked for more like 40-45 minutes. That is in fact how this recipe began its life.

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004

RAAAAARGH!!!! GIFT CARDS ARE FUCKING RETARDED!!!!

(I need a hug)


What's everyone's favorite hummus recipe?
I just had hummus and some celery for dinner today and was just winging it from memory.

I used 3/4 cup chana dal (it's peeled and split chickpeas so quicker cook time and you don't have to worry about skins)
juice of 1/2 a lemon (need more acidity in the end so I added 1T of vinegar as well, but the juice of a whole lemon would be better and not need any vinegar)
1tsp cumin seeds crushed in a mortar and pestle
1/4 t salt
2 T of some old tahini I homemade a couple of months ago (it's only sesame seeds and oil and keeps for ages in the fridge)
pinch of black pepper
pinch strongly smoked paprika
3 cloves garlic (found it very strong, suggest 2)
1/4 t smoked dried yellow 7 pot chilli pepper (add whatever chilli you like, I only needed 1/4 t since these are 800000 shus)
dash olive oil

I pressure cooked the channa dal (unsoaked) for 9 min, chilled them and reserved 1/4 cup of cooking water (chilled that too)

Blended everything, ate 2 celery sticks with hummus, feel pretty boss. (My partner went out for dinner with their family, leaving me home alone). They all wanted to go to a $45 buffet. gently caress that, bit too pricey for me and I don't eat that much, I hate buffets, and all you can eat places are a rip off in prices here.

Fo3 fucked around with this message at Aug 2, 2015 around 11:32

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

This is the hummus I always make, although I don't soak or peel the chickpeas - I just cook them for a bit more than an hour in a pressure cooker.

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BottledBodhisvata
Jul 26, 2013

by Lowtax


I am not vegan, but my girlfriend is vegetarian with a desire to one day go all vegan. While you all will pry my butter from my cold, dead, buttery hands, I would like to learn some actually tasty and not soy-steak-reliant vegan dishes to make at home for her, so I'll be following this thread with interest.

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