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Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

Knockknees posted:

Maybe try more salt? Or using a veggie broth/bullion to cook your rice/lentils in? Adjust the spice proportions? Aside from the salt and pepper those are all pretty earthy spices to go along with the earthy lentils, so maybe adding some lemon would help brighten it up.

Salt did help, and cooking it with stock will probably help a lot with that, so I'll try that next time. The lemon is a good suggestion too, I'll put some on the leftovers and see how that goes.


Skwirl posted:

Potato chips are vegan.

A surprising amount of them contain dairy, but there are usually plenty of vegan varieties.

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angor
Nov 14, 2003
teen angst

Zenithe posted:

Salt did help, and cooking it with stock will probably help a lot with that, so I'll try that next time. The lemon is a good suggestion too, I'll put some on the leftovers and see how that goes.


A surprising amount of them contain dairy, but there are usually plenty of vegan varieties.

Salt will definitely help. I find tossing in a bay leaf when cooking lentils is a pro move. Really brings out that earthy-ness in the lentils.

Skwirl
May 13, 2007

No you're wrong

Zenithe posted:

Salt did help, and cooking it with stock will probably help a lot with that, so I'll try that next time. The lemon is a good suggestion too, I'll put some on the leftovers and see how that goes.


A surprising amount of them contain dairy, but there are usually plenty of vegan varieties.

The ranch and cheese flavored ones.

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

Skwirl posted:

The ranch and cheese flavored ones.

Lime and black pepper
Rosemary Garlic and thyme
Sweet Chilli Jam

All contain milk products. I don't know why, but there they are.

Zanna
Oct 9, 2012


Zenithe posted:

Lime and black pepper
Rosemary Garlic and thyme
Sweet Chilli Jam

All contain milk products. I don't know why, but there they are.

From what I've read, lactose is sometimes used to mellow acidity in some chip seasoning blends, and buttermilk powder is used in some types to provide a more rounded acidity. Not really finding any reasons beyond that, though I'm sure there are.

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

Zenithe posted:

Salt did help, and cooking it with stock will probably help a lot with that, so I'll try that next time. The lemon is a good suggestion too, I'll put some on the leftovers and see how that goes.


A surprising amount of them contain dairy, but there are usually plenty of vegan varieties.

Every time I cook something simple like that I always use stock, plenty of seasoning and finish with lemon and a green. A vinegar can work as long if it's a nice one, but lemon is the best. For a green - spinach, silverbeet, kale, mustard greens, beet greens etc

Catfishenfuego
Oct 21, 2008

Moist With Indignation


Eat The Rich posted:

I made this beautiful pot of perfection; it lasted me like 2 days even though it took a whole day to make but it was so good. Any idea what kind of dish this is so I can look up more recipes like it?

Also does anyone have recommendations for vegan snacks? I get the munchies and for some reason, I am usually very lazy at the time. The vegan candy options are basically shaped sugar and taffy. I'm thinking I might make my own trail mix.

almonds, cajun spice/some other tasty vegan spice mix, nutritional yeast, a bit of salt if needed, toss the nuts in oil, sprinkle with the other stuff, toast on a very low temperature for about half an hour in the oven. Works with most nute but almonds or cashews are my fave.

crowtribe
Apr 2, 2013

I'm noice, therefore I am.


I'm off to an Ethiopian restaurant tonight for a friend's 30th dinner (http://thehorncafe.com.au/menu) - is there something on here that I definitely should not miss out on?

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

A middle eastern grocer near me sells dried soybeans. Are these actually used in any recipes, or is this just for making homemade tofu or something.

Every recipe I found was either dumb hipster stuff or just a different bean dish with soybeans instead (which I guess is fine)

Ras Het
May 23, 2007

when I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child - but now I am a man.


Zenithe posted:

A middle eastern grocer near me sells dried soybeans. Are these actually used in any recipes, or is this just for making homemade tofu or something.

Every recipe I found was either dumb hipster stuff or just a different bean dish with soybeans instead (which I guess is fine)

In Asia soybeans are considered hard to digest as-is, so they're usually made into tofu or fermented. All of the fermented products (natto, tempeh, the various sauces) are pretty involved to make and require you to order bacteria online so, yeah, for real heads only. Tofu is relatively simple to make though

You can use them as you would any bean, but they have almost no taste and take like a million hours to cook

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

Yeah, I bought some ages ago to make soy milk and tofu. I tried a couple of times but stopped bothering.
I tried them as a regular bean substitute and they were underwhelming to eat like that. About a year later they became a pantry moth breeding ground so I threw them out and I doubt I'd ever buy them again.
I found out later they are best roasted if not making milk or tofu.

Fo3 fucked around with this message at Feb 23, 2018 around 13:35

Enfys
Feb 17, 2013

A yak is born

Eat The Rich posted:


Also does anyone have recommendations for vegan snacks? I get the munchies and for some reason, I am usually very lazy at the time. The vegan candy options are basically shaped sugar and taffy. I'm thinking I might make my own trail mix.

Baba ghanoush - it's similar to hummus but made with eggplants instead of chickpeas. I love eggplant and grow/buy them constantly, and it's just another amazing way of enjoying them. It's great with veggies or flatbread as well.

Enfys fucked around with this message at Feb 23, 2018 around 14:04

Elizabethan Error
May 18, 2006



Zenithe posted:

It was for a dessert. For most recipes that call for butter for use as the fat, I just use oil (and did before I cared about not using butter too now I think about it). I've read so many different things to use instead but I'm not sure which one to go for.
bit late responding, but refined coconut oil sounds about right for this. curdled soy milk can add a 'buttery' flavor if desired

Major Ryan
May 10, 2008

Completely blank

crowtribe posted:

I'm off to an Ethiopian restaurant tonight for a friend's 30th dinner (http://thehorncafe.com.au/menu) - is there something on here that I definitely should not miss out on?

I think injera's the staple thing, which it looks like you're getting anyway.

I'd go for one of their Wot dishes although that's just personal preference. And now I'm massively jealous because I've never had restaurant Ethiopian food and it sounds wonderful.

Skwirl
May 13, 2007

No you're wrong

Major Ryan posted:

I think injera's the staple thing, which it looks like you're getting anyway.

I'd go for one of their Wot dishes although that's just personal preference. And now I'm massively jealous because I've never had restaurant Ethiopian food and it sounds wonderful.

If you live in/near a decent sized city it shouldn't be hard to find.

crowtribe
Apr 2, 2013

I'm noice, therefore I am.


Well, we got like a banquet plate of food with a tonne of injera. It was all amazing.

Will be returning or at least going to the other Ethiopian restaurant a bit closer to me in future, because it was extremely my jam.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

There's a link to a bunch of Ethiopian recipes in the OP. They're annoyingly in video form, but they at least give you titles of things to look up on Google and so on.

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

Had some mixed success with some lentil burgers, or rather, lentil hash.

1 cup dried lentil of choice (I used channa dal, which I think is the split inside of a chickpea?)
1 1/2 tablespoons of soy sauce
1 tablespoon of toasted sesame seeds
1/2 a cup of oats (I used the smashed up type that cooks faster)
1 diced onion
1 diced carrot.
salt, pepper

Fry carrot and onion until soft.
Shape everything into patties which immediately break into a dozen pieces and fry it up.

Tasted great, but wasn't according to plan.

Zenithe fucked around with this message at Mar 4, 2018 around 10:03

paraquat
Nov 25, 2006

Burp


Needs a bit of flour (normal or chickpea flour (aka gram flour))

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

Zenithe posted:

Had some mixed success with some lentil burgers, or rather, lentil hash.

1 cup dried lentil of choice (I used channa dal, which I think is the split inside of a chickpea?)
1 1/2 tablespoons of soy sauce
1 tablespoon of toasted sesame seeds
1/2 a cup of oats (I used the smashed up type that cooks faster)
1 diced onion
1 diced carrot.
salt, pepper

Fry carrot and onion until soft.
Shape everything into patties which immediately break into a dozen pieces and fry it up.

Tasted great, but wasn't according to plan.

Channa dal is split chickpeas, but not the regular large ones, they are desi chickpeas (smaller and have a dark skin). Regular chickpeas have white/light skin and are larger so they are usually kept whole. Similar flavour but not quite as 'nutty'.
I've used chana dal as a substitute for chickpeas a few times as they cook quick from dry and it's faster to make hummus with them compared to dry chickpeas

E: also I mentioned this before, don't precook the onion next time. Just grate it and add raw and it's gooey liquid works well as a binder.

Fo3 fucked around with this message at Mar 4, 2018 around 13:28

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

paraquat posted:

Needs a bit of flour (normal or chickpea flour (aka gram flour))

Fo3 posted:

E: also I mentioned this before, don't precook the onion next time. Just grate it and add raw and it's gooey liquid works well as a binder.

Will try both of these next time, thanks guys!

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

It's in the OP, but I'm gonna plug Veg Recipes of India as a really good source of recipes.

Nothing fancy, but I've got a bunch of meals from there in my rotation, and they all taste great.

e. I started linking recipes, but most of it is in the Dal Recipes section.

Zenithe fucked around with this message at Mar 11, 2018 around 08:21

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Their samosa recipe is great. I make a big batch and freeze them after the first round of frying, then I bake or fry them when I want to eat them.

dino.
Mar 28, 2010


Zenithe posted:

I made some Mujaddara, which was actually pretty bad. I made it with brown rice instead of white, but I was amazed how little flavour was in it.

1 cup rice
1 1/2 cups green lentils
Cumin, Allspice, Cinnamon, Turmeric, salt and pepper
Caramelised onions both in the dish and used as a garnish.

There is a version of this recipe which owns, but that was not the one I made tonight. If anyone has had some success with this I'd love the recipe.

- How much onion. This is important. If you say 1, do you mean 1 BIIIIG onion, 1 medium onion, or 1 shallot sized disappointment? Spoiler alert: the answer should not be 1. That's like making an Italian dish that calls for 1 clove of garlic.
- Ground spices, or whole spices? The cumin should be whole seeds. The rest are fine as powder.
- Did the spices ever get bloomed in fat? How much fat? If you can get your hands on whole cumin, give them a quick once over with a pestle and mortar. Pour in enough olive oil into a wide, shallow skillet so that it comes up about 1/2" or so. Get the oil heated on medium. Sprinkle generously with the crushed cumin. Add the turmeric when the cumin begins to sizzle. Stir to combine. The turmeric should be smelling earthy by now. You don't want to cook the turmeric more than like 5 - 10 seconds. Since it's ground, it cooks fast. Throw in roughly 3 - 4 medium onions, chopped. Add in allspice, salt, and a bit of pepper. Stir the onions.
- How dark did you take the onions? You need not go to the extent of practically blackened, but it does take a while. Supposedly a pinch of baking soda will accelerate the browning, but your mileage may vary.

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

- 3 medium red onions.
-whole cumin, ground pepper but freshly cracked, everything else ground.
-don't remember how much fat, but yes.
-Cooked the onions separately than the rest of the dish, and until they had lightly caramelised. A rough guess would be on low heat for about 15 minutes, but I don't remember.

The suggestions of salt/vinegar/lemon from the thread all improved it and helped balance the taste a lot. Next time it'll be much better.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Another food dump:


Krumplis tészta / Hungarian potato pasta. One of my new favorite comfort foods. Basically just pasta, potatoes, paprika, onions, garlic, and salt and pepper.


Breakfast many days: hash brown potatoes with some turmeric.


Cauliflower stir fry.


Pasta aglio e olio, made even more famous by the movie Chef.


This cake, which is pretty great, with coffee in place of the milk and more flour than the recipe calls for.

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



You seriously have the best vegan photodumps.

Shibawanko
Feb 13, 2013



Ras Het posted:

In Asia soybeans are considered hard to digest as-is, so they're usually made into tofu or fermented. All of the fermented products (natto, tempeh, the various sauces) are pretty involved to make and require you to order bacteria online so, yeah, for real heads only. Tofu is relatively simple to make though

You can use them as you would any bean, but they have almost no taste and take like a million hours to cook

I make natto at home, it's not that hard actually. All you need to buy are raw soybeans and a packet of premade natto for the bacteria, you don't need nattokin or anything complicated. You also kind of need a pressure cooker, in my country (Netherlands) almost everybody has one of these but that might not be true everywhere.

I can put up a recipe if anyone's interested:
Day 1: wash your hands well with soap or wear clean disposable gloves. Wash the soybeans in the manner of rice, just toss them around some water, get rid of the water until you're satisfied they're clean. Then submerge the beans in plenty of water and leave overnight to soak.

Day 2: after about 24 hours the beans should be big from soaking up water. Wash your hands. Drain the water they soaked in (you could also use it for the next step to save water, I guess, but I never do). Put them in a sieve inside of a pressure cooker so they don't touch the bottom of the pan, put some water in the bottom and set to boil until the pressure's on. Steam them on a low fire inside the pressurized pan for about an hour and a half. At the same time, boil some water in a teapot and use that boiling water to sterilize an oven tray. You want a tray that can hold the beans so there's maybe a layer of beans 2 to 3 cm high. When the beans are done, dump them in the tray and add the natto you bought from the store, mix well with a sterile (or at least very clean) spoon. The next part I found out is the most important: cover the layer of beans carefully with some transparent film so that there isn't much air over the beans, to keep in the moisture, I always poke a few small holes in this film for air, you'll notice that this is how natto is usually packed inside of a regular packet as well. Next, add some non-transparent aluminum foil with a few small holes for oxygen on top of that. The idea is to keep in moisture and keep out light. Put this whole tray in a place that's about 35 degrees C at all times. I simply put it in my oven on the "keep hot" function set to 35. I've found that the temperature is not as precise as some websites claim it is, you can just experiment with whatever equipment you have.

Day 3/4/5: After about 24 hours, check the consistency of the natto with a clean spoon by mixing it a bit to see if it's stringy. When It's very stringy and sticky, stick the tray in the fridge and leave it for another day or so, this makes it taste better. Then it's ready to eat, you can also freeze natto to use later for making more batches, the bacteria easily survive this.

So it's really not that hard. Basically it's: soak beans - steam beans - ferment. I do it all the time because I loving love natto. It also tastes better than storebought.

Alternatively, you could boil them for much longer in a regular pan, I've never done this myself but it supposedly takes about 5 hours or something, so that's way less practical.

Here's a picture, I've scooped out some of the natto here to put in a different container:

Shibawanko fucked around with this message at Mar 16, 2018 around 11:53

Skwirl
May 13, 2007

No you're wrong

When your instruction include the words "day 5" we're operating on wildly different definitions of "not that hard."

Ras Het
May 23, 2007

when I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child - but now I am a man.


It's the temperature part that I've been wary about, but if it's not that strict I'll definitely give it a whirl, particularly because those frozen natto packages always come with the frigging fish sauce package which makes me a poor vegan

Shibawanko
Feb 13, 2013



Skwirl posted:

When your instruction include the words "day 5" we're operating on wildly different definitions of "not that hard."

Well it's not very time consuming in the sense of stuff you actually have to do, you just wash and transfer beans 3 times and press a few buttons, the fermenting just takes a while but you have to do literally nothing!


Ras Het posted:

It's the temperature part that I've been wary about, but if it's not that strict I'll definitely give it a whirl, particularly because those frozen natto packages always come with the frigging fish sauce package which makes me a poor vegan

My oven's "keep hot" setting claims to run at 35 degrees, I don't know if that's actually accurate because ovens tend not to be at low temperatures and i've never bothered to measure. I think the ideal temperature is something like 37, body temperature, and any deviations from that might slow down the fermenting process but it won't actually gently caress it up unless it's way under or over. I used to wrap the tray in an electric blanket too which was a bit more cumbersome but also usually worked. A lot of websites are fussy about it but I found that as long as it's roughly body temperature it'll be fine.

What seems to be important is that they stay moist but not wet (no loose water) which is what the film is for, and also that they stay dark.

Shibawanko fucked around with this message at Mar 17, 2018 around 00:09

Doorknob Slobber
Sep 10, 2006





natto has to be one of the least appetizing looking foods

Shibawanko
Feb 13, 2013



Doorknob Slobber posted:

natto has to be one of the least appetizing looking foods

Not if it's well presented:


Natto tastes so good. Looking at pictures of rice with natto and some vegetables makes me really hungry.

You can also make sushi out of it.

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

For the first time since stopping eating animals things I'm heading away for a few days, so I'm asking if anyone has any good edible recipes you can make with only a microwave.

Imbroglio
Mar 8, 2013


Zenithe posted:

For the first time since stopping eating animals things I'm heading away for a few days, so I'm asking if anyone has any good edible recipes you can make with only a microwave.

My go-to travel foods are:
Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches
Nuts
Hummus + carrots, crackers, or a spoon
Canned beans
Canned soups
Oatmeal

mostly because they're all easy to find in a grocery store/friend's house and cheap.

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

I was all set to get some of that stuff, then they hosed up the room and now I get one with a stove and the worlds worst frying pan. Thanks for the suggestions though, I'll keep them in mind in case I don't get so lucky next time.

Piggy Smalls
Jun 21, 2015


My brother is coming today for Easter and he is a vegan. What can I make him to eat that isn’t too complicated but looks like I put some effort into it.

TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

Piggy Smalls posted:

My brother is coming today for Easter and he is a vegan. What can I make him to eat that isn’t too complicated but looks like I put some effort into it.
This is pretty easy but looks pretty effort-laden, I think.

Piggy Smalls
Jun 21, 2015


TychoCelchuuu posted:

This is pretty easy but looks pretty effort-laden, I think.

Looks yummy! May be too difficult but will save and make on another day when I got a bit more time. I think he’d love it.

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TychoCelchuuu
Jan 2, 2012

This space for Rent.

You can check the OP for a lot of recipes and links to places with recipes if you want to keep looking.

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