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mcswizzle
Jul 26, 2009


My first wedding anniversary is on the 16th and I am planning on cooking my wife a lamb based meal - she prefers lamb over pretty much every other protein source.

I've found a recipe that I like, but I don't want to limit myself in choice and don't want to bite off more than I can handle, so can you give me feedback on the recipe itself, it's difficulty, and alternatives for a relative novice?

For my experience, I haven't done much experimenting regarding cooking, but I'm good at the regular stuff. I am able to follow directions and have been getting better at time management in the kitchen (cooking things so they finish around the same time).

The recipe I found is:
  • Rub the shanks in some plain flour.
  • Drop a couple of tablespoons of olive oil into a heavy pot (cast iron or ceramic) and brown the shanks... then remove
  • Finely chop up 2-3 cloves of garlic and throw into the pot on moderate heat
  • At the slightest discoloration of the garlic, add in 500ml (2 cups) of red wine.
  • Add the shanks back in.
  • Throw in a few twigs of rosemary
  • Chop (thick) up some carrots and throw them in
  • Julienne one brown onion (google images for examples if not sure)
  • Have enough liquid in there to rise up to at least 70% of the sides of highest item protruding from your pool of wine - close to completely submerging them is better. If the wine didn't do it, you can add some decent chicken or vegetable stock in raise the levels that high.
  • Bring to the boil and then let simmer on low heat for 1.5-2 hours with the lid on
  • Check it halfway .. don't stir, just use some tongues to carefully rotate the lamb over onto its 'other side' and then replace lid for the duration of cooking.. 2 hours will be best.
  • Serve with some of the slow cooked potatoes and some potato mash.
  • Garnish the top of the lamb with some finely chopped flat leaf parsley
  • Afterthought: I served mine in a bowl. If you were to plate it, you may consider using whole dutch carrots instead... probably look a little fancier that chunky bits of carrot

Is this more than an inexperienced cook should attempt? Do you have alternatives/better suggestions? All are much appreciated

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Authentic You
Mar 4, 2007

Listen now this is your
captain calling:
Your captain is dead.


Sounds pretty straightforward to me. Braised lamb shanks are delicious and braised stuff in general is a good technique for beginners, in my opinion, because it's pretty easy to set up and forgiving on timing (the thing that I am most bad at).

The recipe itself is just fine in terms of components/flavor profile and described process, but it's written in a really disorganized way. Lots of random recipes you'll find are written by amateurs who might be fantastic cooks with good stuff to share, but don't know how to write instructions well. I've definitely been dicked over by random recipes on the internet, like seeing a surprise ingredient that I don't have way down in the text or doing the prep wrong because it was worded/termed poorly.

For this particular recipe:
--Extract the whole list of ingredients and list them together so you make sure you have everything. Also, note what you have to do to prepare each ingredient (it's going to suck when your garlic is already almost done and you still haven't julienned the onions yet)
--Gather and prepare/chop all your stuff BEFORE you start cooking and have it ready to toss in when the recipe says. Doing this has changed my cooking life.
--What type of cooking vessel do you have? If it's a cast iron or enameled cast iron dutch oven (OR a pre-1998 Corningware casserole dish - old school Corningware is basically the same stuff as the ceramic thermal shielding on space shuttles), stove top is fine. If it's a non-Corningware ceramic casserole dish thing, you can braise in the oven because you don't want your poo poo to shatter all over the stove top (so, in oven at 350 or whatever for a couple hours or more). I'm assuming the recipe writer is talking about Corningware when she/he mentions using a potentially ceramic vessel and then doing the thing on the stove top. And even if you use Corningware, might be better to just toss it in the oven.
--I didn't see any salt mentioned. Add some salt. Could be that the recipe writer is using cooking wine, which is loaded with salt, but I dunno.
--When I've braised lamb shanks I've used the better part of the bottle of wine, so that might be easier than using the 2 cups and then supplementing with broth (which you will have to buy, reconstitute from bullion, or make if you don't have it handy already)
--How many shanks is the recipe talking about? I'm presuming two. Still, seems skimpy on the garlic. I add at least six cloves for a pair of shanks. It cooks for a long time so the garlic mellows out a ton.

Personal suggestion: Lamb shanks are hella good served over polenta too (polenta is really easy and fast to make), so an alternative to consider.

mcswizzle
Jul 26, 2009


Authentic You posted:

but it's written in a really disorganized way

All of that advise is great, but this in particular stood out - and was what I was worried about. I was already planning on breaking down the recipe into its base components and then working my way back up, but I'm glad that I thought to ask.

The garlic I will very likely add more. I'm unreasonably into garlic.

Besides learning what juliening is (hooray google), I usually prep everything in advance. That has gone a long way to helping me manage my cook times better, and despite usually having relatively small ingredient lists it helps me be able to multitask while I'm cooking since I don't have to worry about having enough time before the next step comes.

I will most likely be borrowing a cast iron skillet. I have to verify it's deep enough for this, but I'm pretty confident it is. I'm not sure if my friend has a lid for it, would aluminum foil be sufficient as a replacement?

We have a few (I believe they are ceramic) dishes that we use - I'm not sure if they'd be right. I may use them if the cast iron skillet falls through or is insufficient, but I don't want to use it as a first choice.

I also like salt a lot. I'm like a deer, just salt everywhere.

Would using fancier red wine and adding salt change the flavor? I've never cooked with wine, so I'm not sure if the extra expense of getting a decent bottle would be worth doing over getting some cooking wine - bearing in mind that she prefers to drink white wine, so the leftover red would be effectively ignored until I run out of rum late enough into a bender.

Probably two-three shanks. Besides not knowing how much they cost yet, I feel like they tend to be small. I have an appetite that would be healthy for Andre the Giant, and so will probably end up eating more than my fair share, but I don't want her to have less because of that. If you use 6 cloves for 2 shanks, I will probably aim for around that ratio.

Thanks again for the advise. I'll be doing prep work soon so this was invaluable.

Authentic You
Mar 4, 2007

Listen now this is your
captain calling:
Your captain is dead.


For cooking vessel, a standard skillet isn't going to be deep enough - at the very least, you want a deep-dish skillet like this, or a full-blown dutch oven. If there's no lid, I suppose you could do foil - never done it but don't see how it could mess things up.

As for changing the flavor, adding salt will make it taste not-bland and make you not need to douse it with the salt shaker once you serve it. A nicer wine might make it marginally better, but the cheap stuff is just dandy for braising. I recommend the cheapest bottle of heavy Italian red you can find. In my personal opinion, I find that cheap-poo poo wines from Italy (or France) are better than similarly priced wine from the US and other places. Or if you have a Trader Joe's nearby and are not in Pennsylvania, pick up some Two Buck Chuck.

For lamb shanks, the fore shanks are small (but cheaper), and the hind shanks will be bigger and meatier (but more expensive. Depending on where you are and the market for lamb, you could be paying anywhere from $4/lb to $10/lb. I think last time I did shanks I paid $6/lb.

mcswizzle
Jul 26, 2009


That's awesome, thanks. I'll be doing some research and making a shopping list probably this weekend. I appreciate it, feel free to PM me if you have any other thoughts/recommendations - I may or may not remember to come back and check on this thread

Happy Hat
Aug 11, 2008

He just wants someone to shake his corks, is that too much to ask??


Not agreeing on the quality of the wine - I only cook with what I serve it with - mainly because I've hosed up some good dishes with braising in bad wine.

Wrt julienne the onion, don't care too much about that - after 2 hours of cooking it will not matter how you cut it. Furthermore I would probably brunoise all the veggies, then discard them after they've given taste to the dish, and then add in new veggies cut to a decent size (heavy chunks - this is a rustic dish) half an hour before finishing - I would add 10-12 scallots half an hour before and 4-5 carrots 15 minutes before finishing.

What is the slow cooked potato about?

Final thoughts on it would be that depending on the cooking vessel you will need to remove the shanks and everything else, leave them on the side, covered - reduce the sauce down to a syrup like consistency, add it all back in and heat for 5 minutes - that will bring the most intense flavor out. If you chose to do this, then do be careful about oversalting rather than under salting - since that will intensify everything.

It seems like a very doable dish, and there is the added benefit that if your gently caress it up, it will still be very well tasting.

Oh - and for fucks sake - add some rosemary!

Edit: just saw there was rosemary - sorry about that - add some more then!

pr0k
Jan 16, 2001

"Well if it's gonna be
that kind of party..."

Watch this three or four times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6TGGZrA_IM

Then do that.

Authentic You
Mar 4, 2007

Listen now this is your
captain calling:
Your captain is dead.


Happy Hat posted:

Not agreeing on the quality of the wine - I only cook with what I serve it with - mainly because I've hosed up some good dishes with braising in bad wine.

I can't bring myself to cook with what I serve. Because then I'll just serve it and do something that's not braising.

Also, I should clarify that the wines I pick out for braising are super cheap but still drinkable (I'll definitely sneak a glass while I'm cooking) and suitable to serve at a dinner party (though maybe as the third or fourth bottle you open) and come in proper 750ml bottles, not boxes or jugs. Besides, I've never gone wrong with a $7-8 bottle of red from Italy, France, or Chile for cooking (and probably also drinking while I'm cooking). US is hit or miss (fine if you know what labels are good for the price), but my bf and I have been burned by terrible Australian wine enough times that we just avoid it in general unless we get a specific recommendation, like, wouldn't even cook with it terrible.

pr0k posted:

Watch this three or four times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6TGGZrA_IM

Then do that.

This is a good video.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Authentic You posted:


This is a good video.

Your avatar and one of the presenter's shirts are similar enough that I did a double take.

Be brave, OP! We have faith in you. You can do this! My only tip is, when browing, be patient and don't crank the heat too high. Too little browning is fine, burnt is hard to fix. Same for the salt level. You can always add salt at the table. You can't get salt out.

Let us know how it goes!

Shbobdb
Dec 16, 2010

by Smythe


http://www.bourassavineyards.com/?m...sed-Lamb-Shanks

This recipe is pretty loving outstanding and pretty easy to make. You can use pretty much any Syrah (I'm actually a fan of using a nice jammy zin but that's just because it is what I had on hand the first time I made it and I've just kept going with it ever since). The pomegranate molasses is a bit of a specialty ingredient, but is easy to find at any Middle Eastern grocery store (someplace like whole foods might have it as well). You can swap out the pomegranate juice for a nice tart cranberry juice or (my personal favorite) sour cherry juice (available at Trader Joe's and most other decent-level grocery stores).

Serve it over some good couscous with scallions and raisins/craisins.

The actual recipe on the website is hilariously poorly written, so ignore it. Just combine all the ingredients for the marinade together and then use that to marinate the lamb shanks overnight.

Then combine all the ingredients for the braise, except the wine. Brown the lamb shanks, then deglaze the pan with the wine. Put the lamb shanks into the braise and combine with the wine used for deglazing. Braise the lamb for 3+ hours and it will be delicious. Just fall off the bone tender and really really delicious.

pr0k
Jan 16, 2001

"Well if it's gonna be
that kind of party..."

Yes and most importantly -there is no specific time when the meat will be done in a braise like this. It just depends. When you can gently tease a little piece of meat away from the bone it's done. If you have to use a knife it's not done yet. This is a thing that you can do early and reheat. Don't start three hours before dinner, take an hour to prep, and be sweating the fact that the meat's not done at dinnertime. Get done early, let the meat rest and cool in the braisnig liquid. Then reheat for service, still in the liquid. Plate the meat and veg, then strain and de-fat the liquid, sauce the meat and veg lightly, and serve the extra it in a gravyboat.

pr0k fucked around with this message at Aug 8, 2015 around 11:57

Disco Salmon
Jun 19, 2004


THIS is my all time favorite recipe for lamb... my family raves every time I make it. Even my husband who was a notorious hater of lamb in all forms of cooking likes it, and even asked for it to be his birthday dinner several times Nice thing is is that it is an easy recipe to do, so its a good recipe for babby's first lamb.

This particular recipe was found online through Google many many years ago. I don't have the link any more since it was originally saved on my old hard drive, but at least I had a hard copy saved! As much as I would love to take credit for this, I can't.

Best boneless leg of lamb for quality and price we have found is from Costco.

******************************

Marinated Leg of Lamb Done Greek Style

5 lb leg of lamb (boneless)
6 cloves, fresh garlic, slivered
2 tsp kosher salt
1 tsp fresh ground peppercorns
1/4 cup fresh oregano, finely chopped
2 fresh rosemary sprigs, removed from stem and finely chopped
1/4 cup fresh sweet basil, finely chopped
2 fresh lemons, squeezed and juiced, seeds removed
1/4 cup butter, melted
1/4 cup Italian olive oil
1 cup wine or apple juice

1. Wash meat well and pat dry. With a small knife cut incisions all over the leg of lamb where you will be putting small slivers of fresh garlic.

2. In small to medium size mixing bowl, combine salt, pepper, fresh oregano, rosemary, sweet basil, Italian olive oil, melted butter and garlic slivers.

3. With clean and washed hands, take the marinated garlic slivers and insert all over your leg of lamb where you have made the incisions.

4. After you've inserted as many of the marinated garlic slivers as you want into the meat, take the remaining ones left and gently crush with a fork and add to the olive oil mixture.

5. Place meat on rack in roasting pan. With remaining olive oil mixture rub all over the surface of your meat for a great seasoning rub.

6. Pour the juice of the fresh lemons over lamb and let sit and marinade for about 1 hour.

7. Cook at 375 F for about 1 hour. Lower heat to 325 - 350 F to cook slowly. Add your cup of wine (or apple juice but white wine is better!) and keep basting lamb until browned nicely and done to your taste for about another 1 - 1.5 hours.

Servings: 12

bombhand
Jun 27, 2004



pr0k posted:

Get done early, let the meat rest and cool in the braisnig liquid. Then reheat for service, still in the liquid. Plate the meat and veg, then strain and de-fat the liquid, sauce the meat and veg lightly, and serve the extra it in a gravyboat.
I like to braise ahead of time because it makes it super easy to defat. It floats to the top and solidifies in the fridge, easily scooped off before reheating.

Edit: Also, I like to put a scoop of marmite or vegemite into my braising liquid, depending on what else I'm putting in there.

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

bombhand posted:

I like to braise ahead of time because it makes it super easy to defat. It floats to the top and solidifies in the fridge, easily scooped off before reheating.

Edit: Also, I like to put a scoop of marmite or vegemite into my braising liquid, depending on what else I'm putting in there.

Is mar/vege-mite what normal people would call something like Better Than Bullion?

slinkimalinki
Jan 17, 2010


mcswizzle posted:



[*]Check it halfway .. don't stir, just use some tongues to carefully rotate the lamb over onto its 'other side' and then replace lid for the duration of cooking.. 2 hours will be best.


Whose tongue you going to use?

ColdPie
Jun 9, 2006



Hair Elf

That loving apostrophe is going to haunt my GWS browsing until this thread fall off the first page. Thanks, OP.

Cavenagh
Oct 9, 2007

Grrrrrrrrr.

Drifter posted:

Is mar/vege-mite what normal people would call something like Better Than Bullion?

Nope. Marmite / Vegemite is what normal people call Marmite or Vegemite. Normal being UK /Australia / New Zealand. It's a yeast spread that's pure savoury and just a little in a gravy or a braise brings depth.

pr0k
Jan 16, 2001

"Well if it's gonna be
that kind of party..."

Someone had to be hella drunk to think that the leftover mash from making beer was a good thing to eat.

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

pr0k posted:

Someone had to be hella drunk to think that the leftover mash from making beer was a good thing to eat.

'stralia, mate.

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


Grilled lamb chops are simple. Salt, pepper, garlic, rosemary, thyme. Place on a grill (hell, you can do them on a pan on the stove if you want) and cook them until medium-rare (just 3-4 minutes per side). Rest for a few minutes and enjoy.

sellouts
Apr 23, 2003



Happy Hat posted:

Not agreeing on the quality of the wine - I only cook with what I serve it with - mainly because I've hosed up some good dishes with braising in bad wine.

Can you go into this a bit further? Do you ever serve $40 bottles of wine (or more?)

I just don't see the logic when even Keller isn't specifying Opus One for his nonsense.

Secret Spoon
Mar 22, 2009



sellouts posted:

Can you go into this a bit further? Do you ever serve $40 bottles of wine (or more?)

I just don't see the logic when even Keller isn't specifying Opus One for his nonsense.

I mean, he's not saying buy abacus or anything. He is saying don't buy that 7$ chianti. I cook almost exclusively with cotes du rhone, and you can get decent bottles of that in the 15-18 range. A ~20$ bottle from the right region can easily fit into a budget and be used to cook with.

Now its just a matter of time before happy hat comes in and says he uses caymus special select as the base for all his red sauces.

pr0k
Jan 16, 2001

"Well if it's gonna be
that kind of party..."

mcswizzle posted:

That's awesome, thanks. I'll be doing some research and making a shopping list probably this weekend. I appreciate it, feel free to PM me if you have any other thoughts/recommendations - I may or may not remember to come back and check on this thread

someone pm him to check on the thread because I can't be arsed

DekeThornton
Sep 2, 2011

Be friends!


A lamb dish I made that I was really satisfied with I made with a cut that I'm not sure what the proper English name for is. In Swedish it was called lammtunnbringa, which translates to thin lamb brisket. It was pretty much a thin piece of fairly tough lamb brisket with skin on. I prepared it by rolling it up with a good amount of minced garlic, lemon zest, fresh rosemary and salt and pepper inside and then slow cooked it in a Römertopf for some hours until tender. Then I crisped up the skin and served it with cauliflower mash and a sauce made from the remaining lamb stock from cooking and a bit of red wine. Turned out really delicious and dead simple.

Edit -It looked something like this:

DekeThornton fucked around with this message at Aug 13, 2015 around 08:23

Cavenagh
Oct 9, 2007

Grrrrrrrrr.

Secret Spoon posted:

I mean, he's not saying buy abacus or anything. He is saying don't buy that 7$ chianti. I cook almost exclusively with cotes du rhone, and you can get decent bottles of that in the 15-18 range. A ~20$ bottle from the right region can easily fit into a budget and be used to cook with.

Now its just a matter of time before happy hat comes in and says he uses caymus special select as the base for all his red sauces.

The only things that really matter for wine you cook with is the sweetness and the acidity. A box is fine. So's cheap wine.

Secret Spoon
Mar 22, 2009



Cavenagh posted:

The only things that really matter for wine you cook with is the sweetness and the acidity. A box is fine. So's cheap wine.

nope. It all depends on what you want out of your sauce. If you are looking for something sweeter, then yeah, those are A++ good options. A 12$ bottle of shiraz or cotes du rhone will help you add layers to the sauce. I agree that you don't need to go past 20$. But to say that a box wine will enhance what your doing in the same way a decent bottle will, is wrong.

Acidity can also be tied to the age of the wine, so you can pick something that is meant to be tabled quickly. Like the bottles I mentioned.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


A box is nice as it won't oxidize easily. Maybe not a Franzia Chilled Red (even though that's the best for slap bag)

mcswizzle
Jul 26, 2009


I appreciate all the advice, and will take it into consideration while preparing. I'll try to remember to take pictures during the process but I don't know if I can actually force myself to take pictures of my food, even if it's relatively "reasonable".

Does anyone know of something I can do with white wine? My wife isn't a big fan of red wine generally, with few exceptions. She's got a lot more love for white wines (she likes Rieslings generally if that helps).

Disco Salmon posted:

THIS is my all time favorite recipe for lamb... my family raves every time I make it. Even my husband who was a notorious hater of lamb in all forms of cooking likes it, and even asked for it to be his birthday dinner several times Nice thing is is that it is an easy recipe to do, so its a good recipe for babby's first lamb.

This particular recipe was found online through Google many many years ago. I don't have the link any more since it was originally saved on my old hard drive, but at least I had a hard copy saved! As much as I would love to take credit for this, I can't.

Best boneless leg of lamb for quality and price we have found is from Costco.

******************************

Marinated Leg of Lamb Done Greek Style

5 lb leg of lamb (boneless)
6 cloves, fresh garlic, slivered
2 tsp kosher salt
1 tsp fresh ground peppercorns
1/4 cup fresh oregano, finely chopped
2 fresh rosemary sprigs, removed from stem and finely chopped
1/4 cup fresh sweet basil, finely chopped
2 fresh lemons, squeezed and juiced, seeds removed
1/4 cup butter, melted
1/4 cup Italian olive oil
1 cup wine or apple juice

1. Wash meat well and pat dry. With a small knife cut incisions all over the leg of lamb where you will be putting small slivers of fresh garlic.

2. In small to medium size mixing bowl, combine salt, pepper, fresh oregano, rosemary, sweet basil, Italian olive oil, melted butter and garlic slivers.

3. With clean and washed hands, take the marinated garlic slivers and insert all over your leg of lamb where you have made the incisions.

4. After you've inserted as many of the marinated garlic slivers as you want into the meat, take the remaining ones left and gently crush with a fork and add to the olive oil mixture.

5. Place meat on rack in roasting pan. With remaining olive oil mixture rub all over the surface of your meat for a great seasoning rub.

6. Pour the juice of the fresh lemons over lamb and let sit and marinade for about 1 hour.

7. Cook at 375 F for about 1 hour. Lower heat to 325 - 350 F to cook slowly. Add your cup of wine (or apple juice but white wine is better!) and keep basting lamb until browned nicely and done to your taste for about another 1 - 1.5 hours.

Servings: 12

I feel like this is actually similar to the recipe I think I landed on after further research (I ended up not having the cast iron pan available, but I do have a big roasting pan already). This is the recipe I found and have been planning - thoughts?

I didn't expect to get this many responses, so I'm going to dig into this tonight, watch that video and see what I come up with.

I also do not apologize for any errant apostrophes.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

Secret Spoon posted:

nope. It all depends on what you want out of your sauce. If you are looking for something sweeter, then yeah, those are A++ good options. A 12$ bottle of shiraz or cotes du rhone will help you add layers to the sauce. I agree that you don't need to go past 20$. But to say that a box wine will enhance what your doing in the same way a decent bottle will, is wrong.

Acidity can also be tied to the age of the wine, so you can pick something that is meant to be tabled quickly. Like the bottles I mentioned.

There's good bags of wine to make stuff with.

I also drink wine out of bags on a regular occasion but that's different.

Filboid Studge
Oct 1, 2010
And while they debated the matter among themselves, Conradin made himself another piece of toast.



pr0k posted:

Someone had to be hella drunk to think that the leftover mash from making beer was a good thing to eat.

It's not even that, it's basically boiled trub.

Cavenagh
Oct 9, 2007

Grrrrrrrrr.

Secret Spoon posted:

nope. It all depends on what you want out of your sauce. If you are looking for something sweeter, then yeah, those are A++ good options. A 12$ bottle of shiraz or cotes du rhone will help you add layers to the sauce. I agree that you don't need to go past 20$. But to say that a box wine will enhance what your doing in the same way a decent bottle will, is wrong.

Acidity can also be tied to the age of the wine, so you can pick something that is meant to be tabled quickly. Like the bottles I mentioned.


Did I say that a box wine would enhance in the same way a decent bottle would? Nope. But it's fine to use. Wine is but one part of a sauce's flavour, aromatics, meats seasoning, herbs, spices, are going to adding more layers than the wine. Which is why sweetness and acidity are important because those aspects can throw the sauce off balance. It's how the wine tastes that matters, not its price point. And whilst it's true that cheaper wines tend to the sweeter, it's not a universal truth. I'd say the only truth is that it's best to cook with wines that you've drunk.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


I think the "what wine should I use to cook with" guideline is better phrased in the negative – if you couldn't sit down and enjoy a couple glasses of it, don't cook with it. That's not quite the same as saying "cook with what you're serving," because obviously people who care about serving nice wines are not going to want to ruin a lot of the niceness in the cooking process. However, there are plenty of affordable wines that even serious wine enthusiasts can drink and be pleased with, even if they're not going to necessarily be memorable experiences. That is the cooking wine sweet spot.

Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

mcswizzle posted:

Does anyone know of something I can do with white wine? My wife isn't a big fan of red wine generally, with few exceptions. She's got a lot more love for white wines (she likes Rieslings generally if that helps).

Reislings are pretty good. drat. My grandpa used to drink sweet rieslings like another person would drink soda. We...didn't let him drive.

You can braise beef and maybe lamb with a white wine, even a sweet one; no big deal. The flavor's different at the end than had you done a red wine, but still. Chicken or fish are the go to with a white.

You can poach or braise pears for dessert. Really good. Add soem whipped cream with cardamom and stuff and it's even better. Reduce the leftover braising liquid and use as a syrup.

You can make a pretty dope chicken with garlic.

Try adding a little to some tomato-based sauce. It brings out very nicely some new flavors. Or an onion mushroom sauce. or even in a risotto.

And so on. You cook with red because you are looking to enhance a certain flavor set. Cook with white for the same reason. Sweet wines are interesting in tea, instead of honey or sugar.

Drifter fucked around with this message at Aug 16, 2015 around 03:23

Shbobdb
Dec 16, 2010

by Smythe


I forget what it was called, but it was basically "lamb you can cut with a spoon" in french. I don't remember all the details, but it was basically slow braising a leg of lamb in chardonnay with lemon (I used lime -- for a latin flavor) juice with a bunch of fairly basic spices (I remember oregano and rosemary). It was solid, not exceptional. Made some crazy good gyros though, mix that poo poo up with some tzatiki and it was all good.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...amb-recipe.html

It may have been that recipe or something similar. It wasn't really that great but, you know, it works. It's been something like 6 years, I remember it because my then-girlfriend was out of town for a week so I spent all week doing nothing but eating that leg of lamb. It was delicious because it was all the lamb. But just use tart cherry juice instead of wine. Boom, done.

Riesling isn't a good cooking wine, in my experience. I love a good tart Riesling, the sweet ones don't do it for me but the tart ones remind me of omphacomels I'd brew and are just wonderful. My grandfather used to drink dry rieslings every day and he was a great guy with great taste.

pr0k
Jan 16, 2001

"Well if it's gonna be
that kind of party..."

Filboid Studge posted:

It's not even that, it's basically boiled trub.

yeah that, I didn't know the proper term for yeast sludge

mcswizzle
Jul 26, 2009


Progress Report: I didn't screw it up!

I didn't realize how...hands on the cooking process would be in this recipe so the pictures I took are few and far between (specifically, just one). However, my wife was so impressed she took some after shots so I have a before/after.

I did include carrots (which ended up tasting AWESOME), and the lamb itself was cooked (according to my wife) perfectly. I appreciate all the advice, and now that I didn't screw this up I might try a few more adventurous recipes.

Before cooking, but after the marinade. It got a little messy.


The cooked meal all together. While we have a very good sized roasting pan, I realized too late that we don't have a serving platter. Oh well. My wife called her mother while we were eating to inform her that she had been out-lambed (my MIL is english, born and raised, and is very proud of her meals - lamb in particular)


My wife's anniversary gift to me (in part) was some photo's and decorations for our otherwise bare walls, as well as a photo for my desk at work (finally, people might stop asking me if my blonde haired/blue eyed nephews are my kids...further context both my wife and I are super dark haired.) She took a photo of me with the dinner I made and that gift.


Total cook time, about 2 1/2-3 hours. It was a ~3.7lb leg of lamb which fed us both and had enough for two servings of leftovers. I would do a few things differently next time, but overall I would call it a success.

edit: i spell good

mcswizzle fucked around with this message at Aug 17, 2015 around 17:29

ma i married a tuna
Apr 24, 2005

Someone paid to give you this shitty icon and give Lowtax his cyborg spine parts


Pillbug

mcswizzle posted:


Does anyone know of something I can do with white wine? My wife isn't a big fan of red wine generally, with few exceptions. She's got a lot more love for white wines (she likes Rieslings generally if that helps).

White wines,by and large are traditionally served with lighter meals - fish, chicken and such, and can be used in sauces for those dishes as well. Rieslings are odd, since they come in sweet and dry and in great and unspeakably terrible. What's also weird is that you don't need to pay a huge amount of money to get a great one. In shopping, look for Alsace (the region in France they're best made) and you'll have a good chance of getting an excellent Riesling. Actually, many whites from the Alsace tend to be good and not so expensive - try a pinot gris, sylvaner, or Chardonnay from the Alsace if you get a chance. Gewurzstraminer and Muscat for sweeter, more desert-like options.

Pairing any white wine with lamb is a little tricky. Given your wife's preferences, I would go with a younger, fruitier wine - a nice pinot noir would be excellent - and look for bright and fruit notes in descriptions. I think anyone who says they don't like red (or white) wine hasn't been exposed to the good stuff enough. There are wine apps for your smartphone that will help you make the decision in the liquor store and are very helpful. Buying wine is a minefield if you go in unprepared - but with a little scouting, $15 should be enough to get you a really decent bottle of wine regardless of what your taste preferences are.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

by R. Guyovich


mcswizzle posted:

It was a ~3.7lb leg of lamb which fed us both and had enough for two servings of leftovers.

mcswizzle
Jul 26, 2009



If it were something I'm more accustomed to eating I could've eaten a 3.7lb slab of meat on my own. We usually cook for 5-6 people, I eat my fill and then we have a day or two of leftovers for lunch. The picture of me above is a little misleading...I'm 6'5" and about 210lbs but I never stop eating :-S My metabolism will catch up to me sooner rather than later though, I'll be 30 next year.

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Drifter
Oct 22, 2000

Belated Bear Witness


Soiled Meat

What are you catstaring about? He said 4 pounds is enough for six servings. That's not unreasonable for delicious lamb.

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