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Johnny Aztec
Jan 29, 2005


No, itís plugged directly into a DSL modem.

It is a desktop system. Not a surface or a laptop.

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CaptainSarcastic
Jul 6, 2013

HAIL SATAN



Johnny Aztec posted:

No, itís plugged directly into a DSL modem.

It is a desktop system. Not a surface or a laptop.

My mistake - I misremembered.

Creating a fresh admin account might still be worth a try, if you haven't done it already.

And I can't remember offhand, but this behavior persists in Safe Mode, right?

Johnny Aztec
Jan 29, 2005


Yes, safe mode doesnít change anything.



I think this is hosed. It is taking way too long to rollback this updat...



Okay soon as I complained, but finished up. Yay for complaining?




And I donít really know, off the top of my head, how to create a new admin account.
My PC knowledge is fairly deep in some areas and very shallow in others.

I guess the idea being that a new account might not get locked behind the ďmust be onlineĒ thing. And then can possibly troubleshoot from the inside?

Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week


Johnny Aztec posted:

I guess the idea being that a new account might not get locked behind the ďmust be onlineĒ thing. And then can possibly troubleshoot from the inside?

Yes.
Instructions here.

Johnny Aztec
Jan 29, 2005


Iíll try that another day.
Ive been here since before 2 this afternoon.
I set up a batch file, to run at startup to Stop and disable the update service , since it turns itself back on.
Until I get fix it, or build them a new PC.

At least the poo poo I build stays up. Built my personal PC just as the Sandy bridge i5s came out ( i3570k)
And Iíve not have any major issue ( beyond a failing western digital drive and a GPU replacement)

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


Sorry to hear it didn't work well. Creating another account sounds like a good idea. Maybe a screenshot/picture would help us visualize what is happening better?

MCT upgrade should be just as good as a new install, but as someone up thread said, coming from Windows 7 doesn't leave the best performing Windows 10 install. Might make sense to completely flatten and reinstall if it's something that is going to be around for a while.

Johnny Aztec
Jan 29, 2005


Yes, it is unfortunate that the MCT did not help. I appreciate your knowledge, nonetheless. Thank you.

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.



After nine months or so of behaving itself, looks like another Windows Update process is waking or preventing sleep whenever it wants. Looks like it's back to disabling Windows Update and manually checking for updates for me again.

This time it's MoUsoCoreWorker.exe. Last time it was some other 'update orchestrator,' I suppose orchestras need to practice at all hours of the night.

redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

Protip: do NOT connect your PC to the internet while installing windows. Now you don't have to have an online connected account.

Chumbawumba4ever97
Dec 31, 2000



doctorfrog posted:

After nine months or so of behaving itself, looks like another Windows Update process is waking or preventing sleep whenever it wants. Looks like it's back to disabling Windows Update and manually checking for updates for me again.

This time it's MoUsoCoreWorker.exe. Last time it was some other 'update orchestrator,' I suppose orchestras need to practice at all hours of the night.

You can literally rename the update orchestrator executable. This is how I still get updates, but never get random reboots.

Ofecks
May 4, 2009

A portly feline wizard waddles forth, muttering something about conjured food.



redeyes posted:

Protip: do NOT connect your PC to the internet while installing windows. Now you don't have to have an online connected account.

Yup, I yank the ethernet cable. Even when updating my GPU drivers, because if I don't, Win10 will give me the outdated Update version upon reboot after I uninstall the previous.

For reformatting, I also need to open the case and disconnect my SATA storage drive, because it's the same size as the SSD and there's no way to tell the difference on the install screen when it asks you where to put Windows.

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.



Chumbawumba4ever97 posted:

You can literally rename the update orchestrator executable. This is how I still get updates, but never get random reboots.

I'm using Windows Update Blocker, with a scheduled task to enable/disable the services associated with update. I let Update run wild during my lunch hour, then it's shut off.

doctorfrog fucked around with this message at 17:23 on Apr 19, 2021

Jenny Agutter
Mar 18, 2009



hi dumb question here, i have two windows 10 pcs on my network both signed in with my microsoft account. how do I share a folder from one to the other? folder sharing options are enabled, and specifically enabled for my account. I can see one PC from the other via the network tab in explorer, but when i double click it it prompts for credentials and my microsoft account name/password don't work. also, putting COMPUTERNAME\microsoft@account.com + password doesn't work. i feel like i'm missing something extremely obvious but google is completely useless

e: oh you don't include the email domain in the login. okay.

Jenny Agutter fucked around with this message at 16:35 on Apr 19, 2021

Raygereio
Nov 12, 2012


redeyes posted:

Protip: do NOT connect your PC to the internet while installing windows. Now you don't have to have an online connected account.
Is this a US-only thing, or something?
I've been reading about the option for a local account being gone for while now. But every time I install a fresh Win10 the option for a local account is still there, regardless of whether the machine is hooked up to the Internet or not. Though I swear that button is getting smaller every few months.


doctorfrog posted:

I'm using Windows Update Blocker, with a scheduled task to enable/disable the services associated with update. I let Update run wild during my lunch hour, then it's shut off.
Is there any reason you're going for a third party app for that, instead of just setting the update group policy to not automatically download & install?

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


Raygereio posted:

Is there any reason you're going for a third party app for that, instead of just setting the update group policy to not automatically download & install?

The GPO doesn't work in Home editions and the registry key, along with many other methods, don't either. Not that I agree with the recommendation.

MikusR
Jan 5, 2008


Raygereio posted:

Is this a US-only thing, or something?
No, it's probably Home version or moon phase dependent.

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.



Raygereio posted:

Is there any reason you're going for a third party app for that, instead of just setting the update group policy to not automatically download & install?

Convenience. Can you schedule the update group policy editor thing to trigger on/off on a schedule?

Also, I don't recommend using the 3rd party app for anyone, it's just something that works well for me.

Raygereio
Nov 12, 2012


doctorfrog posted:

Convenience. Can you schedule the update group policy editor thing to trigger on/off on a schedule?
Also, I don't recommend using the 3rd party app for anyone, it's just something that works well for me.
The group policy has an option to set a schedule where you can specify a day & time. Never tried it myself, so I can't say how well that works.

For what it's worth, it wasn't a gotcha question or anything. If it works for you, it works. I was just curious why you did it that way. All the solutions I've tried to gain some control over the update process that involve stopping & starting the services related to update seemed to eventually break poo poo.

Im_Special
Jan 2, 2011

Look At This!!! WOW!
It's F*cking Nothing.


Group policy doesn't stop the service from constantly "checking" for updates, that's enough activity to wake the computer up.

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.



Raygereio posted:

The group policy has an option to set a schedule where you can specify a day & time. Never tried it myself, so I can't say how well that works.

For what it's worth, it wasn't a gotcha question or anything. If it works for you, it works. I was just curious why you did it that way. All the solutions I've tried to gain some control over the update process that involve stopping & starting the services related to update seemed to eventually break poo poo.

No worries. About a year ago I fought a really dumb battle against Windows Update and sleep, and the update blocker application Just Worked.

I just make it clear when I talk about apps like this that they aren't recommendations bc I don't want someone who mistakes me for an expert taking an unneeded risk.

Rinkles
Oct 24, 2010

What I'm getting at is...
Do you feel the same way?


My PC woke me up this update as well. First time in nearly a year.

buglord
Jul 31, 2010




Buglord

Is there a way to opt out of having a desktop login password when you're signed in with a Microsoft account? I'm the only person with physical access to my PC, I dont need one.

Doctor_Fruitbat
Jun 2, 2013

Oh? You're
approaching me?


Under sign-in options, you can set 'require sign-in' to never, although I think you still need to sign-in on startup, just not after waking from sleep. You can also set a PIN to get in faster.

I wouldn't go without any kind of sign-in if you're using an account, even if you're the sole user. In the unlikely event someone breaks in and steal it, you want it inaccessible long enough to log into your account online and remotely lock out the PC.

Doctor_Fruitbat fucked around with this message at 08:27 on Apr 21, 2021

PerniciousKnid
Sep 13, 2006


Jenny Agutter posted:

hi dumb question here, i have two windows 10 pcs on my network both signed in with my microsoft account. how do I share a folder from one to the other? folder sharing options are enabled, and specifically enabled for my account. I can see one PC from the other via the network tab in explorer, but when i double click it it prompts for credentials and my microsoft account name/password don't work. also, putting COMPUTERNAME\microsoft@account.com + password doesn't work. i feel like i'm missing something extremely obvious but google is completely useless

e: oh you don't include the email domain in the login. okay.

Did you actually get this to work? I haven't been able to do local networking since they started pushing OneDrive. Is it required that you have a Microsoft (instead of local) account?

DerekSmartymans
Feb 14, 2005

The
Copacetic
Ascetic


Klyith posted:

Rather than thinking of capacitors as power storage like batteries, I think a good analogy is that they're tiny water towers for electorns. You push electrons "up" into a capacitor through one leg, then later they come "down" and out the same pipe. The other leg of the capacitor is supplying positive charge that keeps the electrons in the water tank. So in your PC VRM, the capacitor is smoothing voltage: when there are too many electrons they go up into the water tank, then flow back out when the voltage drops.

This is exactly how my college Physics 101 TA described it. Matter of fact, everything in electronics/electricity was explained this way and it really does help keep it in your head.

I also found out he was an Oxford, MS volunteer firefighter, and he could talk for hours about turbulence and cavitation in pump trucks. I canít even remember is name: I just thought Iíd read about him collecting the millennium prize for Navier-Stokes or something.

Factor Mystic
Mar 19, 2006

Baby's First Post-Apocalyptic Fiction

Looks like they're working on fixing the thing where apps move when displayport devices disconnect, specifically during sleep: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/directx/avoid-unexpected-app-rearrangement/

Fame Douglas
Nov 20, 2013

RELY NOT ON MY HONOR!!! FOR WHEN I OFFER MY WORD OF BOND, I TAKE NOT THAT VOW TO HEART!! CASUALLY, I BRING SHAME TO MY HOUSEHOLD AND RUIN TO THOSE WHO RELY ON MY COMMITMENT, BY SHIRKING MY AVOWED DUTY

nvm

Fame Douglas fucked around with this message at 19:56 on Apr 28, 2021

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Factor Mystic posted:

Looks like they're working on fixing the thing where apps move when displayport devices disconnect, specifically during sleep: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/directx/avoid-unexpected-app-rearrangement/

This only seems to fix/workaround a specific situation: A display losing the hot-plug detect signal for a very short time (from the OS point of view) before returning again. The specific situation the blog post describes is when you put your computer to sleep, and it causes the external display to go to sleep as well, and the external display turns off the hot-plug detect when it sleeps, and the external display takes a while to wake up after the PC wakes back up from sleep. Then there is a short period of time where the pc is running and wanting to use the display, without the display having HPD enabled, and in that situation Windows usually re-organizes all the windows.
What this workaround then does is add a delay before the lost HPD is acted upon. I.e. if your display drops HPD for a short period and then returns, this workaround applies.

I don't think it will apply to the situations where the PC remains running but puts the display to sleep, and the display drops HPD while sleeping. Then it will not be a "rapid HPD" event, but a regular "slow HPD" event. I also don't think it will apply to the situation where you switch the display to a different input source, and it turns off HPD from the source you switched away from, that's also a "slow HPD" event.

Fame Douglas
Nov 20, 2013

RELY NOT ON MY HONOR!!! FOR WHEN I OFFER MY WORD OF BOND, I TAKE NOT THAT VOW TO HEART!! CASUALLY, I BRING SHAME TO MY HOUSEHOLD AND RUIN TO THOSE WHO RELY ON MY COMMITMENT, BY SHIRKING MY AVOWED DUTY

nielsm posted:

This only seems to fix/workaround a specific situation: A display losing the hot-plug detect signal for a very short time (from the OS point of view) before returning again. The specific situation the blog post describes is when you put your computer to sleep, and it causes the external display to go to sleep as well, and the external display turns off the hot-plug detect when it sleeps, and the external display takes a while to wake up after the PC wakes back up from sleep. Then there is a short period of time where the pc is running and wanting to use the display, without the display having HPD enabled, and in that situation Windows usually re-organizes all the windows.
What this workaround then does is add a delay before the lost HPD is acted upon. I.e. if your display drops HPD for a short period and then returns, this workaround applies.

I don't think it will apply to the situations where the PC remains running but puts the display to sleep, and the display drops HPD while sleeping. Then it will not be a "rapid HPD" event, but a regular "slow HPD" event. I also don't think it will apply to the situation where you switch the display to a different input source, and it turns off HPD from the source you switched away from, that's also a "slow HPD" event.

It seems to solve exactly the problem people in this thread have been complaining about for a long time. How it works with displays switching to different input modes is another question, I assume it won't keep the windows on the second screen then. I don't think anyone was asking for that behavior, either.

I don't have Insider, and I don't experience the problem with my current hardware. We'll know more soon enough.

Their description:
Your device (laptop or desktop) is connected to external monitors over a DisplayPort connector. Application windows are placed in certain locations on your screen.
You leave your system for some time and your device goes to sleep.
You come back and return to your system to wake your device.
The application windows have unexpectedly moved to a different location of the monitor (sometimes clustered on one screen).

Fame Douglas fucked around with this message at 20:06 on Apr 28, 2021

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Fame Douglas posted:

Their description:
Your device (laptop or desktop) is connected to external monitors over a DisplayPort connector. Application windows are placed in certain locations on your screen.
You leave your system for some time and your device goes to sleep.
You come back and return to your system to wake your device.
The application windows have unexpectedly moved to a different location of the monitor (sometimes clustered on one screen).

I have highlighted the central thing I base my theory on. The fact that your device (i.e. computer) goes to sleep means that time stops passing for the OS while the device is sleeping, and it will not monitor the hot-plug detect signal while the device is asleep. When the device wakes up, the HPD signal is lost for a short period of time while the computer is awake but the display is not fully awake.

Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week


nielsm posted:

I have highlighted the central thing I base my theory on. The fact that your device (i.e. computer) goes to sleep means that time stops passing for the OS while the device is sleeping, and it will not monitor the hot-plug detect signal while the device is asleep. When the device wakes up, the HPD signal is lost for a short period of time while the computer is awake but the display is not fully awake.

And it starts with "Imagine the following scenario". Implying that it's an occasion you might see the behavior.

Like, we'll see when it reaches wide distribution, but they'd be idiots to only fix it during resume from PC sleep when they've seen zillions of complaints about it happening during monitor power save.

sarr
Mar 24, 2008

Praise the Sun!


I need some help goons.

I have a relatively fresh Win 10 install on my PC (20H2 Build 19042.928). I also have a NAS on a LAN that I use mainly for Plex. Every night around 2AM Windows Defender goes nuts using absurd amounts of network capacity. I thought maybe it just wanted to scan all the files once but it never ends. Anyone know how I can stop this? I have tried setting up exceptions for the NAS under real-time protection but it did nothing. I also tried changing active hours but it didn't help.

wargames
Mar 16, 2008

official yospos cat censor


sarr posted:

I need some help goons.

I have a relatively fresh Win 10 install on my PC (20H2 Build 19042.928). I also have a NAS on a LAN that I use mainly for Plex. Every night around 2AM Windows Defender goes nuts using absurd amounts of network capacity. I thought maybe it just wanted to scan all the files once but it never ends. Anyone know how I can stop this? I have tried setting up exceptions for the NAS under real-time protection but it did nothing. I also tried changing active hours but it didn't help.



I haven't seen it blast network like that but at work, i have seen it blast CPU usage. run a full scan and see if it settles down.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

sarr posted:

I need some help goons.

I have a relatively fresh Win 10 install on my PC (20H2 Build 19042.928). I also have a NAS on a LAN that I use mainly for Plex. Every night around 2AM Windows Defender goes nuts using absurd amounts of network capacity. I thought maybe it just wanted to scan all the files once but it never ends. Anyone know how I can stop this? I have tried setting up exceptions for the NAS under real-time protection but it did nothing. I also tried changing active hours but it didn't help.



Check the Performance tab to see if it's actually sending traffic out on your physical network interface. Maybe it's just using a localhost or virtual interface to do something.

sarr
Mar 24, 2008

Praise the Sun!


wargames posted:

I haven't seen it blast network like that but at work, i have seen it blast CPU usage. run a full scan and see if it settles down.

I tried running a custom scan a few times, but it only took like 30 minutes since all the files are big in size. This other issue can persist for hours it seems..

nielsm posted:

Check the Performance tab to see if it's actually sending traffic out on your physical network interface. Maybe it's just using a localhost or virtual interface to do something.

It's actual traffic, I first noticed the issue because video playback from the NAS was buffering / stuttering a lot. Since it's a gigabit connection I thought it was weird and I started checking the performance tab and I noticed windows hogging all the bandwidth. Bizarre.

SwissArmyDruid
Feb 14, 2014



Hm. Uneducated guess, but antivirus might be scanning your networked device while you're trying to stream off it?

I believe there is an option to explicitly exclude network locations.

Mr Shiny Pants
Nov 12, 2012


SwissArmyDruid posted:

Hm. Uneducated guess, but antivirus might be scanning your networked device while you're trying to stream off it?

I believe there is an option to explicitly exclude network locations.

Probably, Defender seems to be a lot more aggressive for some time now. So aggressive that I actually begin to notice it running whereas before it would just do its thing without me noticing.

barnold
Dec 16, 2011

...but i didnt finish




potentially silly question: can the native Win10 Sticky Notes app pin a note to the desktop widget-style without being persistent in the taskbar? I frequently have to copy and paste the same thing and the sticky note widget of Vista/7 yore used to work great as it wouldn't show up in the taskbar, which is cool for single-monitor gangers like me who have several windows open at any given time

I guess I could just install 8GadgetPack but I figured I'd ask since I just clicked around in the app's settings but couldn't find a setting for it. I'm going to take that as a sign that it probably won't do what I want it to do

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



There's a whole subgenre of software called clipboard managers for people with recurring copy/paste jobs. Windows 10 also has a basic clipboard history feature accessed through Win+V.

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Saukkis
May 16, 2003

Unless I'm on the inside curve pointing straight at oncoming traffic the high beams stay on and I laugh at your puny protest flashes.
I am Most Important Man. Most Important Man in the World.

Yes, it's worth going with a dedicated application. Nowadays I use Ditto. It's amazing how big of an usability improvement a 5k item clipboard history is.

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