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nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Windows 10 is here!
The latest and greatest of Microsoft's operating systems, now for computers of all form factors.

And yes, there is a free upgrade for everyone running Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 right now. You just need to grab it before July 29th 2016.
Yes, no more free upgrades after July 29th!


Should I upgrade right now?
Windows 10 seems to be over the biggest obstacles, and there aren't many reasons left to stick to older versions.
On the other hand, if your current system works well enough and is mission critical in some way, don't upgrade.

What happens after July 29th 2016? Do I have to pay to keep using it?
No. The free upgrade offer is "grab it now and it's yours forever".

I'm running Windows XP/Windows Vista. Can I upgrade?
No. You'll have to buy Windows 10, or a Windows 7 or 8 version to upgrade from.
You might be able to find 7 and 8 on sale, just beware of super cheap keys, they might not be entirely kosher.

What edition of Windows 10 will I get?
Windows 10 comes in four editions, but only two are relevant to the free upgrade: Home and Pro.
If you have a Professional or Ultimate edition of Windows 7 or 8, you get the Pro edition of Windows 10. Otherwise you get the Home edition.
If you're using an Enterprise version, there is no free upgrade for you.

Windows says my upgrade is reserved, but it isn't my turn yet. I want it now!
You can do that.
Use the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool to install right away, make a bootable USB thumb drive to install from, or even get a full DVD ISO.
I have reserved, but I don't want to upgrade right now.
Accepting the reservation means you will be upgraded automatically!
If you don't want to upgrade right now, cancel the reservation.
(Shouldn't be relevant any longer, now the initial upgrade rush period is over.)

I did the upgrade. Where's my product key?
There is none.
You don't get a product key from the free upgrade.
Repeating this: You do not get a product key from the free upgrade.
When you do the upgrade, the installer sends a "fingerprint" of your computer (motherboard+CPU, mainly) to Microsoft, and that marks your computer as eligible for free Windows 10.
However, see next question too.

I don't want to upgrade. I want to do a clean install!
Cool, you can do that now. You just need your original Windows 7 or 8 product key.
Use the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool to make a bootable USB drive or DVD. Then start the installation as usual.
When the Windows 10 installer asks for your product key, enter your Windows 7 or 8 key. It will recognize the key as valid and begin installing the appropriate edition.

I already upgraded, but then I had to replace my harddrive. How do I do a clean install now?
If you've already had the Windows 10 upgrade done on your system, just press Skip when the setup asks you for a key. When the install is done, it will then activate through the hardware fingerprint that got registered during your original upgrade.
If you haven't ever installed Windows 10, enter your Windows 7 or 8 product key when the installer asks for one.

Wait, if I upgrade now, then replace my motherboard in 2 months, will my license be invalid?
Probably yes. You might still be able to reinstall using a Windows 7 or 8 key, but officially your motherboard is the computer, and the license is bound to the computer. So new motherboard means you must purchase a new license.
2016-06-22: This may be changing! With the Anniversary Update it looks like you will be able to link your Digital Entitlement license to a Microsoft account, and keep it valid across larger hardware upgrades.

Something happened!
Yes, that's an actual error message some have had while trying to do the upgrade. No-one's reported it for a while, so it's probably solved, but if you get it, the fix seems to involve changing your regional/language settings.

More upgrade/install troubleshooting tips below.




What's new in Windows 10

The Start screen from Windows 8 has been melded into the olden Start menu, to create a new Start menu with tiles on the right half.


The Action Center control panel from Vista and charms bar from 8 have been replaced with a Notification Center that holds notifications from all sorts of apps, as well as lots of buttons and toggles for various things.


One of those toggles is tablet mode. This basically disables access to the Desktop, and makes all apps run in full screen. It does make touch-only usage easier. You can switch it on and off quickly, useful if you have a convertible.

Cortana is Microsoft's personal assistant. Cortana can search for things, create calendar appointments, and send all kinds of commands to apps. The apps just have to be made for it. However... it's only available for some combinations of language and regional settings.

The app store has been enhanced, and can now offer regular old desktop software as well. Microsoft figured out a way to package regular Win32 software so it can be installed and uninstalled safely, and run in an isolated manner without affecting the entire system.

Internet Explorer is being replaced with Edge, a new browser. Despite the "e" icon, it has little to do with the old IE, and is generally much more sensible. Definitely give it a chance.
(You can still also use IE 11 if you need to.)

Rolling upgrades Microsoft is promising to continually update Windows 10 with new features and general improvements over time.

Virtual desktops, almost like multi-monitor but without the need for more hardware.



Editions

There are four edition of Windows 10:

Home: Does most things, but is missing several power user features. Is sold retail and comes pre-loaded.

Pro: Can join domains, act as Hyper-V host, and load of other fancy things. Is sold retail and comes pre-loaded.

Enterprise: Mostly the same as Pro, but with some more management features. Only sold through volume licensing agreements.

Education: Mostly the same as Enterprise, but targeted at students. Sold through volume licensing agreements to educational institutions.

Microsoft has a comparison here


...how about Windows RT?
It's gone. Microsoft does have a Mobile edition of Windows 10, that OEMs can design phones and small tablets for. Windows 10 Mobile is the closest to a successor to Windows RT there will be, but is perhaps more of a successor to Windows Phone.

As a consolation prize for buying a Windows RT tablet, you get a small update with a Start Menu. (Article on Softpedia)


Privacy woes?

You might have read various pieces attacking Windows 10 for ruining your privacy and control of your computer in various ways. How much of that is true?

Forced updates: Yes, the Home edition will download and install updates without asking, and you can't turn that off. This can be an actual problem when a broken update goes out once in a while.
However, this is generally a good thing, because it will most likely cut down on support calls from grandma getting hits by exploits due to not getting fixes in time.
Although there is a tool to disable specific updates, but you still have to run it before the update in question begins installing.
If you want to control your updates, you are a power user and should consider running the Pro edition.

Peer-to-peer updates: Yes, by default updates will get downloaded not just from Microsoft's servers, but also from other users and systems on the Internet and local network. You can choose to only let P2P act over the local network. However, this is not a security risk. You cannot get viruses/malware pushed through updates like this. All packages are cryptographically verified before they get installed.
Getting updates from other machines on the local network can definitely help save bandwidth, great if you have several computers at home, and a metered connection. FAQ

Wi-Fi Sense/Network key sharing: This is a feature that lets you share wireless network keys with contacts/friends on Outlook.com, Skype, and/or Facebook. The claim is that this happens entirely automatically and your network key will eventually be spread to everyone across the world.
The truth is, you have to actively choose which services you want to share network keys on, and you have to actively select a network and click a "Share" button for it to happen. If someone then connects to the network you shared, they won't be able to share it further.
If you don't want your network key shared, just tell your friends to not click Share. FAQ

Predictive loading/search suggestions in Edge: Like every other browser (particularly Chrome), Edge has some features to pre-cache pages before you visit them, show suggested search terms, and more. Some of the settings' descriptions could be misunderstood out of context. You can turn off the predictive features if you don't like it. FAQ

Forced anti-malware: Yes, Windows 10 forces Windows Defender to be enabled if you aren't running any other antivirus software. If you don't like Windows Defender, install some other AV on your system.

Telemetry: Collecting some basic usage statistics, like how often you launch applications from desktop shortcuts versus task bar pinned icons versus Start menu search, has been common for a good while. If you really don't like it, the Basic settings will basically only report what sort of hardware you use (already done by activation) and send basic crash reports.
None of this is used for generating advertising or otherwise identifying anyone, but only for statistics to direct bug fixing and feature improvement to the most important areas. FAQ



This post is delivered as-is. No warranties implicit or explicit are given to the correctness, applicability, merchantability or other desirable features of the Content. The Content may not be kept updated in a timely manner. All reading is performed at one's own risk.

nielsm fucked around with this message at 18:32 on Jun 22, 2016

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nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

More FAQ stuff

My Start menu is broken, help!

GreenNight posted:

Microsoft released a tool to troubleshoot the Start Menu in Windows 10.

http://betanews.com/2016/06/21/fix-...-10-start-menu/
See also Microsoft's page on Start menu troubleshooting, that includes the a more official link to the above tool.


White title bars are ugly, or, I like my taskbar vertical

Lum posted:

If you're like me and prefer a vertical taskbar, but want it really narrow, 7+ Taskbar Tweaker is now out of alpha and can be downloaded without being forced to donate.

Also the latest WinAero Tweaker lets you enable the Aero Lite theme which has coloured titlebars without the bugginess of the other method.

Windows 7 has the best Start menu ever!

quote:

Classic Shell may be for you.

After a full format/reinstall I'm getting a Home edition rather than Pro. Can I get Pro back?

wolrah posted:

Just did a fresh reinstall on my laptop. I know the OS restore feature should be basically the same, but my install on this machine dated back to the initial public preview and was MBR/BIOS mode rather than GPT/UEFI which I wanted to change so I could enable Secure Boot.

This laptop shipped with Windows 8 Home and thus has a Windows 8 Home key in the BIOS. Since I was doing a clean install the Windows 10 installer saw this and automatically installed 10 Home as an upgrade on that key. The thing is, I was using 10 Pro which I was apparently given at some point during the preview period because I was not running in Insider mode after release but it stayed as Pro. I figured it was from being an early tester or submitting bugs or something.

Since I never received anything officially saying I was being given 10 Pro I wasn't entirely disappointed that my machine was installing as Home, and I have a few legit 7 Pro keys around so I was just going to use one of those. I tried just putting the 7 Pro key in to the "Change Key" dialog but it was rejected because it wasn't the right version. I found a bunch of stuff on the internet saying to use the default key, VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T, and that would convert it to an un-activated Pro install which I could then put my 7 Pro key in to.

I set the default key, rebooted, and to my surprise it showed me as 10 Pro, activated by digital entitlement.

nielsm fucked around with this message at 08:09 on Jul 3, 2016

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

You could upgrade your existing install to Win 10, then do a fresh install on the SSD. But if you're currently using a mechanical drive it might be faster to install a new Windows on that, or perhaps image your old install over to the SSD, then upgrade on that.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Shumagorath posted:

Just to be clear: The upgrade will never kick off without my explicit action, right? I have an old Core 2 that's been approved for the update but its motherboard is even further out of support than my Sandy Bridge (which got through fine) and I'm almost sure the Core 2 doesn't have Windows 8 drivers for a lot of things.

If you have said yes to reserve, then it will upgrade automatically!

If you have "reserved" and don't want to upgrade just yet, go and cancel the reservation.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

I haven't had problems with display sleeping on Windows 10. I also don't use Chrome.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Irritated Goat posted:

What? You mean my tiny Surface 2 RT might not blow super amounts of rear end when it comes to functionality soon?

Yeah sorry. What I mean is, OEMs making new, small form-factor tablets (8 inches and below) will be able to put the Mobile edition on. Really, Win 10 Mobile is more or less Win 10 RT, except MS won't license it for "real computers", and it will be the exact same OS running on phones and small tablets.
I don't know if an 8" tablet with Atom CPU could still get a real Win 10 Home.

But no upgrades for Windows RT tablets.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

awesmoe posted:

Given that I am happy with windows 7 on a desktop pc primarily used for gaming, should I upgrade and if so why?

For gaming, DirectX 12 would be the main draw. But there probably isn't much reason for you to upgrade right now, especially not seeing some people still have trouble with graphics drivers.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Not activating Windows will usually put it into a limited functionality mode. I think along the lines of the "Starter" edition of XP: Limited screen resolution, no desktop wallpaper, limitation on number of running programs. It shouldn't completely lock you out.

If you still have the disc and key for your previous Windows version, you can try doing a fresh install, then let that activate, and do the upgrade again.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Cojawfee posted:

What edition of 7 is it? Pro can switch between 32 and 64, I don't think Home can.

Nah, no version of Windows has ever let you switch (cross-grade?) an installation from one CPU architecture to another, in particular not x86 32 bit to x86 64 bit either. It also isn't possible to upgrade a 32 bit version of any system into a 64 bit version of some system.

However, since Vista, a license for 32 bit is also good for 64 bit, and vice versa: You can take your laptop with OEM 32 bit Windows 7, format it, and install the equivalent 64 bit edition of Windows 7 on it, using the license key on the sticker. For Windows 8 and 10 OEM it should be able to install using the key stored in firmware.

Presumably that also means that once your system has been registered for free Windows 10, you can format and install a different bitness version of the correct edition on it, and get it to activate.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

RightClickSaveAs posted:

In the Windows 10 update screen, right click on these two updates (KB3021917 and KB3035583) and click "Hide"


e: actually you'll have to uninstall those two updates first, as you probably already have them installed. Go to "View Update History" then click on the "To remove and update, view Installed Updates" link on the top of the screen, which will get you to ANOTHER screen where you can select updates to uninstall. Uninstall the two listed in the screenshot above.

May need to go under "Optional Updates" and hide the "Upgrade to Windows 10" update as well. Now you can go on your merry Windows 7 way, and it should give you just the regular security updates.

Added this to the second post. Suggestions for other stuff to go there welcome.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Repo Man posted:

I installed Irfanview (I haven't needed that in years, takes me back to installing ACDSee on Win98 and 2000) but you can only scroll through a couple of photos before this happens:



This is from viewing the thumbnails on the camera's memory card, double clicking on one to open it with Irfanview, then clicking the arrow in either direction to view the other images on the memory card.

If I try to open the camera's folder with Irfanview, it doesn't exist.



Your camera appears to the computer as an "imaging device" (that has storage) rather than a "mass storage device". The "imaging device" protocol on USB can let the hardware present a filesystem-like interface to already recorded images, but it doesn't work as an actual file system. That is, the camera is telling the computer "these are the pictures I have taken".

The "mass storage device" protocol (device class) on the other hand, is general file storage. Some cameras, especially higher end ones, have a setting in its menu to control how it presents itself to the computer. If your camera allows you to switch mode like that, try it. That will essentially make it act like a very expensive and power-hungry memory card reader.

Programs have to be written specially to be able to handle the USB "imaging device" protocol at all. It seems to be a new thing that Windows 10 tries to work around this by copying the pictures over to a temporary folder on the harddrive, then opening the copy in a program.
IrfanView doesn't handle the "imagine device" protocol, that's why your camera doesn't show up there. It only handles normal drives/mass storage devices.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

It definitely doesn't make sense to display compressed pages as straight occupied, as long as they could potentially be offloaded to a page file. The same way memory used for disk cache counts as "available", though not "free".

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Storm- posted:

In a few days I will be upgrading my mobo and CPU. What is the least painful way of reinstalling Windows 10 on my, by Microsoft standards, new PC? Reinstall Windows 8, reactivate through support and upgrade to 10 again? Or just buy OEM Win 10 and throw money at it since chances are you'll have to do it eventually?

Are you running with old-style PC BIOS boot right now, and the new mobo would be UEFI boot? If that's the same, definitely reinstall. Going Win 8 install -> ensure activated -> Win 10 upgrade should work fine for that.

If you're already using UEFI boot, first try just booting back into your existing install, see if that's possible.
If not, try if you can do a boot recovery. You might need a bootable Win 10 DVD or USB for that.
If you manage to boot into your existing install, see if it will activate. If it does, awesome. Report back! If not, see if you can phone Microsoft and get them to activate, also report that back I think lots of people want to know how that kind of hardware upgrade gets handled.

If you can't get your existing upgraded install activated again, just do the Win 8 install -> ensure activated -> Win 10 upgrade dance. That ought to work.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Storm- posted:

I do dislike how the Media Tool forces me to install it in my native language instead of EN-US even after changing my locale/location during the upgrade. Been using Windows in English for so long even native OS language is pretty much moonspeak.

If you have it make an ISO you can choose language. If you're on Windows 8 or up you can then mount the ISO directly and just start the installer from that. If not, use WinRAR or something to unpack it and start the installer.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Anti Plum posted:

I've briefly scanned the op and the last few pages but I didn't see anything.

I replaced my mainboard/cpu/ram and now windows 10 won't activate (no surprise there), but the support people say the only option is to reinstall windows 8.1 and redo the free upgrade.
Is there no other way? That's a massive pain in the rear end... What happened to phone activation?

EDIT:


The lovely thing is I went from an old rear end AMD (not UEFI) to new Intel (UEFI) and windows didn't even blink with regards to drivers and poo poo. Downloaded the latest drivers from the manufacturer and everything works perfectly. Except that windows won't activate and support says either buy a new key or reinstall.

I guess that makes it official: The free Windows 10 upgrade expires when you do a major hardware replacement. No reactivations.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

berzerkmonkey posted:

That's what I'm doing, and I'm being asked for a license key.

Are you running setup.exe from inside the existing Windows install?

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

There we have it, Windows RT gets a Start Menu, and that's it.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

On the other hand, how useful is a Start menu actually on Windows RT? The only desktop software you really have is File Explorer and Office, and then a couple of administrative things.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Lowtechs posted:

They have tabs in build 10547.

I think GreenNight is referring to "tabs" as in multiple browsers in a single window, switched with tabs. Same way you have tabs in your web browser. Not the tabs on the toolbar.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

ilkhan posted:

Is there a way to limit the max size of a folder in win10? I'm thinking of limiting a downloads folder to 50GB or something, so it doesn't max out my SB's 256GB when I forget to watch TV shows update my linux ISOs for a while.

You could enable quota management on your harddrive (Properties for the drive in File Explorer) which lets you set disk-space usage limits per user.
However you can't set it on folders, only on disk volumes, instead you can only limit it per user. So you'd have to run your downloads in a separate user account.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Lum posted:

Is there any way to teach Cortana commands that do something specific, e.g. if I say "Hey Cortana, turn the bedroom light off" it would make a JSON call to http://192.168.1.2:8084/json.htm?ty...9&switchcmd=Off (also need to figure out how to make Android do the same thing)

Yes but you need an app to provide the commands and logic.
For simple things like that it should be easy to just throw something together in Visual Studio Express, at least if the demos I've viewed from Build conferences are to be trusted.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Phobophilia posted:

So basically **~~trusted windows store App~~** get installed through a mystery installer and not through the usual installers.

Well, I guess it's safer than otherwise.

Installed by the system, pretty much.
Windows App Model packages (as I think they're supposed to be called) are supposed to be perfectly isolated, so software installed through one can't break things that aren't its own, and when you uninstall it, it's truly gone.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Josh Lyman posted:

Not more dll's?

They still exist, but you're supposed to bring your own copy of any that aren't supplied by the system. And definitely don't place your things in system locations.
(You were never supposed to place your own DLLs in system locations.)

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Abel Wingnut posted:

i upgraded my main machine to windows 10 a couple of months ago. i want to create two VM on this same machine. i would like to install windows 10 in each VM. is it possible to use my existing license to download two more copies of windows 10 for those VM?

Might be "possible", but it's certainly against the license conditions. One Windows client license allows you to install one copy on one physical or virtual machine.

If you want to run multiple Win 10 VMs you can:
1) Run trial versions, need to reinstall every so often
2) Buy a retail license for each VM
3) Get licenses through an MS TechNet subscription

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Mr. Fortitude posted:

Wasn't sure if this should go here or in the SSD thread, but I just ordered a new SSD that's due to arrive tomorrow and I wanted to ask if I'd be correct in thinking that I should disconnect my current HDD leaving only the SSD connected, do a fresh installation of Windows 10 on the SSD and then reconnect the HDD to transfer any files I want to keep to the SSD?

I know there's migration tool software but I'd prefer to have a completely clean installation of Windows 10 if at all possible, without losing any of my documents and the like.

Have you done the in-place upgrade dance yet? If you use Win 7, 8 or 8.1 currently and want to use the free upgrade, you currently need to do an in-place upgrade to get your machine marked as eligible for Windows 10.
If you have already done that, or you have a retail Win 10, go ahead with your suggestion, it sounds like the right thing.

If you'd prefer to not do an in-place upgrade at all you can otherwise try getting the ISO for a recent Insider Build version, can't remember the exact build number. But it will accept a Win 7, 8 or 8.1 retail key and get a Win 10 license from that. Just keep in mind that it's then a beta build you're running and there's some extra telemetry forced on.
That feature should appear in a proper update some time soon, though.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

If anyone with experiences can write a blurb about the new use-your-old-key system for clean installs I can put that in the OP. And any other updates you think may be relevant.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

ThermoPhysical posted:

http://www.zdnet.com/article/micros...ownload-server/

The new Windows 10 Media Creation Tool now only installs Build 10240 and MS wants everyone to upgrade to Build 1511 instead of clean installing.

(EDIT: There's a copy of the old 1511 MCT here http://download.microsoft.com/downl...reationTool.exe Grab it before MS removes it.)

Ugh I just downloaded an ISO with the MCT a few hours ago, for use when my new hardware arrives some time next week. Is there any way to check if I got an RTM or 1511 package?

Edit: install.wim and boot.wim on the image are both dated 2015-11-22, at least they're recent?

nielsm fucked around with this message at 17:25 on Nov 22, 2015

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

BrainDance posted:

I'm also getting a few bluescreens on build 10586, they're "driver not less or equal" (or something) errors with netio.sys. Any ideas what would be causing that?

IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL errors usually means a buggy driver, or broken hardware that causes a driver to break.

netio.sys is a system component, make sure you're getting the error reports sent off to MS. But it likely also means there is a problem with your network interface, wired or wireless.


As for the "saving icon positions": No it isn't really that simple.

And applications will typically start on the display the mouse cursor is at when the application creates its first window.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Lum posted:

Any way to make it not flash the power light when hibernating, short of unplugging the cable?

Asus p6t deluxe if it matters. Computer is 2 rooms away from the bedroom but still flashes bright enough to keep me awake.

Pure hibernate and not hybrid sleep?

I think it'd be a firmware setting if anything.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

BrainDance posted:

Also, I got all my desktop icons arranged but windows likes to be a bitch when a game switches my resolution or just randomly. Anyone know of any free solutions to "saving" my desktop layout that use very little cpu (I've got this thing about keeping my cpu as available as possible)?

Two pages back, but I just randomly stumbled on this, which seems to do exactly that:
http://www.midiox.com/desktoprestore.htm

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Flipperwaldt posted:

You can just change the display language in pc settings and/or the control panel, in both 8 or 10. Don't know if this has been possible since Vista or if in Windows 7 this maybe was only accessible in non-Home versions or something, but it isn't an issue now. You can switch display languages on the fly, more or less. It shouldn't require more than logging out and then in again, at any point.

Or you can download English language windows 10 install media and plug in your windows 8.1 key during a clean install instead of upgrading, if you don't trust the language pack to do its job, but it's overkill. Just saying your key isn't tied to a particular language at all, like it was on XP.

Vista made product keys agnostic towards language and architecture, but MUI language packs were only available for Ultimate and Enterprise editions. 8 made language packs available for all editions.
That said, MUI packs are annoying and you're best off making install media in the language you want and install fresh.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Speaking of lock screen issues, my small tablet that was upgraded from 8.1 to 10, sometimes when I push the hardware Start button to bring it back from sleep, I just get a black screen. Backlight is clearly on, but nothing gets displayed. Windows also shows the little "touch trails" if I try to use the touchscreen.
But if I then pull out a Bluetooth keyboard, already paired to the tablet, and press Ctrl-Alt-Del, I get the unlock screen.
Happens a few times a week.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

SinineSiil posted:

Does Win 10 also have issue with not waking up from sleep by mouse/keyboard input? Or is it my new laptop's fault instead?

I had some of that previously on my tablet, but haven't had that happen since the 1511 update. Now I "only" get the breakage with it waking up but never displaying the unlock screen, requiring me to Ctrl-Alt-Del, to get away from a black screen.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Dr. Gitmo Moneyson posted:

This got lost on the last page. If there's a better thread for it, please let me know.

This thread is pretty much only about Windows 10 the operating system, and not the software running on it.

But uh I'm not sure I even understand the question. What do you mean by "cache" in here? Do you mean a server message store like Exchange, IMAP or otherwise, where you or the provider removes messages from on a schedule?
You could set up a rule to copy messages to a local PST data file?

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Dr. Gitmo Moneyson posted:

I want the mail to stay on my computer after being deleted from the place it comes from. Like for example, a gmail or Yahoo account.


EDIT: I moved the question to the Software thread.

Yep then you just need an inbox rule that copies new messages to a local PST file.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Sir Unimaginative posted:

Chocolatey uses defaults. Steam by default installs to Program Files.

If you install Steam in Program Files, that's the only place (absent Steam Mover bullshit) you can install games on your system drive (which is presumably your only SSD, which matters for some games now), and being in Program Files is a good way to break games because games do dumb poo poo like take their mods or even save to their operating directory and this doesn't play well with the program file protection imposed on Program Files.

Don't install Steam in Program Files.

Nonsense, Steam has natively supported installing games to different locations for a long time now.



You just have to set up one or more additional Steam Library Folders on the Downloads page in Settings.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Sir Unimaginative posted:

Okay, go try setting up a library on the same drive Steam's installed on.

No really, that makes no sense.

Also never had any issues with Steam being in Program Files. Though probably because of these permissions set up by Steam's installer. Yes arguably a bad idea, but really no more or less secure than having it anywhere else.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

Sir Unimaginative posted:



I'm legitimately surprised Microsoft hasn't talked to Valve about this.

The "correct" solution would probably be to only have a service running as an account with limited write access to just that folder do all the installation stuff, and then for games that depend on files in the install being writable, have some folder redirection magic, or worst case single-file special permissions, set up. And you might have to write manifests for each game, declaring what it needs.
Good luck getting that to actually work reliably.

If you install Steam somewhere else, you still end up having a user-writable folder full of executables. It just isn't below Program Files.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

I originally did the reservation for my main home desktop, before the release. Then I figured I should probably do a long overdue hardware upgrade first, and un-reserved. I'm still on Win 7, have the GWX icon in the notify area, but haven't been bugged about it actively even once, and it's not being offered through Windows Update either.

Apparently that counts as a "nope don't upgrade me"?

I'm going to be getting another, bigger SSD soon, and install 10 on that for a fresh beginning instead.

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nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

ilkhan posted:

There are several people here who would love to know where that switch is.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3080351

quote:

Windows registry
Important Follow the steps in this section carefully. Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Before you modify it, back up the registry for restoration in case problems occur.

To block the upgrade to Windows 10 through Windows Update, specify the following registry value:

Subkey: HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate
DWORD value: DisableOSUpgrade = 1

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