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Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Crotch Fruit posted:

Just once I want to find a program or app in Windows 10 where the "help" icon does not simply launch the browser to a Bing search result for "How do I get help in Windows 10". Completely loving useless.

Oh, I can help with that!

If you click the help link next to the 'defer upgrades' button, you get a Bing search for "Defer upgrades in Windows 10" instead.

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Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


D. Ebdrup posted:

I spent a bit of last night going through this in Wireshark and while it does indeed seem like 1 packet of some 1kb-range is sent each time, it's sent via https with tls1.2 and is therefore not whatever this image appears to show
Because the person that took the image set up a local certificate and MitM.

quote:

(I'm not sure what it's supposed to show, because it certainly doesn't send your search query - nor does it actually send data, it's merely grabbing some data; I suspect to keep the weather pane and other panes up-to-date),
I don't want my OS sending back a notification every single time I touch the start menu. Anything more than occasional and purely statistical use information is too creepy for me.

quote:

nor does it send the traffic to bing.com but rather to a non-specific address in 204.79.196.0/23 from my testing of several machines.
PING bing.com (204.79.197.200) 56(84) bytes of data.

If it's in the bing.com range, using a bing.com host header, that sounds like bing.com to me.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


socialsecurity posted:

Don't assume grand conspiracy, where simple incompetence makes more sense.

Microsoft loves to artificially segment on weird simple features. That's not a grand conspiracy.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Jan posted:

Well, I don't see what else could be causing programs to suddenly experience a drastic decrease in working set memory while System's skyrockets. I don't think it's new to an insider preview and they only chose to mention it just now, possibly accompanying some actual improvements to that functionality in said insider preview.

Decompressing in-memory is really fast, and the compression should only kick in when you're somewhat low on ram. I'd be surprised if that's the problem, rather than a driver hogging your memory. Have you checked if there's any page file access while things come back?

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Jan posted:

"Somewhat low on RAM", as in a game engine editor taking up 3-4GB, running alongside Visual Studio compiling a hot reload and a handful of Chrome tabs? Yeah, I'm absolutely low on RAM. Hot reloading is in UE4 has been a pathological memory case before switching to Windows 10 and I definitely ran out of RAM on my poor old 8GB workstation.

I'm extremely skeptical that it's a driver issue because the timing fits perfectly -- System memory goes up, UE4Editor/Chrome/etc. memory goes down. I could always snoop around with WDK a bit to be sure but yeah.

I have no doubts that the RAM compression/decompression is fast, what bothers me is that it's not transparent (Chrome tabs deloading).

It's like a page file but faster. If tabs are deloading that is absolutely not the memory compression that shouldn't even be in your version.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Storm- posted:

Also just wanted to report that the OS is asking me to reactivate itself and promptly informs me that my free upgrade cd-key is blocked. Either reinstall first using Windows 8 or just buy a copy of Windows 10. Buying it seems like a simpler solution because I'm bound to reinstall down the road and it will just go faster.

You only have to do the upgrade once, so both options should be equally fast in the future.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Jan posted:

So, two things:

1. The memory compression thing has in fact been live since RTM was pushed out. It's definitely what's happening.
2. My issue with Chrome tabs going inactive seems to be a tangentially related feature of Chrome where it automatically discards backgrounded tabs when memory usage grows. I'm willing to bet Chrome doesn't take into account the compression store memory and just starts killing off tabs left and right despite that memory being "available". That issue page has a command line option to disable auto discard, so I did.

Huh, I'd never seen that discarding behavior, interesting idea but sounds like it needs work.

But if anything the compression should delay the point where memory looks full, right? Unless chrome is calculating memory use in an extremely wrong way.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Happy_Misanthrope posted:

Not anymore. It's now actually the most expensive option if you need more than 15gb and less than 1tb. Google Drive gives you 100gb for MS's 50, Apple's 50gb is half the monthly price of OD. Not to mention Google Photo storage is free for photos up to 16 mpixels or videos up to 1080p.
They cut free to 5GB too.

$7 for a terabyte is fine, but they made all their other plans worse at the same time.


Zero VGS posted:

What I don't get is how they weren't able to handle unlimited data. I mean, there's deduplication, right? They have gigantic Azure datacenters, right? Unless people were what, uploading a few petabytes of completely encrypted blurays? They really couldn't manage just cutting off the top 1% offenders?
Yeah, it's kind of silly. Oh no, there's several people using an entire 12 drives each. If the average user is only 5GB then what's the problem. Now you get to cut usage by a few percent at the cost of removing significant peace of mind from all your remaining customers.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Just for the record, monitors have had a bidirectional communications channel since VGA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Display_Data_Channel

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


It's also worth noting that 64 bit code gets to use twice as many registers, 16 instead of 8, and that usually makes it a good bit faster despite the cost of larger pointers.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Khablam posted:

You generally get less out of exploits on 64bit systems. Address Space Layout Randomization, always-on hardware DEP, kernel patch protection and forced driver signing make the system more robust to buffer overflows and rootkits.

It's mostly a "cost" problem; it takes more effort and more novel exploits to hit 64bit systems, slightly tilting the arms race in the favour of regular patching.

It seems malware authors are catching up now though, given their only options are 64bit for the majority part.

ASLR gets more bits on 64 bit, that's good. DEP works fine on 32 bit Windows. Patch protection and driver signing could be enabled on 32 bit, that's a reflection of Microsoft making weird choices for SKU reasons rather than having any connection to the actual architecture.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Segmentation Fault posted:

I am going to assume the third unstated monitor is a 1080p monitor.

You are running a 3000x2000 display, a 3440x1440 display, and a 1920x1080 display off of a single device with 1 GB of discrete VRAM (assuming you have the Surface Book model with the nVidia GPU and not the Intel GPU). How are you expecting to not run into issues? This is like riding your dog to work.

13 megapixels is 40-50MB per full screen buffer, and the GPU in a 3DS has enough fillrate to handle that. Don't try to run a game at that resolution, but a GPU can stack windows in its sleep.

Dylan16807 fucked around with this message at 02:55 on Feb 29, 2016

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Sir Unimaginative posted:

They tried to DRM a mouse. I wouldn't trust Razer with a decorative pipe cleaner.

On the other hand, the attitude of people that would rather find a 'make it go away' button than learn how to operate and care for their things, especially things as powerful and as familiar with them as a general-purpose personal computer, frustrates the ever-loving Hell out of me.

I only don't believe in requiring accreditation to operate a general-purpose computer in this world because in this world it'd be corrupted and compromised in every way possible and locked up so it couldn't be used to punch upward anymore, and without a sea change in human nature that situation isn't likely to improve.

No problem with a 'make it go away' button that you need to press every six months. You'll never understand everything on a modern computer, and it's not worth investigating every quirk unless it's either wasting a meaningful amount of time or particularly annoys you.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


The quoted requirements are the same, but 7 works surprisingly well on 256MB, and 10 can't even log in with double that.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


fishmech posted:

There wasn't 15 minutes of warning, there was going on 8 months of warning.

That would be valid if Microsoft had told people "we're going to update you to windows 10 in april". That's not what happened.



What's with all the worries about "another XP"? The biggest problem with XP was all the pirated computers not installing updates at all, a problem windows 10 does not magically fix.

For someone installing updates, XP can use this one weird trick to keep getting them until 2019. If the support burden was really that big on Microsoft, I seriously doubt they would have still been selling a version in 2009 with a decade of support.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Acer Pilot posted:

That's really a file system thing.

It's not a file system problem. Programs that want to can support paths a hundred times longer. Considering almost nothing needs to directly browse the recycle bin folders, there's no good reason for them to suffer a ~256 character limit.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


plushpuffin posted:

Thanks, I'm still on Windows 7, or I might be content with the built-in AV. I was mainly concerned about Avast falling behind in detection compared to the others, although I consider antivirus to be the last line of defense. The pop-ups are slightly annoying, but I'm used to them at this point.

It doesn't really matter whether it's built-in since it's one download away on 7. Worry less about the detection rate, worry more about the security problems introduced by the antivirus itself. http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...8#post461605004

MSE isn't perfect but it's a lot less likely to undermine the security of the entire OS.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


nielsm posted:

On the other hand, the XBox app is more or less equivalent to the Game Center in Win 7, and may be required for the Game Bar and related screen recording features to work. I don't see it as an annoyance the way the other ads are.

The problem with the XBox app is that you can't get into the settings menu without a gamertag, as far as I can tell.

Maybe I'll make a throwaway instead of killing it with powershell this time. I don't particularly want to set up a gaming profile on my normal live account.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


They've changed a bit how the updates work, and I can't find a good description of how it schedules restarts.

Let's say I'm on default settings, active hours 9-5. Windows installs an update at 2am. Does it reboot immediately, or does it schedule a reboot? If it schedules a reboot, how far in the future does it do so?

I don't want to fight updates, but I want to configure windows so that it will not reboot itself unless I'm gone for more than a day or multiple days. Is it already like that, or do I need to change a setting, or do I need to do something annoying/invasive?

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Cat Hatter posted:

I'm just being snarky because I had a folder yesterday that Windows wouldn't let me take ownership of because it couldn't read who the current owner was. I ended up having to download a third party program to get rid of it for me.

Files that deny permission to read their owner exist, but that shouldn't stop you from taking ownership. It can be a bit fussy to do the ownership and permissions in the right order though.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Khablam posted:

Every OS since, like, all of them has broken randomly if you do weird things like decide you know better.
This isn't new to Win10 and has nothing to do with an OS 'as a service.'

Doing weird things to the system is something like hunting around and deleting the cortana folder. Someone doing that has earned it when their start menu gets broken.

Taking the firewall from 'off' to 'disabled' through the normal management tools is not that weird. It should not break the system the way it does.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Well that was fun. Windows 10 can get stuck in a situation where programs that have previously been pinned won't show up in all apps or search. Adding a shortcut to the start menu folder just makes it show up pinned again, not in all apps or search, and unpinning deletes the shortcut. You have to blow away the tile settings to fix it, and this requires either copying from a new user account or deleting the files and using voodoo commands to reinitialize all your apps.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


dirby posted:

I didn't search for "Active Desktop", but stumbled upon a million articles like the one in your link, telling me WallpaperWebPage is the new replacement for active desktop. That wouldn't do what I want since it would hide the icons on the desktop, which I don't want to do.

What a trashy "replacement" then. The real active desktop certainly didn't hide your icons.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Im_Special posted:

I have exactly this problem, and I've never been able to figure out how to fix it, mind sharing your fix?
First you need to delete your AppData\Local\TileDataLayer folder. This requires either logging in to another user, or stopping the State Repository Service.

Then you need to reconstruct it. Either copy the folder from another user, and you should be done, or re-login and you need to repopulate the start menu. It should find the normal shortcuts after a couple minutes, or you can move a file in the Start Menu folders to make those show up. Then to make apps show up you need to run the following in an admin powershell: Get-AppXPackage -AllUsers | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register "$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml"}

Searching some of those terms should find more detailed instructions of varying quality.


You could also try the start menu troubleshooter. It didn't sound like it did the right thing at the time I found it, but maybe it's capable of fixing the problem.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Copying the files is probably the better option because then it can only boot via UEFI. A drive that supports both UEFI and traditional MBR-based booting might lead to booting it the wrong way, and then making the wrong kind of Windows install.

This wouldn't be an issue if you could force Windows to make a UEFI install, but it insists on using whatever it was booted as.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


BangersInMyKnickers posted:

A RCE doesn't give a poo poo if you aren't on your computer for execution.

People are talking past each other to an extent here. Windows doesn't reboot right after patching so that RCE is going to be there for a while, with or without automatic restart. Making the system try harder to find a convenient reboot time does not have to negatively impact security.

From what I understand, what it currently does is quietly nag about an update for a few days before one day rebooting with little or no direct warning. What I would like to see is a system that quietly nags for a couple days, then picks a restart date and announces it with a dialog box every 12 or 24 hours. If Windows would alert the user about exactly when it will restart, with at least half a week of lead time, I think you'd see a lot fewer surprised users and less lost data.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Saukkis posted:

I'm not personally faced with this problem, but I got curious about what effect will Space and Enter have on the reboot nag dialog? What button is selected by default? Will the computer reboot if you are writing an email and press space on the wrong moment?

Right now it puts a note in the notification center. My proposal would be a dialog box stage, with a specific date, between the notification stage and sudden reboot stage. It only needs "OK", really, so no effect from space. But any invasive dialog should have a cooldown where buttons don't do anything.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


So I tested not rebooting for several days after the last round of updates, and it popped up a window asking what day I wanted to schedule a reboot. Very good, really. So the mechanism to force rebooting without having unexpected reboots already exists.

It's not a dichotomy between "no reboots" and "unexpected reboots". Let's not treat it like one. If Microsoft removed the "reboot when 'idle'" code, other code would still force timely reboots. There would be no explosion of vulnerability. But it would be a lot less user-hostile.

Edit: It would also be nice if they stopped changing the mechanism without saying anything, because it didn't do the same thing the last time I put off rebooting for a week.

Dylan16807 fucked around with this message at 04:05 on Jun 24, 2017

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


necrotic posted:

its "reboot when idle within this time period i configure" so, and they are plenty of indications it will happen before it does.

By "period I configure" do you mean active hours? Those don't help at all with the problem of "I left for the day and it installed updates and rebooted before I got back". There's no warning in that case.

Am I misunderstanding how that works? As far as I understand it, the only way to get reasonable behavior is to have something open that prevents the system from registering as idle.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


necrotic posted:

why did you leave with unsaved stuff? and if its all saved who cares if it restarted to update?

i dont get why thats a problem at all.

Not every program can save everything. Some programs can't save intermediate state at all. And god forbid I have an IRC client where I don't want a 20 hour gap in the logs.

With warning I can finish up some things, save others, and make sure I relaunch my active programs immediately.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


wolrah posted:

The answer is don't run Windows for 24/7 service roles unless you can justify the version of Windows intended for 24/7 service roles.

Yes lots of people do it. That doesn't mean it's ever been a good idea, nor that it ever will be. If you want a cheap 24/7 appliance type platform, run it on Linux or BSD.

If you have software which is designed around the idea of using consumer versions of Windows as a server maybe that should have been a red flag.

What's the difference between unpatched Windows Server and unpatched Windows Home except that the first one costs a lot more? I thought we were worried about getting vulnerabilities patched.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


biznatchio posted:

I love how you misread the question as the opposite of what he asked, but still got the right answer.

But to be more clear, Remote Desktop, by design, is tied to a login session. When you log out of RDP, that session goes away and Windows has no choice but to lock because there's no display for the desktop to remain active on. You want something like VNC instead.

You can disconnect without logging out. A single session can go back and forth between local use and remote use.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


biznatchio posted:

The question wasn't about logging out.

biznatchio posted:

Remote Desktop, by design, is tied to a login session. When you log out of RDP, that session goes away

Huh?

I think I did misunderstand what you were saying, but if you're just talking about the RDP 'logout'/disconnect, then I don't know why you're saying it locks at the end, because it locks the screen at the start of RDP connecting. Which is what nielsm said.

Dylan16807 fucked around with this message at 00:10 on Jun 25, 2017

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


ratbert90 posted:

I like how you blame windows and not GTA5.

It's a windows service writing ridiculous amounts of performance data to a file in system32.

It is absolutely windows' fault.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


sharktamer posted:

The official steps to getting the linux subsystem is so confusing. Could someone make it real simple and let me know what exactly needs to be done? I think I'm almost there, I just need to actually get the insider preview update, but it keeps failing every time I've tried over the last few days so I guess I just have to wait for windows to stop being poo poo (forever?)

Settings, For developers, turn on developer mode.

Search start for "Turn windows features on or off", enable windows subsystem for linux.

Run "bash" in a command prompt.

Any instructions saying you need a preview version are old and wrong. Or they're talking about getting it "from the store" which is not important.

Also either one of those first two instructions might be unnecessary at this point, all the instructions are conflicting and I don't have a fresh system to test, but it only takes a few seconds to do them so whatever just hit those buttons.

Dylan16807 fucked around with this message at 17:27 on Aug 16, 2017

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


nielsm posted:

No really, "fast start-up" in Windows 10 means that the system really only shuts partially down, hibernates the rest, and then does a resume on the next boot, if possible. It just leaves itself in a state where it can still safely make a full boot in case e.g. the hardware configuration has changed.
(But a reboot is still a full reboot.)

Not that it's guaranteed to notice hardware configuration changes. It's failed to notice new drives on me.

Even better is that it can corrupt the hell out of removable storage if you remove, use, and reattach all while the system is off. (I'm 90% sure it was fast startup and not normal hibernation when this happened.)

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Medullah posted:

And you guys try leaving a cassette adapter of your mix tape you put together for your crush and see how it goes

https://www.kickstarter.com/project...ette-reinvented

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/...tte_mp3_player/

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Zero VGS posted:

If not, you'd want to buy a cheap USB caddy for the hard drive https://www.amazon.com/Anker-inch-E...e/dp/B00H98AXOE

Then do an in-place upgrade to Windows 10 on the 5400rpm drive, it will come back up as activated Windows 10, then do a factory reset so it wiped the activated Win 10 to a fresh copy with no Dell poo poo, then take the drive out and put it in a caddy, put the SSD in the laptop, boot the PC from the USB caddy, download and install a migration program (if you bought a Samsung SSD for instance, they have a free drive-copy program on their site) and copy the 5400 to the SSD and it'll remain activated.

That seems like a very roundabout way of wiping. If you upgrade to 10, then replace the drive, then do a fresh install, it will pick up the activation. You only need a caddy if you're migrating the install.

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Laserface posted:

it has windows 10 on it already, I just remember in my PC janitor days that reinstalling windows from a retail Disc and using the Dell/HP/etc product key didnt work, because the support and warranty of the software was the responsibility of the laptop manufacturer and not microsoft, or something to that effect.

Oh in that case you're set for life. That computer is permanently bestowed with windows 10 home. (Or whatever is on it right now) The original key is dust in the wind.

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Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


Stanley Pain posted:

Umm, you can get drat near bare metal performance.
Performance only matters when it actually works. Virtualized 3D means going through buggy translation layers with lots of holes in them.

Passing through a physical GPU avoids those problems but you need just the right setup to have new busses and old drivers that work together happily.

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