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  • Locked thread
Watrick
Mar 15, 2007

C:enter:###

I'm going to leave this here.

http://youtu.be/LxfZd_TkCy8

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Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Grimey Drawer

Darthemed posted:



Just finished watching Blood Mania (1970), which had more substance than I was expecting. It was kind of a Poe-styled story about murder, guilt, blackmail, and familial tensions, but channeled through a '70s sexploitation flick. One of the characters made his entrance with the lines "Gee, this is some pad. I dig it." Lots of flanged funk guitar on the soundtrack. Some nice kinetic camera-work for the violent scenes, but with a British sort of distance from the characters in others. Kind of an abrupt ending, but with a memorable image thrown in to cap it. Not that great, but while it was unbalanced with rolling from one mood into a notably different one, it had some interesting material obscured by the goofiness. 6/10.

Also, IMDb says the Belgian title was Pornomania.

How can I watch this masterpiece?

Dr. Hurt
Oct 23, 2010



Choco1980 posted:

It's not quite as good as the first, but it's still pretty great. I also suggest Theater of Blood, to hit the bizarre revenge comedy Vincent Price trifecta..

You guys will have to excuse me, I had arm surgery today, so I can't be long-winded reporting in for the next few days.

EDIT: my post was about Phibes rises again

Yeah it can't match Abominable, but I remember it still being good fun. I haven't seen Theater of Blood so there's another to add to the list.

Dr. Hurt
Oct 23, 2010



Watrick posted:

I'm going to leave this here.

http://youtu.be/LxfZd_TkCy8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCoi1_J1DCU

Lurdiak
Feb 25, 2006



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fapwDPKzXLE

Darthemed
Oct 28, 2007

"A data unit?
For me?
"


College Slice

Franchescanado posted:

How can I watch this masterpiece?
My copy was in this $5 Gorehouse Greats 12-pack, which I'm going to try to finish picking away at this month. It might also be on Youtube.

Watrick
Mar 15, 2007

C:enter:###

3/100: House on Sorority Row (1983). A bunch of sorority girls play a prank on their den mother, which ends up in her drying. However, it's the night of the big party! And they need to entertain their boyfriends and guests, so they hide the body and someone starts picking off the girls one by one.

I've seen tons of movies rip off this format, but I can't think of any specially that came before this. It's a neat little flick. Cannon fodder characters, fun blood and gore, and an awesome synth band playing. I wish I would have had coke to use while watching this.

4/100: The Church (1989). At one point known as Demons 3. It shares a few loose elements from the first two, but it's really it's own entity. A long time ago a barbaric, religious sect of Knights murdered a village of suspected devil worshipers and constructed a church on top of their graves. Now, evil has broke free and is possessing people who get trapped inside.

I adore this movie. The soundtrack is amazing (I own it). It doesn't have a concrete narrative, but instead delivers a lot through imagery and symbolism. It's beautiful, haunting, and bizarre. I also bet that goat monster is a hell of a power bottom. Call it a hunch.

5/100: Lake Mungo (2008). A dramatization/mocumentary of a haunting a family in Australia experiences.

This was a surprise. A mocumentary-ish haunting flick that doesn't have a jump scare? I never though I'd see the day. Although, a bit slow, I appreciated how it focused on the haunting as well as the emotional turmoil of the family. It never felt forced or faked either. Hell, if I didn't know what it was I would have thought that this was a real documentary. After watching it I realized the scariest trust of all: nothing on film can come close to the terrors of the various insects and animals in Australia.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Grimey Drawer

Watrick posted:

3/100: House on Sorority Row (1983). A bunch of sorority girls play a prank on their den mother, which ends up in her drying. However, it's the night of the big party! And they need to entertain their boyfriends and guests, so they hide the body and someone starts picking off the girls one by one.

I have a habit of putting on horror movies with the sound off and music playing while friends are over. I put this movie on as background visuals, and it synced up amazingly with every song. Good movie? No. But shot in an interesting way, with a music video feel.

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



I actually watched House on Sorority Row recently (it's up on Amazon Prime i think) and I found it well above average for a slasher movie of its vintage. I'd unhesitatingly recommend it if you're a fan of the subgenre. Some interesting stuff going on in that movie, particularly the final act.

Dr.Caligari
May 5, 2005

"Here's a big, beautiful avatar for someone"


Franchescanado posted:

No one has actually seen the end of the Friday the 13th game on NES. That screen shot is a photoshopped fake.

Truth


The Visit-

Not the way I wanted to start the month. With decent reviews and knowing nothing more about it than seeing the trailer I had high-ish hopes. Unfortunately, I found it being a found footage unnecessary and the 'twist' was evident in the first half. The cheap jump scares and some goofiness that just don't work also dragged it down. It could have been worse, but it wasn't that good.

/ 5

Dr.Caligari fucked around with this message at Oct 1, 2015 around 23:56

Dr. Hurt
Oct 23, 2010



1/31 The Stuff Based on the positive reaction I wanted to start with the right stuff. At times I wasn't sure whether this was supposed to be a commentary on consumerism. If so, it was probably one of the most on the nose call-outs of fast food culture. What really made this film was the crazy collection of side characters. Chocolate Chip Charlie (whose hands are registered as lethal weapons) and the crazed right wing radio station owning General were constantly entertaining every time they were on the screen. I could have had a little less of the kid, especially since every scene he was in seemed to just be threatened by the titular stuff until getting saved in the nick of time. The other great thing about this film is just how totally unflappable the ex-FBI agent was. He was so incredibly smarmy and brought a sleazy charm to all his lines. Definitely going to watch Q sometime later this month and compare.

Favorite Line: "Everybody has to eat shaving cream once in a while."

cthulusnewzulubbq
Jan 26, 2009

I saw something
NASTY
in the woodshed.


Dr. Hurt posted:

The other great thing about this film is just how totally unflappable the ex-FBI agent was. He was so incredibly smarmy and brought a sleazy charm to all his lines. Definitely going to watch Q sometime later this month and compare.

Favorite Line: "Everybody has to eat shaving cream once in a while."

Michael Moriarty really brings a lot to both The Stuff and Q: tWS.

Here he is selling shoes in another Cohen film:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=Es9Nkla8nQs

cthulusnewzulubbq fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2015 around 00:22

Dr. Hurt
Oct 23, 2010



cthulusnewzulubbq posted:

Here he is selling shoes in another Cohen film:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=Es9Nkla8nQs

This is fantastic. If Moriarty is as good in Q as he is in the Stuff, then Q has just become a much bigger priority for me. I can't put it into words, but just the way he delivers his lines is priceless.

Justin Godscock
Oct 12, 2004

Listen here, funnyman!

Soiled Meat

I tried this a few years ago, failed miserably, but am going to give it another shot because horror movies in October are awesome and I'm so in the mood right now.

1. The Blair Witch Project (1999)

I'm rewatching this one and haven't seen it since 2006/07-ish. It still works at its elements of a vulnerable group of people camping and having no loving idea what's going on (it also works better than most found footage horror flicks because the actors WERE clueless in the woods being hosed with by the crew adlibbing along the way). Supernatural poo poo happens and it takes a little bit of release to imagine yourself in the woods having all this spooky poo poo happening. I camped a lot as a kid and it reminded me of all those times I heard sounds in the woods not knowing what they were and having my imagination run wild.

Edit: /5

Justin Godscock fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2015 around 01:41

Random Stranger
Nov 27, 2009



Dr. Hurt posted:

Are you planning on watching Dr Phibes Rides Again?

And don't forget Theater of Blood which is essentially Dr. Phibes does Shakespeare. It's even more fun if you're a Shakespeare buff.

marblize
Sep 6, 2015


Why not.

Tonight I watched:

1/31: Thou Wast Mild and Lovely - It's a stretch to call this horror but there's often a mild sense of dread, and it does get pretty straight up horrific for a few minutes. Mubi describes it as "retooling Bergman's psychodrama and the impressionism of Malick into a truly unique, primal experiment," which seems accurate. Some interesting urban visitors vs(? [vs is a bit much]) rural locals poo poo going on, which I plan to delve into more this month with I Spit on Your Grave and Deliverance (though this is not remotely comparable to those two).

sexpig by night
Sep 8, 2011



Oh cool I accidentally started this challenge already! I love horror movies and Halloween so I just naturally watch a ton around this time anyway. I don't know how many I can do but I'll see how many I can.

Today I watched Insidious 3 because I had already seen the first 2 and was curious how they made the prequel thing work.

It wasn't terrible, wasn't great either. I liked the girl and her dad, they did a decent job with the whole 'mom's dead and I kinda hate you now but you're also all I have' trope, both of them had realistic levels of misery (the girl can't find time to memorize lines for a school play, he's working a lot more and had to move them to a lovely apartment) rather than the family instantly crumbling to Dickens level poverty like some movies do. I'll still never forgive the series for moving to cheap screamy scares when the first did atmospheric stuff so well, and god drat it horror movies you get a wise mystical neighbor granny OR a tortured psychic, you don't get both, but it handled things decently, and had a level of shallow understanding of body horror that I kinda dug as a change of pace.

The end with the red face demon just popping in to say hi was dumb as gently caress though.

/5, Still better than 2.

CopywrightMMXI
Jun 1, 2011

One time a guy stole some downhill skis out of my jeep and I was so mad I punched a mailbox. I'm against crime, and I'm not ashamed to admit it.


Alright, time to give this a go again...

1. The Nightmare

I've been meaning to rent this one for a while, but I kept putting it off. I was delighted to see that Netflix added it today! This is a documentary about sleep paralysis. What makes this a horror is what the victims experience during episodes of sleep paralysis. Not only are they unable to move, but they all experience similar nightmares while in this condition. The nightmares always seem to involve a shadowy figure invading their rooms, acting in a sinister fashion. If these seems similar to A Nightmare on Elm Street or Insidious, well, that's pretty much what it is. The victims recognize the similarities as well. I find the concept of having these hyper-realistic dreams to be terrifying. The documentary does not cast doubt on the people, but instead lets the people describe their episodes and their coping methods in full detail. it i interesting how some people tend to view these as demonic in nature and others view these as extraterrestrial events.

What really makes this one worth watching is the re-enactments. They reminded me of when I was a kid and I'd get freaked out watching Unsolved Mysteries.


2. Halloween

As mentioned already, there's really not much that can be said about this one that hasn't been said before. I watched this one last year as well - realistically though, it's the type of movie that should be watched every October. It's one of the best made and most influential horror movies ever. What I really like is how simple it is - a white-faced killer stalks and kills babysitters. We don't waste a ton of time getting into Michael Myers' backstory or motivations. We just accept that he's irredeemably psychotic. The movie does a great build-up, with Myers appearing and disappearing in the blink of an eye. It really establishes how menacing he is.

Aside from the great story, this movie has really imagery and set design (even though it's a little too green at times), and of course it has one of the best horror themes ever.

wuLFe
Oct 21, 2010


I've always wanted to try one of these, but never quite managed to kick off the list, so this thread will be my "to-do" list to keep me on track.

Goals:
  • Only movies I've not yet seen count towards the total.
  • Minimum of 1 movie from each decade from 1920 - current.
  • Minimum of 7 different countries represented by the list.

Completed:

So, I thought I'd kick things off by watching what I believe is the quintessential 20's horror film, the much lauded
1: Nosferatu (1922) : F.W. Murnau
My rating: 7.5/10
Several years back I watched "Shadow of the Vampire" which dealt with the mystique surrounding the filming of this 1922 silent classic, and since then I've been putting off watching the film upon which it was based. Having never really sat down and watched a silent film before, I was not sure if I'd even be able to sit through the whole 98 minute running time, but found myself pleasantly surprised. Firstly, the score which accompanied the film (and I've no idea if this was a later addition to the work) was exceptional. The pastoral scenes were accompanied by classical music not unlike Beethoven or Mozart symphonic works, and while the creepier scenes were accompanied by more generic "oooh scary" music, it was still a treat to listen to. Secondly, Max Schrecks performance as the titular villain is downright iconic, and it's easy to see why. Dude was creepy as gently caress!. Having said that, if you're at all familiar with any of the countless Bram Stoker inspired Dracula films that came after this one, there are very few surprises, and the final two acts felt rushed - the movie seemed to fall apart from the strong first half - certain characters (Knock in particular) just felt shoehorned in - they failed to advance the plot in any conceivable way, and several other plot points went somewhat unexplained (granted, the amount of exposition one can do in a silent film is very limited, but I guess this is a good indication of why they moved to "talkies".).

However, for it's place in the history of the horror genre alone, this was well worth watching, and given what they had to work with back then, some of the cinematography and even the special effects are quite impressive. I wouldn't rush to watch it again, since it is in most respects very dated and laughable by todays standards, but for anybody who is a fan of the genre and has not yet seen it, it really is a worthwhile experiene indeed.

2: Bride of Frankenstein (1935) : James Whale
My rating: 7.5/10
Since watching "Gods and Monsters" several years back I've been meaning to watch a James Whale film, and so decided upon Bride of Frankenstein as it seems to be his most beloved offering. On the whole it was a very enjoyable film - disregarding some of the tropes of the time (horrendous overacting by some of the bit characters been the most glaring) it actually holds up pretty well - Karloff is very effective as the monster, and some of the scenes are genuinely moving. Definitely felt more well-rounded and fleshed out than Nosferatu, with a satisfying conclusion, and some interesting and nicely designed setpieces. On the whole, another worthwhile piece of cinematic history, and worth a watch if you haven't seen it before.

3: Freaks (1932) : Tod Browning
My rating: 4.5/10
The only thing vaguely horrific about this one was that the titular "Freaks" were real people. The plot was corny as hell, and the acting pretty atrocious, but some of the freaks were pretty darned freaky. As a movie I think it fails miserably, but is a historically interesting film since when reading up on it, it seems that this movie was banned for many years in several countries not for any violent content (there really was none), but rather because the concept of showing deformities and the like on the cinema screen so disgusted the movie-going public that there was a huge outcry. In fact, this movie killed Brownings career it was considered so distasteful.

4: Cat People (1942) : Jacques Tourneur
My rating: 6.5/10
This was a strange one for me - on paper it was pretty boring in some ways (very little action, and really only picks up the pace over the last 10 minutes or so), but for some reason, I found it strangely watchable. I think moreso than the script or the performances, the cinematography kept me interested - some very nice use of lighting and shadows to create a sense of dread. As an oddity, and a sampling of where the horror genre was heading during the first part of WWII, it was an interesting watch, but barely a horror film, and in any other mood, I fear I would have found it interminably dull, but perhaps I was just up for a slow burn oldie this evening.

5: The Thing From Another World (1951) : Christian Nyby
My rating: 7.0/10
This movie was a precursor to the classic 1982 "The Thing" - on the whole I enjoyed this one, even though "The Thing", while talked up by the cast as been something phenomenally deadly and threatening, was actually basically just a really lame zombie that slowly walked towards the crew of the ice station flailing it's arms uselessly. Some of the standard complaints I have with early horror films still hold true (too much levity, actors never realistically portray how grave the situation is, etc), but still a fairly fun movie - interesting if you're a big fan of the Kurt Russell (or the 2013 remake, which I have yet to see), to see the humble beginnings of the franchise, but taken on its own, still a decent (albeit dated) film.

6: The Blob (1958) : Irvin Yeaworth
My rating: 7.0/10
The first color film of this months sojourn, and a really fun little schlocky B-movie to boot. I could have done with a little less teenage necking and drag-racing, and a little more gruesome blob-fueled death (seriously, I remember seeing the cover to this VHS at the video store when I was a kid and it scaring the bejeezus out of me, but basically everything happens off screen). However, I was entertained, and it was quite interesting to see Steve Mcqueen in his first starring role (for which he was paid the princely sum of $3000 apparently). Basic premise : blob from space ravenously consumes anything it comes into contact with. Teenagers, while (apparently) rebellious, get together and save the day/town/world.

7: Little Shop of Horrors (1960) : Roger Corman
My rating: 6.0/10
Definitely more of a comedy than a horror, the original tale of the man-eating plant and the timid shop assistant is probably inferior to the 1986 musical remake, but still had me chuckling once in a while. Bonus points for a VERY early Jack Nicholson performance that gave no indication of the lofty career the man was headed for.

8: The Orphanage (2007) : J.A. Bayona
My rating: 8.0/10
A very effective ghost story - beautiful locations, good performances, and at times it's even somewhat creepy. On the whole recommended if you're not opposed to foreign/subtitled films, and are looking for something understated and atmospheric .

9: The Abominable Dr Phibes (1971) : Robert Fuest
My rating: 8.5/10
Now this is more like it - with a gleeful sense of humor, great pacing, and a wonderful sense of the macabre this movie hit all the right notes for me. I'll definitely need to check out the sequels, to see what violent mischief the good doctor gets up to.

10: Suspiria (1977) : Dario Argento
My rating: 8.0/10
The paper thin plot notwithstanding, this was a very enjoyable film, and really a tour de force of cinematography, atmosphere and music combining into a compelling, unique work. The use of vibrant color, and unusual shot framing throughout makes this an essential entry into the horror classic canon, even if the tale of mysterious happenings within a ballet school is less interesting than the way in which the tale is told.

11: The Stuff (1985) : Larry Cohen
My rating: 7.0/10
A fun 80s romp, involving a new food sensation that has sinister origins, but more importantly, the complete disregard for the well-being of the consumer in the quest to make a cheap buck. Perhaps more a comedy than a horror, and definitely a little dated in terms of effects, but I'm amazed that this one fell under my radar, when as a kid in the 80s I saw all the big movies of the day (Goonies, Gremlines, Ghostbusters, etc). Hmm - maybe it's because the title didn't start with a "G"?

12: Prince of Darkness (1987) : John Carpenter
My rating: 7.0/10
To many, this is the weakest of Carpenters films, but I found myself quite enjoying it. While done on a low budget, I enjoyed the slow burn as the tension just kept on ramping up throughout, and it definitely kept my attention - so a thumbs up from me. Too often, movies about demons, demonic possession and religion in general end up sermonizing (I'm looking at you, "The Exorcism of Emily Rose", you piece of poo poo), but this had an interesting take on the subject, when the titular Dark Prince attempts to enter our world, and it's up to a group of scientists and a lone priest to stave off the incursion.

13: Possession (1981) : Andrzej Zulawski
My rating: 8.5/10
No doubt about it, Possession is a difficult movie to watch. Nothing is made easy for the audience here - the characters are universally unsympathetic, the tone is frenetic - even during length conversations there's always motion; rocking in chairs, pacing, hand movements, drugged out stumbling, no character is still. The story at face value is a bizarre, surreal look at a woman in a broken marriage, declining into madness. However, the allegorical implications are what makes this movie fascinating, but to say more would be to ruin what should be experienced from a fresh perspective. This is one of those films where you can ask 10 people what it was about, and you'd get 10 different interpretations, all of which have some merit. The closest thing I've seen to an "art horror movie" ever, and highly recommended. However, be warned, I watched this with the spouse and he left halfway after deciding it was too ponderous and disturbing, so your experience may differ.

14: Matango (1963) : Ishiro Honda
My rating: 1.5/10
Absolutely horrible. This movie was just really poorly done, and more a "creature feature" where the creatures are absolutely ridiculously lacking in any scare factor. The protagonists, some of the least interesting and one-dimensional folks you'd ever hope to meet, get stranded on a mysterious island where they start turning into mushrooms. That, however, makes this movie sound much more interesting and enjoyable than it actually is - absolutely not recommended.

15: Tetsuo : The Iron Man (1989) : Shinya Tsukamoto
My rating: 6.0/10
And here I thought "Possession" would be the weirdest film I watch this month. All I can say about this "movie" is that it was bizarre, surreal, and somewhat akin to an hour long lovechild of a NIN music video and a hosed up Japanese hentai show.

16: The Loved Ones (2009) : Sean Byrne
My rating: 9.5/10
I've already written my comments on this one later on in the thread - a superb horror film, effortlessly blending John Hughes style coming of age teen angst with "Saw" style torture and violence. Unlike the other torture films I've seen, this one injected a lot of humor into the proceedings, and was actually a joy to watch.

17: The Collector (2009) : Marcus Dunstan
My rating: 5.0/10
Home Alone 4 (or rather, Home Alone Gore). I might have enjoyed this more had I not seen the vastly superior "The Loved Ones" the night before - this one just felt like an overly dark, sadistic mess by comparison.

18: What We Do in the Shadows (2009) : Jermaine Clement
My rating: 7.5/10
A really fun vampire mockumentary - my only criticism is that the movie dragged towards the end - the funniest bits were those at the beginning where it was just the film crew filming the day-to-day lives of the vampires, and hilarity ensues. As the plot kicks in, felt the movie, while still evoking the occasional chuckle, kind of fell off somewhat.
Regardless, a really fun movie, and definitely a must-watch for any fans of vampire films in general.

19: Ginger Snaps (2000) : John Fawcett
My rating: 6.0/10
I'd heard good things, but overall I just found this movie OK. I did like the protagonists, and some of the darkly humorous bits, but perhaps in my old age I'm too far removed from the trials and tribulations of puberty to really find that much to identify with. Not bad, but certainly not as great I was hoping it would be, given all the love this movie gets.

20: The Brood (1979) : David Cronenberg
My rating: 5.0/10
I'm generally fond of David Cronenbergs films, so was kind of disappointed with "The Brood". It just felt somewhat "ordinary" for a Cronenberg outing. I know this was one of his earlier films, and perhaps he hadn't quite hit his stride yet, but I never felt very invested in this tale of marital and personal problems manifested in physical form. On the other hand, I had just watched the far superior "Possession" about a week ago, and so perhaps I am biased towards that, but I wouldn't hurry to rewatch this one.

Upcoming: (Subject to change)
21: Pulse (2001) : Kiyoshi Kurosawa
22: Antichrist (2009) : Lars von Trier
23: Martyrs (2008) : Pascal Laugier
24: The Devils Backbone (2001) : Guillermo Del Toro
25: High Tension (2003) : Alexandre Aja
26: I Saw the Devil (2010) : Ji-woon Kim
27: Evil Dead (2013) : Fede Alvarez
28: Embodiment of Evil (2008) : Josť Mojica Marins
29: Funny Games (1997) : Michael Haneke
30: Spring (2014) : Justin Benson
31: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) : John Aldritch
32: ???
33: ???

Any recommendations, thoughts, suggestions etc are always appreciated

wuLFe fucked around with this message at Oct 19, 2015 around 03:29

Rivarz
Oct 11, 2004
He who flows like water

Focus of my October is to watch (and make my wife watch) as many Universal horror classics as possible.

1: The Wolfman (1941)

My personal favorite of the universal monsters. To me, it's also one of the most watchable, and the best jumping in point for a new person. It's only 70 minutes long, and is a pretty fun movie. It's not scary, even for 1941, but does have a truly sympathetic protagonist. The wolfman makeup is pretty neat. Lon Cheney and Claude Rains are both good in their roles. Lugosi is in it for like 3 minutes too. There's not much more to say, it's just a fun movie all around. My wife enjoyed it, so that's cool too.

Next up: Hotel Transylvania (We're babysitting my little brother and sister in-law) and Hotel Transylvania 2. (Plus Lurdiak's Scream Stream as soon as the kids start watching something else/go to sleep)

Jigoku
Apr 5, 2009



marblize posted:

Some interesting urban visitors vs(? [vs is a bit much]) rural locals poo poo going on, which I plan to delve into more this month with I Spit on Your Grave and Deliverance (though this is not remotely comparable to those two).

I love this type of plot for some reason. I suggest Straw Dogs (Hoffman), Breakdown, and Duel. Stretching it a bit, but Cul-de-sac and Wake in Fright are awesome, as well.

Several Goblins
Jul 30, 2006

"What the hell do they mean? Beefcake?"



Lipstick Apathy

2. A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night 5.5/10

I'd heard a lot of good things about this movie before going into it, but didn't really know what it was about. It's beautifully shot and definitely unique. It's also another movie with a fantastic soundtrack. That being said, I spent the movie being so agonizingly bored. I appreciate the movie for what it is and maybe I just wasn't in the right mood for it, but I felt like 90% of the movie was just people looking at each other while I waited for something/anything to happen. It might be something to revisit at some point and give it another shot.

Several Goblins fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2015 around 02:35

Choco1980
Feb 22, 2013

I fell in love with a Video Nasty


2. The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980)

The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980)

This made-for-tv docudrama details the story of the unearthing of the boy-king's final resting place by Howard Carter, including apocrypha such as a medium claiming a curse on all involved, to ruthless treasure hunters (including Raymond Burr hamming it up in a turban and mumu) and even the curse itself.

I gotta say, this underwhelmed me. It was on a list of horror movies from 1980, but the horror very light in this the feel of the film being more melodrama and adventure. There were a couple of effective scenes, such as when one dying man hallucinates being sent to the Underworld. Also,, there's some great use of the backdrop of the Valley of the Kings as scenery. However, it's pretty clearly a quick tv grab with Tut being on tour in the states at the time being big news.

.5/5

cthulusnewzulubbq
Jan 26, 2009

I saw something
NASTY
in the woodshed.


wuLFe posted:

Any recommendations, thoughts, suggestions etc are always appreciated

I was introduced to Brazilian filmmaker Jose Mojica Marins a few weeks ago and one of his movies could let you dig into that part of the globe.

Random Stranger
Nov 27, 2009



Day 1 - Not to be too unoriginal, but I also watched The House on Sorority Row this evening and I think it was a good film to kick off the month with. Not that it's a good film, it's a pretty lovely one that existed mainly to rip off and cash in on the slasher films at the time; it's just that if you asked me to describe the most 80's horror film possible I would come up with something pretty much like this. It's a pleasant little nothing, an delightful appetizer for kicking off my month of horror. I wouldn't recommend The House on Sorority Row to anyone, though, since there's nothing that makes it stand out even in terms of creative deaths.

The reason I watched it (besides it being available for streaming and not having seen it before despite being one of the better known slasher films) is that I knew that the television show Scream Queens was pulling heavily from it. Scream Queens has a problem that slasher films, even slasher film parodies, work best like their murderers: in and out really fast with something sharp. The longer form of Scream Queens makes it boring despite having good moments. The House on Sorority Row packed everything interesting that show was doing into ninety minutes.

I'm debating what I want to watch tomorrow. I'm in the mood for something classic, but I've seen pretty much everything along those lines up for streaming. Maybe I'll just go for goofy again.

Choco1980
Feb 22, 2013

I fell in love with a Video Nasty


I'm at my father's house for the night, but I have a book at home on this very subject (international horror film history) called "Fear Without Frontiers" I could crib off of for you tomorrow.

STAC Goat
Mar 12, 2008

Watching you sleep.

Butt first, let's
check the feeds.


The goal, at least 31 movies I've never seen, at least one a day. Rewatched movies don't make the count but I'll talk about them too. Life makes it hard to nail that once a day but I pulled it off last year and came in at a whopping 48. Lets see how we do this year.

I've decided to make Wes Craven a major part of my October in remembrance of him. I've seen a fair bit of his movies so its going to be a lot of rewatches but there's enough ones I've never seen that I can scatter them around. I'm not the biggest Craven fan in the world but when he was on it worked. One of my totally unexpected highlights of last year's October was the Nightmare Documentary that I watched on a whim and gave me a huge new appreciation for the franchise and Craven. Nightmare is the obvious example of Wes' good work (both the original and the New Nightmare, which is genuinely one of my favorites) and The Serpent and the Rainbow is another underrated favorite of mine. But I figured I'd start my month off with a Craven classic I haven't seen in a very long time and then follow it up with a Craven film that I've put off seeing for a very long time.

--- (1) Scream (1996)


A genuine modern classic. I'm not a huge slasher fan but Scream makes it work and manages to walk a fine line between being in on the joke of horror cliches while still respecting the genre. That's something I don't enjoy in a lot of horror camp or tongue in cheek fare like what Ryan Murphy makes. Sometimes you're left wondering if you're watching a homage to horror from a fan or someone just making fun of it or throwing cheap stuff at the wall. There's obviously no question Wes loves the genre and it works because of that. I also really like a lot of the little stuff I noticed watching it this time that I don't really remember from my past viewings. Ghostface stalking Sidney during the movie in the background. Lillard and Ulrich harassing Kennedy early in the movie in their psycho personas in a way that probably doesn't register before you know the twist and just comes off like a couple of rear end in a top hat teens. Its just a really well done piece that holds up, no matter how much the jaded cynic inside me would want to say otherwise.

How about 4.5/5? I just hate giving out perfect scores and slashers aren't my sweet spot.

1. (2) Shocker (1989)


Well... that was not at all what I was expecting. I'm not sure what I expected but it wasn't a TV worshipping serial killer who prayed to the TV for the power to jump bodies only to start killing from TV sets and end up being killed by a remote control and the power of wet dreamstrue love. Wes must have been on some kind of fun drugs when he dreamed up that nonsensical plot. Still, it worked for me somehow. Not really well but something about it was just the perfect amount of 80s camp that kept me smiling through the silliest aspects of it instead of shaking my head. Maybe it was just me being into the start of the season. Maybe it was me giving Craven some extra leeway. Maybe its because Shocker's been sitting on my shelf for close to a decade and I was just interested to finally get around to watching it. But despite the fact that I can't at all argue this was even remotely good (or made any sense at all), it worked for this moment for me.

2/5? Watchable for what it was, certainly not worth much more.

Ok, a weird start but I'm kind of expecting weird from Wes Craven. I think its kind of what he was best at as evidenced in both films. As much as Wes Craven may have loved the horror genre I'm not sure he ever took it TOO seriously . He walked the line between camp and serious. Freddy is the perfect balance of that when he's working. Scream nailed it too. I think I see what he was going for with Shocker but it just didn't work at all, even though a lot of the head scratching elements of the story are clearly things that harkened back to Nightmare and Freddy but just worked better there for whatever reason (probably that evil TV gods just aren't as menacing as evil child killing dream gods). Anyway, I'm definitely going to make Craven movies a big part of my October and I think I've decided to finish the marathon off by finally watching Scream 4. It seems like an appropriate thing since it was Craven's last film.

RIP Wes Craven. This October's for you.

STAC Goat fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2015 around 03:32

MachineryNoise
Jan 13, 2008

What is ON these things?


Gun Saliva

I always plan on mostly watching movies I haven't seen before, but I didn't bother building up much of a stockpile this year, so I might have to throw in more re-watches than usual.

October 1st: Nexxt (2001)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0269624/

I started the month off with a somewhat unusual film. It's a Hungarian horror/black comedy that came out in theatres, but never received any sort of video release (or at least none that I can find). Right now, it's only available via a recording of a television airing that's missing a full half-hour of the movie. From what I've heard, most of what's missing is violent, gory stuff, but there's still quite a bit left.
Anyway, the movie itself is a satire of talk shows and reality TV. The host of the titular show, Frau Plastic Chicken (yep), has invited the man who apparently inspired the character of Alex from A Clockwork Orange. He's living a normal, happy life now, and has no idea what torment's in store for him. At the same time, the show is broadcasting the arrest of this Patrick Bateman-wannabe serial killer, and plans on playing games with him as well.
Nexxt might not be the best thing I've ever seen, and I don't know how much better or worse it would be with the missing half-hour, but it's quite ambitious, and its bizarre and cruel sense of humour makes it very memorable. It seems fairly ahead of its time, and probably would have been better appreciated if it were released more recently.

MachineryNoise fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2015 around 03:48

NuclearPotato
Oct 27, 2011

Brother, why must you be the one with the superior jeans?


I am so pissed I missed watching A Nightmare on Elm Street on Netflix.

#1: Mesa of Lost Women

The version of the film I watched was the Rifftrax version on Hulu. Not one of their stronger efforts, but with a film like this, it's hard to see what else they could do. It's been about 20 minutes since I finished watching, and I'm still trying to figure out how the hell the writer crammed the entire plot development of an hour and fifteen minute film into the last 10-20 minutes, leaving the rest as padding. This includes character development, by the way (the love subplot literally plays out over the course of two minutes or so).

Watrick
Mar 15, 2007

C:enter:###

#6. Dementia 13 (1963). A classic tale of just plain crazy. It did a good job of weaving mystery and suspense into the horror story, at points is almost reminded me of Hitchcock. A 22 year old Francis Copola directed this, and it really shows that he has skill.

#7. Jugface (2013). Whoa. I wasn't expecting this. What a dirty, gross film. The horror element is there, but the reality of the situation of almost worse. Backwoods folk with some interesting "practices" and "traditions" make things very uncomfortable. Despite all the horror there are some touching parts in this. The characters, despite all the hosed up poo poo, are very human. The acting is top tier too.

#8.The Lamp (1988). It's a movie about a djinn, but instead of making wishes it just goes around killing a bunch of teenagers in a museum after its released.

This movie was absurd. After an intro where the worlds most incompetent robbers die, were treated to a scene where a girl's ex-boyfriend continually hits her new bo's car while driving, gets arrested, goes to school and beats the poo poo out of her while everyone watches, pulls a knife on her boyfriend, calls the principal a friend of the family after getting his rear end kicked by a female teacher, then tries to surprise sex the principal's daughter with his best friend a few hour later. The movie looks like it could have been an Are You Afraid of the Dark episode with a higher budget.

I guess when all is said and done its was better than watching Friends.

#9. A Nightmare on Elm Street 4 (1988). Apparently Patricia Arquette didn't want to come back for a fifteen minute role in this. I remember seeing this for the first time and wondering who the hell this chick was. Oh well.

A light hearted Freddy populates this movie with him being less scary and more goofy/lovable. The misogynistic madman throws out corny one liners left and right as if it was his only job.

I've always like the Nightmare series because they're an atypical slasher, which lends itself to really cool kills and uses for FX. This isn't isn't an exception. It's just mindless fun.

Shoombo
Jan 1, 2013


Well, I've never quite managed to get to 31, real life gets in the way, but I'm feeling good about this year.

1/31: Honeymoon. This was a weird movie with a lot of different ideas that it didn't quite know how to juggle. Builds a whole lot of tension through subtle wrongness about all of the characters, but doesn't really hold onto it as the tone changes in the last act. The tension ends up giving way to some pretty good body horror, but the payoff feels mismatched to the setup. I believe this came out at around the same time as The One I Love, and the both have pretty similar premises, but this is the worse film of the two.3/5

BioTech
Feb 5, 2007
...drinking myself to sleep again...

Last year I watched about 20 horror movies during October and I doubt I can manage even that much this year, but lets give it a try! Same as last year I'm only gonna watch stuff I haven't seen before. Since my love for horror is very on and off it will probably include a bunch of classics that I never got around to.

#1 Tales from the Crypt

It is very hard to deny how beautiful these short stories are. They work in a way that feels as classic as most fairy tales and each ending just fits what went before so perfectly.

On the other hand I don't think it aged that well. I get that the movie is old and things change, but where I can normally get into that mindset it was very hard in this case. It also didn't help that the audio was absolutely terrible, with volume shooting up and down, the music have really loud and false tones, but it could've just been my copy.

Loved the ideas and thought it was worth "suffering" through the dated movie for them. Definitely saved the best story for last as well.

Grnegsnspm
Oct 20, 2003

This is the dawning of the Age of Aquarian 2: Electric Boogaloo

I do a bunch of podcasts so once a week the review for the challenge is going to be in podcast form. The gimmick this year is that we are letting our listeners pick what movies we have to watch.

Day 1 is Goth

It is a bargain basement movie where someone actually sent us the DVD of it. The whole thing looks like it was recorded entirely on someones handheld camcorder without any other equipment. It is also infuriatingly stupid. So, you know, par for the course when it comes to the crap that people want us to watch.

1 out of 5 and off to a roaring start this year.

wuLFe
Oct 21, 2010


cthulusnewzulubbq posted:

I was introduced to Brazilian filmmaker Jose Mojica Marins a few weeks ago and one of his movies could let you dig into that part of the globe.

I don't think I've ever seen a Brazilian horror film - will add one of the Coffin Joe films to the list - thanks for the recommendation!

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!


Fun Shoe

2. Psycho

This seemed like a good way to kick-off the next few days, where I'll be watching stuff like Twitch of the Death Nerve and Black Christmas.

Every time I watch this I wonder what it must have been like to see it without having grown up in a post-Norman Bates world. Hitchcock pulls off one of the best tricks I've ever seen in movie history, its way more than just killing off the main character half-way through. Hitchcock basically uses his established reputation as the director of Vertigo and North by Northwest to lull the audience into expecting a certain type of film, and he sticks with it long enough that when he pulls the rug out its a huge shock.

The first 30 minutes of Psycho are absolutely brilliant. Everything is set up perfectly for the typical Hitchcock thriller, Crane is on the run with stolen money, and a unusually clever cop is on her trail. She swaps her car but the cop sees her do it, he won't give up. When she finally gets to the Bates Motel its a relief for both the character and the audience. At that point in the story you might even predict that Norman will be a hero in the film; maybe the cop turns out to be corrupt and Norman helps hide Crane from him. I imagine the wheels started to turn in people's minds as the dinner conversation between Crane and Norman goes on, and he's clearly not normal.

Perkins performance is one of those that can't possibly be overhyped, I'm not sure its every really been topped in terms of overall creepiness mixed with some sort of strange appeal. There are several very disturbing moments too, and I don't even necessarily mean the shower scene. I find the scene where Norman rolls her car into the swamp to be absolutely terrifying, the idea that she's dead in the trunk and the car just slowly sinking into the mud. This film is iconic for a reason.

Basebf555 fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2015 around 14:00

marblize
Sep 6, 2015


Skywalker OG posted:

I love this type of plot for some reason. I suggest Straw Dogs (Hoffman), Breakdown, and Duel. Stretching it a bit, but Cul-de-sac and Wake in Fright are awesome, as well.

You should read Carol J. Clover's third essay in Men, Women, and Chainsaws! It's mainly a surprise sex-revenge essay but there's an aside about city/country plots. she basically posits that they're often sort of retellings of old racist westerns, where the savage individual atrocities committed by the rednecks(native americans) are just narrative devices meant to justify their killing/colonization by the city folk(cowboys). I'm probably butchering it but it's a pretty interesting reading I think.

Choco1980
Feb 22, 2013

I fell in love with a Video Nasty


Movie #3: The Pit (1981)

Jamie is a troubled twelve year old boy. In today's world he would be labeled as being on the Autism Spectrum. He has trouble socializing and getting along with other children, who in turn bully him. He still has an imaginary friend. Yet at the same time he's old enough to display a disturbingly canny sense of sexual precociousness, making adult women who know him uncomfortable. When his parents go away on vacation, he develops a fixation on the college aged woman hired to be a live-in babysitter. Finally, something snaps in him and he decides to feed the people who are mean to him to the monsters living in a pit in the woods. Oh, did I forget to mention he had a pit full of ravenous monsters in the woods he keeps secret? Cause he does.

Man, is this a strange one. It's very well shot in the style of actual children's films of the time, with lots of bucolic music and soft camera angles, staying with Jamie's perspective on things. Jamie himself is incredibly well written and acted, being very believable as a kid who doesn't fit in with the world and makes people nervous a lot. Also a nice subtle touch was in how they showed us the monsters. First we're greeted with noises during a flash forward, then he decides to be kind and starts trying to feed them--first candy, then store bought meat, then finally people. Each time we see the monsters more and in closer detail until we get a fine look at them chowing down on Long Pig. I'd heard about this movie for years, and I'm happy to say it lived up to my expectations.

/5

BetterToRuleInHell
Jul 2, 2007
LARDROOM


I don't have my list of films prepared, I'm doing this on the fly daily. I hope it's ok to post daily with my film updates -- if not, please let me know, OP.

1. Sleepaway Camp

I forgot how much I liked this movie. I originally found out about this movie years ago....on the Fridaythe13thfilms forum if I remember correctly. The weird thing about this movie is that while I don't think many people could name this film at a glance I'd guess that a lot more people would recognize the twist ending.

Angela is played well, and Ricky is great. The assholes are great assholes, and the deaths are dumb but still entertaining, and drat it's weird to see pedophelia so blatant for multiple scenes ("We call 'em baldies...makes your mouth water just thinkin' about 'em"). the music is great too, plays with the frenzy in the scenes.

I give this movie /5

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.


Grimey Drawer

BetterToRuleInHell posted:

I don't have my list of films prepared, I'm doing this on the fly daily. I hope it's ok to post daily with my film updates -- if not, please let me know, OP.

1. Sleepaway Camp

I forgot how much I liked this movie. I originally found out about this movie years ago....on the Fridaythe13thfilms forum if I remember correctly. The weird thing about this movie is that while I don't think many people could name this film at a glance I'd guess that a lot more people would recognize the twist ending.

Angela is played well, and Ricky is great. The assholes are great assholes, and the deaths are dumb but still entertaining, and drat it's weird to see pedophelia so blatant for multiple scenes ("We call 'em baldies...makes your mouth water just thinkin' about 'em"). the music is great too, plays with the frenzy in the scenes.

I give this movie /5

Not only is that okay, but that's what I'm doing. I tried plotting out movies, but I have more fun having to search for that day's movie

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STAC Goat
Mar 12, 2008

Watching you sleep.

Butt first, let's
check the feeds.


I tried plotting out my month but its really more about what you're feeling at the time. I have like a loose outline, a big pool of movies, some movies I want to save and some I want to group together but mostly its going to be what I feel like watching each night. I haven't even really decided what I'm watching tonight. It will be whatever really speaks to me 8 or 9 hours from now.

In the meantime, some "light" mid day rewatching.

- (3). Grave Encounters (2011)


One of the more enjoyable and rewatchable movies I encountered the last few years, I gave this one another watch today when I just wanted a horror on in the background while I did chores. The movie does a great job building tension as it ups the haunting from eery to terrifying to mind loving to WHAT THE gently caress?! They use the found footage approach really well both helping to establish the film crew as kind of douches early on and then going in and out of the action as an unknown amount of time is passing for them in their hell. The effects are simple and scary and even thought it gets really intense eventually thereís really only half a dozen scenes of all hell breaking loose and I love that proper balance of tension to actual stuff. Iíve watched it a bunch of times, Iíll probably watch it again next year and maybe some time between now and then. Iím a fan.

Just donít watch the sequel.

3.5/5?

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