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Ola
Jul 19, 2004



The Something Offal kitchen equipment thread - Just go to IKEA

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Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Ola posted:

The Something Offal kitchen equipment thread - Just go to IKEA

(And pick up some KAKOR CHOKLADFLARN on your way out)

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


Glockamole posted:

I need suggestions on what and where to get a cutting board and where to get a molcajete.

I inherited my molcajete from my mom, who got it in Tijuana in the 80s. I've never been able to find a proper basalt molcajete for sale anywhere, so I'd also be curious as to the answer to this question.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





Glockamole posted:

I need suggestions on what and where to get a cutting board and where to get a molcajete.

just buy a wooden cutting board from a store, it's not a huge deal. you should pay about $10 for one. if you don't like it, throw it away and get a different one.

I've used my $10 piece of lovable poo poo wooden cutting board for like 7 years now. I spend more making GBS threads every month in toilet paper than I have on a cutting board in 7 years thinking about it. I literally poo poo a cutting board, every, single, month. christ just go buy a loving cutting board.

go to a supermercado for a molcajete.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





SA Kitchen Chat : I literally poo poo a cutting board, every, single, month.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010



Man if I held it in for a month I'm sure so would I.

Glockamole
Feb 8, 2008


It's not that I don't already have a cutting board; I have two. I don't use the bamboo one because I thought I read somewhere it's hard on knife edges. But I thought for some reason it was better to have an end grain laminated board or something like that.

uninterrupted
Jun 20, 2011


Costco is selling these awesome plastic cutting boards for 8 bucks. 20 by 15, half an inch thick.

If you have a membership you should check them out.

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010



Soiled Meat

Glockamole posted:

Pull through sharpeners are bad for non-disposable knives for a few reasons that are summarized by ruining the edge and not being able to do anything else. They don't do permanent damage usually, but prolonged use can make fixing the damage a pain.
I know the Edge Pro and whatever variation of knockoff are quite popular around here, but you could get a good waterstone or a couple good oilstones for inside of $50, and you'd have a lifetime supply of knife ammo for any non-serrated knife you'll ever own.

Are you talking about a whole Edge Pro kit, or a specific subset of stones?

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



Glockamole posted:

It's not that I don't already have a cutting board; I have two. I don't use the bamboo one because I thought I read somewhere it's hard on knife edges. But I thought for some reason it was better to have an end grain laminated board or something like that.

Bamboo is fine, and super cheap and sustainable. Just keep your knife honed and sharpen it if necessary. The end grain boards are $$$ and I find them to be beautiful, but overpriced for what they are.

Glockamole
Feb 8, 2008


C-Euro posted:

Are you talking about a whole Edge Pro kit, or a specific subset of stones?

For under $50? I'm talking about bench stones. I'm the kind of rear end in a top hat that advocates learning to freehand.

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

San Jamar boards are good. They last 2-3 years in a commercial kitchen, and are fairly cheap. I(and the health dept) also like the grips on the board, no need for a wet towel to anchor it.

angor
Nov 14, 2003
teen angst

You can go full-retard and impulse buy one of these like an rear end in a top hat: http://www.deoriamade.com/products/...block-with-dots

No regrets.

kinmik
Jul 17, 2011

Dog, what are you doing? Get away from there.
You don't even have thumbs.


I've noticed that I'm frying foods a lot lately because I'm a fatty fat and fried poo poo tastes amazing, but I decided for my birthday I'd like a dedicated fryer. What have you heard about those "healthy" air fryers and do you recommend one? If not, what's a good brand of deep fryer to purchase?

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



kinmik posted:

I've noticed that I'm frying foods a lot lately because I'm a fatty fat and fried poo poo tastes amazing, but I decided for my birthday I'd like a dedicated fryer. What have you heard about those "healthy" air fryers and do you recommend one? If not, what's a good brand of deep fryer to purchase?

I don't have any experience with them, nor do I have a suggestion for an actual deep fryer (I'd say just use a big ol' wok), but I'm reasonably certain those "healthy" "air-fryer" devices are worthless bullshit made to cook food for people who are trying to convince themselves that it tastes as good as real deep fried food because they're miserable on their diets that they're going to abandon anyway and die early of heart disease.

mcstanb
Mar 21, 2011


Since I'm not a sperglord when it comes to knife sharpening, I gave the Chef's Choice electric knife sharpener a go. Got my knives pretty sharp. For some reason, their sharpeners that are designed for Japanese knives are twice the price, for some ungodly reason.

Anne Whateley
Feb 11, 2007
Anne Was Right


The Midniter posted:

I don't have any experience with them, nor do I have a suggestion for an actual deep fryer (I'd say just use a big ol' wok), but I'm reasonably certain those "healthy" "air-fryer" devices are worthless bullshit made to cook food for people who are trying to convince themselves that it tastes as good as real deep fried food because they're miserable on their diets that they're going to abandon anyway and die early of heart disease.
Convection ovens are bad because uhhhh fat people *fart*

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Anne Whateley posted:

Convection ovens are bad because uhhhh fat people *fart*
Sorry but a convection oven that costs 3x as much due to the label, "oil-less fryer" is faddy bullshit and is bad. If you fry food properly you're not gaining many calories anyway and a lot of people who turn to such lovely products do not account for that and will eat more.

/e- Don't know what a good dedicated fryer is, but don't skimp on it too much. The cheap ones do not recover the tempurature fast and take a while to heat up. I like a wok or dutch oven + burner with a candy thermometer.

Submarine Sandpaper fucked around with this message at Nov 19, 2015 around 16:08

Gerblyn
Apr 4, 2007

"TO BATTLE!"


Fun Shoe

kinmik posted:

I've noticed that I'm frying foods a lot lately because I'm a fatty fat and fried poo poo tastes amazing, but I decided for my birthday I'd like a dedicated fryer. What have you heard about those "healthy" air fryers and do you recommend one?

I've not heard good things about them. The consensus I've heard is that you end up with food that tastes like it's been half fried and half steamed, so something which has been breadcrumbed turns out a bit soggy, rather than nice and crunchy. I'm sure it's possible to make nice food in such a device, but it won't be deep fried food.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

mcstanb posted:

Since I'm not a sperglord when it comes to knife sharpening, I gave the Chef's Choice electric knife sharpener a go. Got my knives pretty sharp. For some reason, their sharpeners that are designed for Japanese knives are twice the price, for some ungodly reason.

Japanese knives tend to be made of harder steel, so it probably needs more expensive grinders. Not twice as much though, that's kinda weird.

kinmik
Jul 17, 2011

Dog, what are you doing? Get away from there.
You don't even have thumbs.


So the consensus is that air fryers are gimmicky and bad, which is pretty much what I needed to hear, thanks. We moved into an apartment with awful coil burners, so a wok's out. Would a dutch oven fare well on those? Aside from just getting a deep fryer, that's my second choice; it only helps that I really love making stews and such, so it could pull double duty.

Thoht
Aug 3, 2006



Yeah, honestly, we had a home sized deep fryer for a while before it started acting up/stopped working (as they always seem to do) and I'm in no rush to replace it. It's really less hassle to just use a dutch oven.

Nur_Neerg
Sep 1, 2004

The Lumbering but Unstoppable Sasquatch of the Appalachians


kinmik posted:

So the consensus is that air fryers are gimmicky and bad, which is pretty much what I needed to hear, thanks. We moved into an apartment with awful coil burners, so a wok's out. Would a dutch oven fare well on those? Aside from just getting a deep fryer, that's my second choice; it only helps that I really love making stews and such, so it could pull double duty.

Dutch oven is amazing for frying. I use mine for fries, fried chicken, etc. pretty frequently.

Gerblyn
Apr 4, 2007

"TO BATTLE!"


Fun Shoe

kinmik posted:

So the consensus is that air fryers are gimmicky and bad, which is pretty much what I needed to hear, thanks. We moved into an apartment with awful coil burners, so a wok's out. Would a dutch oven fare well on those? Aside from just getting a deep fryer, that's my second choice; it only helps that I really love making stews and such, so it could pull double duty.

I have a frier, and the main advantage is how quick and convenient it is. You don't need to store the oil separately, or use a thermometer to monitor the temperature or anything, you just take it out, turn it on, and 10m later you're frying whatever it is you want. The downside is that it's a real pain in the rear end to clean compared to a simple pan (ammonia and hot water is helpful for this) and it's tempting to not change the oil very often, which can lead to issues if you're trying to be creative. The oil will quickly pick up the flavour of what you frequently fry in it and that flavour will spread to other things. Not a big deal if you only cook fries and chicken and things, but certainly an issue if you suddenly decide to make doughnuts.

Given what everyone's said, I'd say if you want to have deep fried, savoury food 2-3 times a week, get a frier, otherwise a crockpot sounds like it would serve you better.

AVeryLargeRadish
Aug 19, 2011

WolfDad is Best Dad.


kinmik posted:

So the consensus is that air fryers are gimmicky and bad, which is pretty much what I needed to hear, thanks. We moved into an apartment with awful coil burners, so a wok's out. Would a dutch oven fare well on those? Aside from just getting a deep fryer, that's my second choice; it only helps that I really love making stews and such, so it could pull double duty.

I have a lovely coil range and my enameled cast iron dutch oven works great for deep frying, stews and so on. Also because it retains so much heat the crappyness of the coil burners is minimized.

DARPA Dad
Dec 9, 2008


Do pizza stones vary that much in quality or can I just pick up any old cheap thing? I need one for the turkey I'm roasting this year using this Serious Eats method: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...avy-recipe.html

(family wants a "traditional" bird this year so no spatchcocking)

SE seems to be pimping their Baking Steel but the drat thing is like 80 bucks and since I live in NY, I can just walk like 50 feet outside my apartment and grab an amazing slice whenever I want, so I don't think I need something like that.

Is there a size I should get? Probably a rectangular stone since I'll be putting a bakers half sheet on it, right?

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


They very greatly in quality. For a turkey roast, maybe it doesn't matter.

DARPA Dad
Dec 9, 2008


Any specific one you'd recommend?

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


DARPA Dad posted:

Any specific one you'd recommend?

Baking Steel

novamute
Jul 5, 2006

o o o


DARPA Dad posted:

Any specific one you'd recommend?

Just get a good steel. It'll be better than a stone and you won't have to replace it once a year when the drat stone shatters into a million pieces in your oven.

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



The point of preheating a baking stone is to introduce additional heat to the legs via thermal radiation, no? Rather than spend the money on a baking stone you're not going to use after this, I'd go the opposite route - take the turkey out of the fridge and strap some ice packs to the breasts for an hour or two while the rest of the turkey (dark meat) warms up toward room temperature. If the breast is 20-25 degrees cooler than the rest of the bird when you pop it in the oven, it'll be that much lower after cooking, no? 180 legs, 155-160 breast. That's still a little higher than I like my white meat to be (150), but light years better than most traditionally cooked turkey white meat (between 180 and 5000 degrees, depending on the age of your grandma).

Schpyder
Jun 13, 2002

Attackle Grackle



Pillbug

The Midniter posted:

If the breast is 20-25 degrees cooler than the rest of the bird when you pop it in the oven, it'll be that much lower after cooking, no?

No. Heat transfer doesn't work that way. Especially not in a combined radiation/convection/conduction system like roasting a turkey in the oven.

Hed
Mar 31, 2004



Fun Shoe

DARPADad consider doing the Alton Brown "turkey triangle" method of just making a breast plate out of aluminum foil in order to deflect some of the radiant energy from the oven. Keep probing the light and dark meat and adjust, it shouldn't be that fussy.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Thanks to the recommendation from this thread and its predecessor I have purchased a Thermopen MK4, it is very cool and good, and I have already used it to great effect on some chicken breasts I got the other day. 10/10 would buy again, and I wish my gramma had had one of these so that my perception of chicken breasts would not have been "leather made of strings" for the better part of my childhood.

DARPA Dad
Dec 9, 2008


I found a pizza stone I forgot I had bought like a year ago and used once. It was hiding out in the basement. Don't know the brand but hopefully it does the job!

dalstrs
Mar 11, 2004

At least this way my kill will have some use

Fun Shoe

Anyone have a recommendation on a food mill?

1redflag
Feb 15, 2012

I'm accidentally a suicide bomber!


DARPA Dad posted:

I found a pizza stone I forgot I had bought like a year ago and used once. It was hiding out in the basement. Don't know the brand but hopefully it does the job!

consumerism.txt

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

You could just brine your drat turkey, cook it at 225F for 3-4 hours, and turn on the broiler to crisp the skin. Or go ahead and do fidgety nonsense, granted spatchcocking AND brining is the proper way to go.

long-ass nips Diane
Dec 13, 2010

Breathe.


Dry brine it!

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/11/...anksgiving.html

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Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.


That is a stupid article. Nobody brines with just salt. You brine with aromatics, beer, sugar, molasses, etc. You want your turkey to taste amazing? Wet brine it in Guinness, 5% salt, pickling spice, and a bit of brown sugar.

You want a lovely moist turkey? Just use a 5% salt solution.

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