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Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

I'm kind of skeptical of multiple dies, it seems like it provides more books and crannies that get annoying to clean

Chef'N makes a nice one with double lever action

Edit: or try a mill like everyone else says

Steve Yun fucked around with this message at Dec 14, 2015 around 23:26

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Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


Steve Yun posted:

I'm kind of skeptical of multiple dies, it seems like it provides more books and crannies that get annoying to clean

Chef'N makes a nice one with double lever action

Edit: or try a mill like everyone else says

The OXO mill has three sizes of interchangeable die and cleaning isn't a problem.

Now if only they may interchangeable dies for my fuckoff big chinois, that would be cool.

Croatoan
Jun 24, 2005

Hold the line, I have shitposting to do.


SubG posted:

[citation needed]. That claim---in specifically those terms, e.g. the quote `DuPont studies show that the Teflon off-gases toxic particulates at 446 F'---is something that turns up in a whole bunch of TOXIC CHEMICALS websites, but appears to be impossible to track back to the studies from which this number ostensibly comes.

I mean I could get into this poo poo again is someone really wants to, but the punchline is that the actual temperature at which modern PTFE formulations undergo pyrolysis is over 550 F, and at that temperature the danger posed by the pyrolysis products will be small compared to the health risks associated with all the other poo poo that's ending up in the air from cooking at that temperature. Almost all of the dire warnings about teflon cookware you hear today appear to be predicated in old or suspicious data (that is, data involving PTFE formulations that haven't been used in decades, or unreproducible personal anecdotes).

Seconding or thirding or whatever that a food mill is what you want to use to rice potatoes at home.

Enjoy your autism pans.

Croatoan fucked around with this message at Dec 15, 2015 around 01:27

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004


Ultimate Mango posted:

The OXO mill has three sizes of interchangeable die and cleaning isn't a problem.

Now if only they may interchangeable dies for my fuckoff big chinois, that would be cool.

ok really though

do they make a "die" for the oxo food mill (or is there an aftermarket one or something) that is a mesh, rather than a die?

like really, I want to food mill my pulpy gazpacho through a sieve instead of standing there for a goddamn 15 minutes killing my hand using the back of a spoon and forcing the poo poo through a chinois.

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

Use a 1 or 2oz ladle with a chinois, it's much faster. And no, a fine mesh food mill does not exist afaik.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

I wonder if a tamis/drum sieve would be useful for something like that

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamis

.Z.
Jan 12, 2008

que ojos tan lindos tienes...


Steve Yun posted:

I wonder if a tamis/drum sieve would be useful for something like that

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamis

Maybe, but he should try using the chinois with a ladle first and not a spoon. A spoon doesn't create the vacuum effect that helps force soup through a chinois. So what he's doing isn't any more effective than using a regular sieve.

edit: bleh, realized I was mixing up Mindplux and Mango's post in my head.

But yeah, try the chinois/ladle combo should be a good solution for the gazpacho.

.Z. fucked around with this message at Dec 15, 2015 around 16:34

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004




:bernget:


Thanks for all the ricer/food mill talk, looks like my roommate is getting a food mill for christmas.

Al2001
Apr 7, 2007

You've gone through at the back


I'm looking for a 3-4" kitchen knife for my sister for Christmas. She specifically requested that size (so that's a paring knife I suppose?) and she'd prefer a wooden handle for some reason. Any recommendations? I'm looking to spend like 30ish (~$45.)

What *I* want is a blender to make pestos, curry pastes and spice mixes. I've never owned a blender before so I don't know where to start, but I was thinking maybe I could get one of those little ones that most people use for smoothies, seeing as I don't need to blend big volumes (I'm only vaguely aware of these things, so maybe they're not appropriate. I also live alone and have a tiny kitchen.) Top end budget for this is about 100 (~$150.) Bonus points if it's hardcore enough to crush ice for cocktails.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Al2001 posted:

I'm looking for a 3-4" kitchen knife for my sister for Christmas. She specifically requested that size (so that's a paring knife I suppose?) and she'd prefer a wooden handle for some reason. Any recommendations? I'm looking to spend like 30ish (~$45.)
The only paring knife I've ever really loved is the Dojo, which is just slightly over your price point (I think I paid US$50 for mine).

Al2001 posted:

What *I* want is a blender to make pestos, curry pastes and spice mixes. I've never owned a blender before so I don't know where to start, but I was thinking maybe I could get one of those little ones that most people use for smoothies, seeing as I don't need to blend big volumes (I'm only vaguely aware of these things, so maybe they're not appropriate. I also live alone and have a tiny kitchen.) Top end budget for this is about 100 (~$150.) Bonus points if it's hardcore enough to crush ice for cocktails.
Vitamix is The Blender, but they're not that cheap so the official hivemind response (unless it's changed recently) is to get the Ninja.

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

Al2001 posted:

I'm looking for a 3-4" kitchen knife for my sister for Christmas. She specifically requested that size (so that's a paring knife I suppose?) and she'd prefer a wooden handle for some reason. Any recommendations? I'm looking to spend like £30ish (~$45.)

Tojiro DP petty, 120mm or 150mm for good performance and low maintenance, Tojiro shirogami petty in 150mm for best performance, but it needs a little more care, as it can rust.

El Mero Mero
Oct 13, 2001




So a family member offered to buy me something between $400-600 of my choosing. Before I just have them blow it on a cellphone or something is there some piece of awesome kitchen equipment that people would recommend? I was thinking about a standing mixerbut I dunno. Maybe a cast iron dutch oven or an espresso machine but those are borderline silly kitchen space-takers for me.

El Mero Mero fucked around with this message at Dec 16, 2015 around 03:40

long-ass nips Diane
Dec 13, 2010

Breathe.


Get a stand mixer or a vitamix.

http://smile.amazon.com/Vitamix-Pro...eywords=vitamix

edit: if you get a mixer get a bowl lift model, like http://www.amazon.com/KitchenAid-KP...=standing+mixer

Captain Bravo
Feb 16, 2011

An Emergency Shitpost
has been deployed...

...but experts warn it is
just a drop in the ocean.

SubG posted:

Vitamix is The Blender, but they're not that cheap so the official hivemind response (unless it's changed recently) is to get the Ninja.

The Ninja is fantastic, I picked one up for 20 bucks and it handled everything I threw at it. I made freaking peanut butter with that thing, no problem.

Glockamole
Feb 8, 2008


CHARLES posted:

So a family member offered to buy me something between $400-600 of my choosing. Before I just have them blow it on a cellphone or something is there some piece of awesome kitchen equipment that people would recommend? I was thinking about a standing mixerbut I dunno. Maybe a cast iron dutch oven or an espresso machine but those are borderline silly kitchen space-takers for me.

What about a kitchen knife?

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Shopping for a molcajete. Which one should I get?


Imusa. Spiral grooves.



No-name. Pockmarks big enough to disappear whole peppercorns.

Bhodi
Dec 9, 2007

Oh, it's just a cat.


Pillbug

This is also the silly kitchen gadget / recommendation thread now, right?

My stepfather wants and has wanted one of those vacuum bag food sealers for years. This year I'm going to finally get him one, no matter how silly it seems to me. He wants to use it for both portioning/freezing and also marinading. Does anyone actually use one of these and can give a recommendation on the best one? I'm guessing "As seen on TV" types fall apart, and if I'm going to get him a silly gadget I'm going to get him a sturdy and nice one.

Last year, I got him the recommended mandolin (which he loves) and the year before, a thermapen which he uses all the time, so the previous thread is 2 for 2!

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004




:bernget:


Bhodi posted:

This is also the silly kitchen gadget / recommendation thread now, right?

My stepfather wants and has wanted one of those vacuum bag food sealers for years. This year I'm going to finally get him one, no matter how silly it seems to me. He wants to use it for both portioning/freezing and also marinading. Does anyone actually use one of these and can give a recommendation on the best one? I'm guessing "As seen on TV" types fall apart, and if I'm going to get him a silly gadget I'm going to get him a sturdy and nice one.

Last year, I got him the recommended mandolin (which he loves) and the year before, a thermapen which he uses all the time, so the previous thread is 2 for 2!

Do you mean something like a foodsaver?

Or were you thinking of a chamber vacuum sealer?

Bhodi
Dec 9, 2007

Oh, it's just a cat.


Pillbug

taqueso posted:

Do you mean something like a foodsaver?

Or were you thinking of a chamber vacuum sealer?
Honestly, I don't know the difference. Aren't they both the same thing? The foodsaver is what I was thinking of when he described it to me, with sealable plastic bags.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004




:bernget:


Bhodi posted:

Honestly, I don't know the difference. Aren't they both the same thing? The foodsaver is what I was thinking of when he described it to me, with sealable plastic bags.

The chamber type are way more expensive and can suck out more air I guess. I've got a foodsaver and it has been great for Sous Vide. There are so many models, it is hard to recommend one in particular. I think they are all basically the same in the sealing and sucking departments. Some have bag cutters included, which is great. Some have ports for an external tube for sealing jars, which might be cool but I've never done it.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Chambers are good for wetter things. Foodsavers with the hose are have tupperware to do marinades with.

Bhodi
Dec 9, 2007

Oh, it's just a cat.


Pillbug

taqueso posted:

The chamber type are way more expensive and can suck out more air I guess. I've got a foodsaver and it has been great for Sous Vide. There are so many models, it is hard to recommend one in particular. I think they are all basically the same in the sealing and sucking departments. Some have bag cutters included, which is great. Some have ports for an external tube for sealing jars, which might be cool but I've never done it.
Yeah; the bewildering array of choices is why I'm here. I've never used one and don't know anyone who has! I'd rather spend a little more money so he has the wet option, or if the chamber variety is easier to use.

Sous Vide is next year, now that there are more and more commercial heaters that attach to sides of any old pan like that kickstarter a few years ago.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Every consumer vacuum sealer pretty much works the same at their most basic job: sucking out air and sealing bags. You can get a $40 Rival Seal-A-Meal and it will do the same job as a $150 top end Foodsaver. The question is what bells and whistles you want. If you want to marinate, I recommend one with a built in retractable accessory hose and getting one of those marinating containers along with your sealer.

Test Pattern
Dec 20, 2007

Keep scrolling, clod!


The only bell and whistles I recommend on a vacuum sealer are:

1: Accessory hose port ( and buy a mason jar sealer)
2: Roll cutter/storage, which makes it much easier to buy big rolls on amazon and cut to fit.

Bhodi
Dec 9, 2007

Oh, it's just a cat.


Pillbug

Thanks everyone! I picked up one of the latest counter-top models with the attachment hose and a wide-mouth mason jar attachment. I'll let you know how it goes!

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Soiled Meat

Steve Yun posted:

Shopping for a molcajete. Which one should I get?


Imusa. Spiral grooves.



No-name. Pockmarks big enough to disappear whole peppercorns.

I still need an answer for this

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

They'll both smooth out over time, I'd go with the Imusa.

unknown
Nov 16, 2002
Ain't got no stinking title yet!

Yeah, you don't want "holes" in your molcajete/mortar, otherwise you'll start having cross contamination of your spices since you'll never get it clean properly.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


It smooths out fast and if you season with garlic/rice, really fast. I'd grab whichever one feels better to pound.

Massive
Apr 8, 2004


Also, make sure the base is even and doesn't wobble!

Captain Bravo
Feb 16, 2011

An Emergency Shitpost
has been deployed...

...but experts warn it is
just a drop in the ocean.

For what it's worth, I use an Imusa myself, but that second one looks ok. I'd still probably go with the first.

Sextro
Aug 23, 2014


I'm pretty sure I've that exact same "no-name" model. Soak in water for 12 hours then grind into a fine dust 1 cup of black beans, then 1 cup of soaked white rice followed by 1 cup of dry white rice. At the end of the dry white the powder you make should be clean and white. If not do another wet-rice/dry rice cycle.

This also really quickly teaches you more efficient and safe patterns to grind with. Keep trying different ways of holding until one works both quickly and comfortably.

El Mero Mero
Oct 13, 2001




Swagger Dagger posted:

Get a stand mixer or a vitamix.

http://smile.amazon.com/Vitamix-Pro...eywords=vitamix

edit: if you get a mixer get a bowl lift model, like http://www.amazon.com/KitchenAid-KP...=standing+mixer

Thanks. I'll do the mixer then. It makes me sad though that the spaghetti maker attachments are more than half as expensive as the mixer itself.



lawl no. I don't think I could bring myself to actually use a knife that fancy. I'd go to cut some celery or something and feel like it was a waste of the knife's potential.

Whiskey Sours
Jan 25, 2014

Weather proof.


CHARLES posted:

Thanks. I'll do the mixer then. It makes me sad though that the spaghetti maker attachments are more than half as expensive as the mixer itself.

Good choice. It can also be used to pull pork: http://cincyshopper.com/how-to-shre...our-kitchenaid/

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!


I can shred a pork roast with two forks in less time than it takes to set up a mixer. Might be handy for chicken, I hate shredding chicken.

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005
Probation
Can't post for 26 days!


Might as well crosspost from PYF, since this thread might have some experts on the subject.

Does anyone have any recommendations on electric vertical smokers? Preferably bigguns, at least large enough to smoke a whole turkey, plus some small stuff. Or just the whole turkey.

Also looking for electric grills. I think Weber makes some of the tabletop variety, but I'm wondering if they're any good.

I. M. Gei fucked around with this message at Dec 20, 2015 around 21:33

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005
Probation
Can't post for 26 days!


Is that a "no" on the vertical smokers?

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

Dr. Gitmo Moneyson posted:

Is that a "no" on the vertical smokers?

Got a price range? These are pretty good, otherwise, you could build a terracotta smoker for ~60bux.

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005
Probation
Can't post for 26 days!


Chef De Cuisinart posted:

Got a price range? These are pretty good, otherwise, you could build a terracotta smoker for ~60bux.

No price range in particular; I'm not expecting it to be cheap. It just has to be electric. Otherwise my apartment won't let me use it.

Yes, I've already checked and they do allow use of electric smokers. And I'll be using it outside on a balcony.

Are any of the other Masterbuilts any good? Masterbuilt seems to be the only name that really comes up when looking at electric smokers.

I. M. Gei fucked around with this message at Dec 21, 2015 around 04:31

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consensual poster
Sep 1, 2009



Dr. Gitmo Moneyson posted:

No price range in particular; I'm not expecting it to be cheap. It just has to be electric. Otherwise my apartment won't let me use it.

Yes, I've already checked and they do allow use of electric smokers. And I'll be using it outside on a balcony.

Are any of the other Masterbuilts any good? Masterbuilt seems to be the only name that really comes up when looking at electric smokers.

I have one and I really like the results I get. I'm not exactly an expert on smokers, though.

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