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ROJO
Jan 14, 2006





Oven Wrangler

Rags to Liches posted:

No, but my sister was

She shouldn't have been carving her initials in it.

edit: a horrendous snipe.

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bony tony
Aug 9, 2013



Stop this! It's getting far too silly!

Hermsgervørden
Apr 23, 2004
Møøse Trainer


bony tony posted:

Stop this! It's getting far too silly!

I feel like this derail belongs to me and my moose

BrigadierSensible
Feb 16, 2012

I don't mind taking charity,
From those that I despise

Hermsgervørden posted:

I feel like this derail belongs to me and my moose

A moose bit my sister once ... was it yours?

Hermsgervørden
Apr 23, 2004
Møøse Trainer


BrigadierSensible posted:

A moose bit my sister once ... was it yours?

I’m not responsible for any suggestive poses for the Møøse, just so we’re clear.

Nuclear War
Nov 7, 2012

You're a pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty pretty girl


Was it one moose or several meese?

Edgar Allen Ho
Apr 3, 2017


Quoth James Cameron,

"Nevermore"



They are called elk in Scandinavia.

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Edgar Allen Ho posted:

They are called elk in Scandinavia.

They're actually not. They're called elg, or ælj if you're rural.

Samovar
Jun 4, 2011

I'm not a hero...





BACK TO THE TOPIC AT HAND - in England back in the 1700s there was an actor by the name of David Garrick, who hob-nobbed with the likes of Samuel Johnson and was renowned for being a great Shakesperean actor, who helped introduce it into the pre-Modern era of theatre with reformations to both audience interaction (as little as possible) along with standardising set direction and the like.

However, that's not what I want to talk about. I want to talk about his time acting as Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. Now - when you are acting on stage, you have to act in a way that can convey emotion and intent that can be seen not just by peoples in the stand, it needs to be seen by people in the gods as well. But Garrick was at odds re. the scene where Hamlet is confronted by the ghost of his father - you can't simply say 'Gadzooks' and stumble around like a drunkard, you need to convey as subtly as you can that Hamlet is frightened... unnerved! What happens to people in this state? Why, their skin crawls... and their hair stands on end! Yes... that's a reasonable thing to convey to the audience! But how to do this in such a way that can be seen by people in the furthest seats? Simple! You commission a pneumatic wig that, when activated, will expand, giving the impression of the hair standing on end.

Now, since it was the 1700s, there is, alas no photo of this device. But there is an artist's impression of Garrick with the wig. I think it will bring you joy.

Phy
Jun 27, 2008





Fun Shoe

Also a fun demonstration on how cultural context changes

Mid-1700s: Hamlet is terrified by the ghost of his father
Early 2020s: Hamlet is going to shriek and spit poison into my eyes

Shellception
Oct 12, 2016

I just wasted all my charitable impulse for the day on a wet lump of fuzz.






Samovar posted:

BACK TO THE TOPIC AT HAND - in England back in the 1700s there was an actor by the name of David Garrick, who hob-nobbed with the likes of Samuel Johnson and was renowned for being a great Shakesperean actor, who helped introduce it into the pre-Modern era of theatre with reformations to both audience interaction (as little as possible) along with standardising set direction and the like.

However, that's not what I want to talk about. I want to talk about his time acting as Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. Now - when you are acting on stage, you have to act in a way that can convey emotion and intent that can be seen not just by peoples in the stand, it needs to be seen by people in the gods as well. But Garrick was at odds re. the scene where Hamlet is confronted by the ghost of his father - you can't simply say 'Gadzooks' and stumble around like a drunkard, you need to convey as subtly as you can that Hamlet is frightened... unnerved! What happens to people in this state? Why, their skin crawls... and their hair stands on end! Yes... that's a reasonable thing to convey to the audience! But how to do this in such a way that can be seen by people in the furthest seats? Simple! You commission a pneumatic wig that, when activated, will expand, giving the impression of the hair standing on end.

Now, since it was the 1700s, there is, alas no photo of this device. But there is an artist's impression of Garrick with the wig. I think it will bring you joy.


This is great. Love the ingenuity of the idea.

Ghost Leviathan
Mar 2, 2017

Exploration is ill-advised




Pretty sure Shakespeare would be entirely down for wacky stage gimmicks. A Winter's Tale supposedly would feature in the finale a crowd-pleasing cameo from the bear-baiting pit next door. ('Exeunt, pursued by a bear')

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Ghost Leviathan posted:

Pretty sure Shakespeare would be entirely down for wacky stage gimmicks. A Winter's Tale supposedly would feature in the finale a crowd-pleasing cameo from the bear-baiting pit next door. ('Exeunt, pursued by a bear')

Shakespeare was all about wacky stage gimmicks. Actors had pig's bladders filled with blood under their clothes so that the stabbings would look real, artificial decapitated heads and severed limbs were used as props and a goddamn canon was fired to simulate thunder.

Also, at the end of every play the actors would dance with each other on stage.

christmas boots
Oct 15, 2012

To these sing-alongs of siren songs
To oohs to ahhs to big applause
With all of my anger I scream and shout
America, I love you but you're freaking me out


Biscuit Hider

If Shakespeare were alive today Titus Andronicus would 100% have a splash zone in the front rows

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






christmas boots posted:

If Shakespeare were alive today Titus Andronicus would 100% have a splash zone in the front rows

It probably did when he first staged it.

Asterite34
May 19, 2009




christmas boots posted:

If Shakespeare were alive today Titus Andronicus would 100% have a splash zone in the front rows

Titus Andronicus, a GWAR Production

frankenfreak
Feb 16, 2007

Almanya önde!
Bir başka hedef!
Sonsuz şef Löw için zafer!




The true heir of Shakespeare: Gallagher

Ichabod Sexbeast
Dec 5, 2011

Giving 'em the old razzle-dazzle


Alhazred posted:

Also, at the end of every play the actors would dance with each other on stage.

Sorry but the only thing I could think of was



(by DasBoo, who used to and may still post around these parts idk)

Asterite34
May 19, 2009




Now I'm reminded of the fact that Groucho Marx and Alice Cooper were friends, cus he had old man insomnia and the rockstar in the mansion two doors down kept the same odd hours. Apparently he liked Alice's act, saw it as a conceptual descendant of vaudville, reminiscing about how HE'D bring a guillotine on stage back in the day.

Allegedly he called him Coop, same nickname he used with Gary Cooper

Dapper_Swindler
Feb 14, 2012

Shitposting 24/7 without regrets. my parents would be proud.



Ghost Leviathan posted:

Pretty sure Shakespeare would be entirely down for wacky stage gimmicks. A Winter's Tale supposedly would feature in the finale a crowd-pleasing cameo from the bear-baiting pit next door. ('Exeunt, pursued by a bear')

yeah. thats why i like Shakespeare. like there is alot of smart/deep poo poo in there but alot of it the equivalent of big spectacle movies based on existing works because thats what alot of his stuff was.

Asterite34 posted:

Now I'm reminded of the fact that Groucho Marx and Alice Cooper were friends, cus he had old man insomnia and the rockstar in the mansion two doors down kept the same odd hours. Apparently he liked Alice's act, saw it as a conceptual descendant of vaudville, reminiscing about how HE'D bring a guillotine on stage back in the day.

Allegedly he called him Coop, same nickname he used with Gary Cooper

poo poo like that always entertains me. just weird chill friendships.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Samovar posted:

BACK TO THE TOPIC AT HAND - in England back in the 1700s there was an actor by the name of David Garrick, who hob-nobbed with the likes of Samuel Johnson and was renowned for being a great Shakesperean actor, who helped introduce it into the pre-Modern era of theatre with reformations to both audience interaction (as little as possible) along with standardising set direction and the like.

However, that's not what I want to talk about. I want to talk about his time acting as Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. Now - when you are acting on stage, you have to act in a way that can convey emotion and intent that can be seen not just by peoples in the stand, it needs to be seen by people in the gods as well. But Garrick was at odds re. the scene where Hamlet is confronted by the ghost of his father - you can't simply say 'Gadzooks' and stumble around like a drunkard, you need to convey as subtly as you can that Hamlet is frightened... unnerved! What happens to people in this state? Why, they poo poo their pants!

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Asterite34 posted:

Allegedly he called him Coop, same nickname he used with Gary Cooper

Strictly speaking, "Coop" was the nickname he got from an entirely different legendary entertainer: Frank Sinatra.

Shellception
Oct 12, 2016

I just wasted all my charitable impulse for the day on a wet lump of fuzz.






Dapper_Swindler posted:


poo poo like that always entertains me. just weird chill friendships.

Not sure how much sense this will make or how well-known the names will be, but lately I have been reading about Vicente Aleixandre's (Spanish poet, who got a Literature Nobel Prize) life and boy, it was a trip.

Dude was a big, blond, blue-eyed and apparently very calm andalusian born into the early 1900s and who got extremely bad luck in matters of health. At his 20s he got tuberculosis (apparently exhacerbated by a STD from the woman he was dating at the time), he was bedridden a lot, and by 1932 he had to have a kidney removed. During that time he'd been in contact with a lot of the literary circle at the time, and as he really couldn't do much for long periods of time, his house became a meeting point of sorts for all kind of writers.

Amongst those writers there were poets Garcia Lorca and Luis Cernuda. The three of them would become good friends around that time. Now, both Lorca and Cernuda were homosexuals, and Aleixandre himself came out (as much as you could in the 30s, that is, to his friends) as bisexual during that period, and started dating a man. So in addition to a literary circle, the guy's house also became a bit of a safespace for them and their lovers. Homosexual relations weren't really well accepted at the time, so things outside the circle were kept silenced.

Cue 1936. Civil war breaks up, Lorca is executed without a trial (the killer was later quoted as saying he 'shot that f***** in the rear end'), Cernuda has to go out to exile, never to return to Spain, and Aleixandre's lover, a socialist lawyer, also gets exiled. Aleixandre himself was a leftist and he would also think of exile, only for his illness to worsen. He will remain in bed for the last two years of war, during which he will be detained for 24 hours (and freed thanks to another poet, Pablo Neruda, Chilean consul in Spain at the time), he will survive a bombing in which his library and his piano will be lost, and he will lose his father, all in short order.

So the guy, now nearing his 40s, having lost almost everything he cares for, alone under a Fascist dictatorship, goes into an existencial crisis. But, at the same time, he is still a reputed writer, and young Spanish poets look up to him as one of the very few remaining big figures from the 30s. He will write to them, and also to anyone who asks him for a poem, including school magazines. He gets accepted into the Spanish Academy of Language, a big honor, a bigger one for a guy who was antithesis to everything the Franco regime preached.

So the house becomes a meeting point for poets again, only now it's a lot of young and aspiring kids instead of the big names. Another poet, Carmen Conde, moves there to live in the upper floor: she is a lesbian who has left his husband and is secretly dating a married woman at the time. And Aleixandre's place, again, becomes a safespace for queer youth: latter testimonies will recount how the place was known to be a space in which anyone could freely love anyone. It is worth mentioning that if homosexuality was frowned upon in the 30s, by the 50s-60s under the extreme Catholicism of Franco's regime, it was actually illegal, under jail sentence, to have same-sex relationships or divorce. The best queer people could hope for was to be as secret as possible and not get ratted out.

So Aleixandre's story, apart from his poetical prowess, was that of a guy who not only accepted himself as queer at a time it was not socially accepted to do so, but he lived according to how he felt, and used his fame to help a lot of no-name kids (some of which would go on to become famous in turn) that would otherwise have been left resourceless, both from the literary and from the queer angle. I though that was a neat story, to be honest.

Shellception has a new favorite as of 08:16 on Mar 30, 2021

BrigadierSensible
Feb 16, 2012

I don't mind taking charity,
From those that I despise

Dapper_Swindler posted:


poo poo like that always entertains me. just weird chill friendships.

I am reminded of a thing I saw where Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks were friends because both of them were so insanely rich and famous that everyone they met would act all weird and starstruck or obsequious etc. around them. So they became friends because to each of them, the other was the only person they knew who would act naturally in their presence.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Shellception posted:

latter testimonies will recant how the place was known to be a space in which anyone could freely love anyone.

I think you mean recount, not recant?

barbecue at the folks
Jul 20, 2007



3D Megadoodoo posted:

I think you mean recount, not recant?

I guess they hadn't heard yet that Generalissimo Fransisco Franco is still dead.

Shellception
Oct 12, 2016

I just wasted all my charitable impulse for the day on a wet lump of fuzz.






3D Megadoodoo posted:

I think you mean recount, not recant?

Sure, sorry. Lateposting in there. Got confussed between recount and recall and ended up not writing either, typo fixed now.

barbecue at the folks posted:

I guess they hadn't heard yet that Generalissimo Fransisco Franco is still dead.

Also, lol.

Shellception has a new favorite as of 08:20 on Mar 30, 2021

Zopotantor
Feb 24, 2013

...und ist er drin dann lassen wir ihn niemals wieder raus...


christmas boots posted:

If Shakespeare were alive today Titus Andronicus would 100% have a splash zone in the front rows

The Globe had a kind of mosh pit surrounded by vertical tiers of seats, but yes.

mostlygray
Nov 1, 2012

BURY ME AS I LIVED, A FREE MAN ON THE CLUTCH


Dapper_Swindler posted:

yeah. thats why i like Shakespeare. like there is alot of smart/deep poo poo in there but alot of it the equivalent of big spectacle movies based on existing works because thats what alot of his stuff was.


poo poo like that always entertains me. just weird chill friendships.

Groucho was buddies with W.C. Fields. Fields used to like to hide in the bushes and spray tourists with a garden hose.

Of course, that could have been completely made up by Groucho. He enjoyed that sort of thing. Fields would have liked the joke too.

RC and Moon Pie
May 5, 2011



Alice Cooper's friendship with Groucho was mentioned. Cooper was also in the Hollywood Vampires, with Micky Dolenz, Harry Nilsson, Keith Moon, John Lennon and Ringo Starr.

Occasionally, they'd be visited by Brian Wilson. Wilson, who was known to get obsessive about certain songs, would get all of them to join him on endless takes of ... Shortnin' Bread.

verbal enema
May 23, 2009

only marfans dot com


mammys lil baby loves shortnin' shortnin' mammys lil baby loves shortnin' bread

a fatguy baldspot
Aug 29, 2018



That song slaps. Classic

verbal enema
May 23, 2009

only marfans dot com


a fatguy baldspot posted:

That song slaps. Classic

only one better is that song from the old rear end Owl Looney Toon cartoon

I love to sing-a
about the moon-a and the June-a and the spring-a

verbal enema
May 23, 2009

only marfans dot com


https://youtu.be/7hRSfvpOz4A

poo poo owns

"Owl Jolson" lmao

drrockso20
May 6, 2013

Has Not Actually Done Cocaine


The Groucho Marx discussion reminds me of how like a decade ago my grandmother on my dad's side of the family claimed that we were distantly related to the Marx Brothers, something like 8th cousins, from my recollection this came up in a discussion about my great grandfather(my paternal grandfather's dad) who had been an actor and director in Hollywood back in the 20's(I'll fish up his IMDB page later)

There was also the family story about how her family's farm back in the Civil War had been spared during Sherman's March because General Sherman had been moved by a scripture quote enscribed on the entrance of the estate's church, that particular family legend I have doubts about it's truthfulness though

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Guillaume Apollinaire liked Fantomas.

Samovar
Jun 4, 2011

I'm not a hero...





Umberto Eco liked Corto Maltese.

Cooked Auto
Aug 4, 2007

If you will not serve in combat, you will serve on the firing line!




Speaking of Groucho Marx there's a great story about one of his brothers, Chico and the actress Tallulah Bankhead.
So Chico was a well known womanizer, but also had a reputation for being incredibly blunt about it. If not incredibly crude.

Now Tallulah Bankhead was the daughter of William Blankhead, member of the US House of Representatives and Speaker of the House, which made her prominent on her own right.
Tallulah herself was no slouch in begin a very colourful person. But this thing happened before she became really famous.

The two met at a party and before that Groucho had begged and pleaded with his brother not to do his usual thing and actually behave. As not to sully Tallulah's reputation. Chico obviously agreed to behave. So at one point the two met over the punch bowl and exchanged greetings.

Chico: “Miss Bankhead.”
Tallulah: “Mr Marx.”

There was a collective sigh of relief from everyone else. But then the real Chico came out swinging. Only for Tallulah to counter quite magnificently.

Chico: “You know, I really want to gently caress you.”
Tallulah: “And so you shall, you old fashioned boy.”

Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




Samovar posted:

Umberto Eco liked Corto Maltese.

Hell yea

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a fatguy baldspot
Aug 29, 2018



verbal enema posted:

https://youtu.be/7hRSfvpOz4A

poo poo owns

"Owl Jolson" lmao

Hell yeah brother

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