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Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




It's such a great poem and song.

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Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




Here's a weird thing:

In 1838, Edgar Allan Poe published The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket in which a wrecked ship's crew decide to draw lots for who will be sacrificed and eaten so the others may survive. The man who proposes this, and who is ultimately eaten, is named Richard Parker.

In 1884, the Australian yacht Mignonette sank, but the crew managed to get in lifeboats. They are starving, and the cabin boy falls ill. Two of the three others decide to kill and eat the cabin boy — who was also named Richard Parker!

Miloshe
Oct 25, 2009

The little chicken girl wants me to ease up!
He can't handle!
He cries like woman!



Carthag Tuek posted:

ive been trying to find the perfect english performance of Nordahl Griegs poem Til Ungdommen (To the Youth) but i think it may not be possible. youtube is a garbage platform. the poem was written in 1936 about the spanish civicl war. then fascism spread further and grieg & many others died, and we still have fascism.

ever valid, this is the best i can do: a decent translation with a pretty good singer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nz3rafGZ4AI

in recent years, weirdos have tried to make it something else. gently caress that and gently caress them. it is a song about brotherhood and sisterhood and love and the preservation of earth and love. it will forever be that.

This was incredibly moving and I just want to say "Thank you" for introducing myself and others to it.

PizzaProwler
Nov 4, 2009

Or you can see me at The Riviera. Tuesday nights.
Pillowfights with Dominican mothers.

Carthag Tuek posted:

Here's a weird thing:

In 1838, Edgar Allan Poe published The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket in which a wrecked ship's crew decide to draw lots for who will be sacrificed and eaten so the others may survive. The man who proposes this, and who is ultimately eaten, is named Richard Parker.

In 1884, the Australian yacht Mignonette sank, but the crew managed to get in lifeboats. They are starving, and the cabin boy falls ill. Two of the three others decide to kill and eat the cabin boy — who was also named Richard Parker!



In the novel 'Life of Pi' the Bengal tiger that Pi is stranded on a life raft with is named Richard Parker, and I had no idea that was a specific reference. That's awesome!

Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




PizzaProwler posted:

In the novel 'Life of Pi' the Bengal tiger that Pi is stranded on a life raft with is named Richard Parker, and I had no idea that was a specific reference. That's awesome!

I did not know that!

I guess now the question is, was that raft named after the one or the other, or both?

pentyne
Nov 7, 2012

I just couldn't look at your old avatar anymore
Fucking nauseating!


BasicLich posted:

i dont care

get a load of this incredible Sapphire and Gold ring in carved in the Intaglio style which may have been worn by roman emperor Caligua




e:

side view


Intaglio face (believed to be the profile of Caesonia)


Dumb question but would the fact it's a carved sapphire or the gold band be worth more at the time?

I only know that mining was so bad it was basically done by throwing slaves it and replacing them as they died in a matter of months.

PizzaProwler
Nov 4, 2009

Or you can see me at The Riviera. Tuesday nights.
Pillowfights with Dominican mothers.

Carthag Tuek posted:

I did not know that!

I guess now the question is, was that raft named after the one or the other, or both?

Whoops I worded that poorly: the tiger's name was Richard Parker.

Wikipedia posted:

The name Richard Parker for the tiger was inspired by a character in Edgar Allan Poe's nautical adventure novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838). Richard Parker is a mutineer who is stranded and eventually cannibalized on the hull of an overturned ship, and there is a dog aboard who is named Tiger. Martel also had another occurrence in mind in the famous legal case R v Dudley and Stephens (1884), where a shipwreck again results in the cannibalism of a cabin boy named Richard Parker, this time in a lifeboat.[15] A third Richard Parker drowned in the sinking of the Francis Spaight in 1846, described by author Jack London, and later the cabin boy was cannibalized. "So many victimized Richard Parkers had to mean something", Martel suggested

Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




PizzaProwler posted:

Whoops I worded that poorly: the tiger's name was Richard Parker.

lmao a third one, wtf. this is like an opening segment in Magnolia

re: above
the carved sapphire for sure would be the expensive part. With gold you can bang out mistakes, but if you gently caress up a gem cut, its ruined & you have to find a new one (until the recent advent of "artificial" gems that are in all ways better than ones produced by slavery)

Carthag Tuek has a new favorite as of 22:40 on Apr 29, 2021

Cacafuego
Jul 22, 2007



BasicLich posted:

i dont care

get a load of this incredible Sapphire and Gold ring in carved in the Intaglio style which may have been worn by roman emperor Caligua




e:

side view


Intaglio face (believed to be the profile of Caesonia)


Caligula, eh? How many buttholes has that thing been stuck in?

E: and other orifices, I suppose

CHIMlord
Jun 30, 2012


Carthag Tuek posted:

Here's a weird thing:

In 1838, Edgar Allan Poe published The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket in which a wrecked ship's crew decide to draw lots for who will be sacrificed and eaten so the others may survive. The man who proposes this, and who is ultimately eaten, is named Richard Parker.

In 1884, the Australian yacht Mignonette sank, but the crew managed to get in lifeboats. They are starving, and the cabin boy falls ill. Two of the three others decide to kill and eat the cabin boy — who was also named Richard Parker!



Richard Parker is why duress is not a defence to a murder charge under British common law (nor "law of the sea", which was another defence the sailors attempted). I always wonder why they would tell people that they killed and ate a teenage boy. Nobody would have to find out!

Gaius Marius
Oct 9, 2012



I'm pretty sure you're supposed to draw lots if you want the forbidden meat.

Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




CHIMlord posted:

Richard Parker is why duress is not a defence to a murder charge under British common law (nor "law of the sea", which was another defence the sailors attempted). I always wonder why they would tell people that they killed and ate a teenage boy. Nobody would have to find out!

as far as i can tell, there are two main reasons that they didn't keep it secret.

first one being the "custom of the sea", which was generally considered permissible, so they didnt think of themselves as having committed a crime. afaik you can still eat people to survive and not go to jail in most countries, so long as you dont kill them first. duress is fine for eatin, not for kilin. i guess that part wasnt on the books yet back then. theres the precedent

second being utilitarianism: the cabin boy was an orphan, whereas the ones who ate him had wives and children. they were clearly worth more to society than he was. "cmon, you woulda preferred the orphan cabin boy eat a married father?"

plus its a pretty badass story if youre a scurvy seadog

but yeah they could totally just have shoved the last guy overboard, ate the kid & got off scot free if they didnt talk about it

Carthag Tuek has a new favorite as of 01:32 on Apr 30, 2021

CHIMlord
Jun 30, 2012


Yeah, I guess I forgot that they didn't have the benefit of hindsight like us. BTW, the court case regarding Parker's murder is R v Dudley and Stephens, who were the two sailors who actually killed Parker (the fourth man in the lifeboat, Brooks, refused to help kill Parker but did eat his blood and flesh). Amusingly, Parker's brother Daniel met the 3 men during their bench appearance and even shook their hands! For what it's worth, he was a seaman too.

Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




i mean on the one hand, these dudes killed and ate your brother, but on the other hand you will definitely be ostracized if you dont shake their hand. you will never see a friend again, and for the rest of your life, you will be as hungry as they were

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Der Kyhe posted:

Dude you can take a rowboat from Denmark to Sweden if you really need to. You can literally see from Malmö harbor to the Denmark.

...I know?

Alhazred posted:

As demonstrated by the poem Terje Vigen:
The smallest dory there was to hand
he chose for his Skagen trip.
Sail and mast he left home on land,-
such gear he thought best not ship.
He reckoned, did Terje, the boat would steer
though seas ram a bit a-beam;
the Jutland reef was the devil to clear,-
but worse, he'd the English blockade to fear,
its look-out's eagle-eyed gleam.
Then trusting to fortune's grace profound
he smartly took on the oars.
At Fladstrand, reaching there safe and sound,
he gathered his precious stores.
God knows his cargo was nothing grand:
three casks of barley, that's all;
but Terje came from a wretched land,-
and here was the staff of life to hand;
and his wife and baby call.
He slaved on the thwart for three nights and days,
that brave and powerful man;
the fourth, at dawn, by sun's first rays,
a blurred, misty line to scan.
It wasn't the skeltering clouds he spied,
it was mountain and summit and brae:
but high above the ridges' pride,
Imenes-Saddle, blue and wide.
He knew then just where he lay.


The poem is about a man trying to smuggle food to his wife and kids during the british blockade of Norway in 1809.

I'm starting to think these british aren't up to any good

Milo and POTUS has a new favorite as of 12:34 on Apr 30, 2021

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Milo and POTUS posted:



I'm starting to think these british aren't up to any good

Yeah:
They lifted him out, and over the side,
the victory salvo rolled;
there on the poop-deck, stiff with pride,
the captain, an eighteen-year-old.
His first sea-encounter was Terje's boat,
his arrogance knew no check:-
but Terje knew any help was remote,-
that strong man collapsed, with sobbing throat
to plead on his knees on deck.
He offered his sorrow, they sold him their glee,
they bartered with scorn for prayer.
It blew from the east, so with speed to sea
stood England's conquering heir.
Then Terje fell silent; all hope was past,
he locked up his grief in his soul.
Yet non of his captors but marked how fast,
like warning of storm before the blast,
the clouds on his brow would roll.
He languished in prison for many a day,
for all five years, say some;
his shoulders rounded, his hair it turned grey
from dreaming about his home.
Something he brooded but hid like some hoard,
his only resource, from men's view.
Then eighteen-fourteen came and with it accord;
a Swedish frigate brought home onboard
Norways's prisoners, and Terje too.
Back at the jetty he came ashore,
a pilot by King's decree;
but few recalled in the greybeard they saw
the youngster who braved the sea.
His house was a stranger's; and how they fared
those two,- that was easily found:
'The husband forsook them, and nobody cared,
they came to the plot that the paupers shared
in the parish burial-ground.'-

christmas boots
Oct 15, 2012

To these sing-alongs of siren songs
To oohs to ahhs to big applause
With all of my anger I scream and shout
America, I love you but you're freaking me out


Biscuit Hider

Carthag Tuek posted:

as far as i can tell, there are two main reasons that they didn't keep it secret.

first one being the "custom of the sea", which was generally considered permissible, so they didnt think of themselves as having committed a crime. afaik you can still eat people to survive and not go to jail in most countries, so long as you dont kill them first. duress is fine for eatin, not for kilin. i guess that part wasnt on the books yet back then. theres the precedent

second being utilitarianism: the cabin boy was an orphan, whereas the ones who ate him had wives and children. they were clearly worth more to society than he was. "cmon, you woulda preferred the orphan cabin boy eat a married father?"

plus its a pretty badass story if youre a scurvy seadog

but yeah they could totally just have shoved the last guy overboard, ate the kid & got off scot free if they didnt talk about it

I remember first hearing about this case when I was watching recording of Michael Sandel's justice course. He'd opened the lecture with three versions of the trolley problem just to get conversation going (the whole thing was done in a kind of Socratic style) and then pivoted right into utilitarianism and this case.

I thought it was pretty well done tbh

Chamale
Jul 11, 2010

I'm helping!





The sailors confessed because they didn't think they had done anything wrong, a better lawyer could have argued temporary insanity. Now sailors know that when they draw lots to eat somebody, it's best to say he died of natural causes first.

Nessus
Dec 22, 2003

To witness titanic events is always dangerous, usually painful, and often fatal.





Carthag Tuek posted:

Here's a weird thing:

In 1838, Edgar Allan Poe published The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket in which a wrecked ship's crew decide to draw lots for who will be sacrificed and eaten so the others may survive. The man who proposes this, and who is ultimately eaten, is named Richard Parker.

In 1884, the Australian yacht Mignonette sank, but the crew managed to get in lifeboats. They are starving, and the cabin boy falls ill. Two of the three others decide to kill and eat the cabin boy — who was also named Richard Parker!


You want to know another fun fact about Edgar Allen Poe? Beyond that discovery of the blessing of the man from Nantucket.

He was the first person to propose a resolution to Olbers' paradox, i.e. "If the universe is infinite, static and unchanging, there should be no point in the night sky which did not have a star in it, and therefore, the night sky should be insanely bright." Poe's solution:

quote:

Were the succession of stars endless, then the background of the sky would present us a uniform luminosity, like that displayed by the Galaxy – since there could be absolutely no point, in all that background, at which would not exist a star. The only mode, therefore, in which, under such a state of affairs, we could comprehend the voids which our telescopes find in innumerable directions, would be by supposing the distance of the invisible background so immense that no ray from it has yet been able to reach us at all.

hawowanlawow
Jul 27, 2009



It's easy to forget just how fuckin early Poe was writing sometimes

ChubbyChecker
Mar 25, 2018



hawowanlawow posted:

It's easy to forget just how fuckin early Poe was sometimes

yeah, he married his 13 year old cousin

Milo and POTUS
Sep 3, 2017

I will not shut up about the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. I talk about them all the time and work them into every conversation I have. I built a shrine in my room for the yellow one who died because sadly no one noticed because she died around 9/11. Wanna see it?


Holy poo poo

christmas boots
Oct 15, 2012

To these sing-alongs of siren songs
To oohs to ahhs to big applause
With all of my anger I scream and shout
America, I love you but you're freaking me out


Biscuit Hider

Edgar Allen Pedo

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Carthag Tuek posted:

ive been trying to find the perfect english performance of Nordahl Griegs poem Til Ungdommen (To the Youth) but i think it may not be possible. youtube is a garbage platform. the poem was written in 1936 about the spanish civicl war. then fascism spread further and grieg & many others died, and we still have fascism.

About Nordahl Grieg. He was the great-great-grandson of the man who wrote the national anthem of Norway and also related to composer Edvard Grieg. He was a correspondent in China in 1927. He studied film in the Soviet Union from 1933 to 1935 where he became a supporter of Stalin. He was chairman for Friends of the Soviet Union and wrote a defense for the Moscow Trials. In 1937 he went to Spain to cover the civil war. When Germany invaded Norway he joined up and served as a guard on the ship that carried the royal family and Norway's gold reserve to Britain. There he worked as a war correspondent. In 1943 he joined the crew a Lancaster Mk.III on raid over Berlin, the plane was shot down and Grieg was killed in the crash. His body was never recovered.

NFX
Jun 1, 2008



Fun Shoe

Fearful your question,
Defenseless, open,
What shall I fight with?
Where is my weapon?

Here is your battle plan,
Here is your shield:

Get a Lancaster Mk III!

Samovar
Jun 4, 2011

I'm not a hero...





Milo and POTUS posted:

I'm starting to think these british aren't up to any good

Whatever happens
We have got
The Maxim gun
And they have not.

There we go, now you never need to read anything more to understand the theory of colonialism.

Der Kyhe
Jun 25, 2008

Think something witty and pretend it's written here.



Samovar posted:

Whatever happens
We have got
The Maxim gun
And they have not.

There we go, now you never need to read anything more to understand the theory of colonialism.

There was a minor uproar when in one of the Paradox Entertainment's colorful Excel sheet simulators, Victoria 2 the key technologies to start large scale colonization and warfare in Asia and Africa were the machine gun, and gas warfare.

They weren't exactly wrong but still great job PR-wise.

venus de lmao
Apr 29, 2007

Call me "pixeltits"



Samovar posted:

Whatever happens
We have got
The Maxim gun
And they have not.

Burma-Shave

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Today is the norwegian Liberation Day. The date that Nazi-Germany capitulated and Norway was liberated from german occupation. My grandfather used to tell us about how he and some of his buddies was sent to liberate a military camp. He admitted to being nervous about weather or not the soldiers knew about the capitulation. Luckily all the top brass knew which way the wind was blowing and was long gone and the once who remained capitulated without any resistance.

Carthag Tuek
Oct 15, 2005

Tider skal komme,
tider skal henrulle,
slægt skal følge slægters gang




først så tar vi göring i hans fede ben
derpå tar vi goebbels og slår ham med en sten
så hænger vi hitler i en strop
ved siden af von ribbentrop

så blir de rent til grin
de fire nazisvin

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011







(the title of this sculpture is literally Smash Nazism)

Arban
Aug 28, 2017


Alhazred posted:


(the title of this sculpture is literally Smash Nazism)

My favorite bit of public artwork tbh. (you can't tell from that angle, but the hammer is literally smashing a swastika.)

Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Symbols you could use to show your resistance to the germans during the occupation: A paperclip ("we are bound together"), a comb (it's an untranslatable norwegian pun, but the point was "we'll be okay"), a red knitted cap, jewelry made of coins (norwegain coins had the king's monogram) and a flower. My grandmother was actually brought into questioning by the germans because she wore a flower on her jacket, she managed to convince the germans that she has no idea what it meant. That she just thought it was a pretty flower.

Or you could get more creative:

("Long live the king")

Engage in vandalism:


(H7 was the monogram of king Haakon 7th, the king during the war)

And finally, you could get yourself a gun:

Alhazred has a new favorite as of 19:09 on May 8, 2021

Biplane
Jul 18, 2005



Alhazred posted:

Today is the norwegian Liberation Day. The date that Nazi-Germany capitulated and Norway was liberated from german occupation. My grandfather used to tell us about how he and some of his buddies was sent to liberate a military camp. He admitted to being nervous about weather or not the soldiers knew about the capitulation. Luckily all the top brass knew which way the wind was blowing and was long gone and the once who remained capitulated without any resistance.

When I was in the norwegian army I got to visit a ton of the old defunct bases, plus a bunch of the ones still in use, and so much of it still comes from old german wartime construction. Also we got to know the top half of the country had been wired to blow in case the russians came, so every road, tunnel, bridge, goat track, ford, crossroads, and any big trees were wired with dynamite until some time in the late 90s.

Azhais
Feb 5, 2007


Switchblade Switcharoo

So you're saying Norway is vulnerable to a Russian attack

NFX
Jun 1, 2008



Fun Shoe

No, they've just switched to wireless these days.

The Swiss were also doing that during the Cold War, and I imagine they haven't taken down any explosives.

Biplane
Jul 18, 2005



Azhais posted:

So you're saying Norway is vulnerable to a Russian attack

yes, although thanks to nazi germany and their extensive coastal fortifications built literally up and down the entire norwegian coastline, we're slightly more prepared to face a seaborne invasion.

christmas boots
Oct 15, 2012

To these sing-alongs of siren songs
To oohs to ahhs to big applause
With all of my anger I scream and shout
America, I love you but you're freaking me out


Biscuit Hider

Azhais posted:

So you're saying Norway is vulnerable to a Russian attack

As chronicled in the Norwegian thriller series Okkupert

doverhog
May 31, 2013

Sometimes I just get tired of thinking of all the things that I do not wanna do. All the things that I do not wanna be. Places I do not wanna go.


Azhais posted:

So you're saying Norway is vulnerable to a Russian attack

Norway and Sweden have a defense policy against Russian invasion: knowing they have to go through Finland (or east Sweden as it used to be called) first.

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Alhazred
Feb 16, 2011






Azhais posted:

So you're saying Norway is vulnerable to a Russian attack


Please don't tell them

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