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LingcodKilla
Dec 28, 2002

I ate too much crab and transformed into this.


Godholio posted:

Not even close. Hell, the crab man was 37(?) when he joined the Navy Reserve.

My question to everyone interested in joining is "What do you want to do afterwards?" If the military is the best way to get there, so be it...but that's rarely the case.

Yeah and honestly it's worked out for me so far 5 years later. However I didnt have no higher aspirations than boy scouts with pay, a break from my normal routine and health insurance not connected to my main job. My AT's have been a joke, my school was fun and some long term orders I picked up were ridiculously lucrative (hell I even got sent to Fleet Week NYC). There's been some stress but nothing I couldnt ultimately handle. It's time to pay the piper though and I'm being mobilized for almost a year to a ship. A USNS ship in the Mediterranean. OH NOOOOOOOOOooooooooo..... lol


I'll add that the hardest part of being in has been seeing multiple female sailors I worked with leave the service for surprise sex or sexual assaults. These girls are young enough to be my daughters and I even warned one before she left for boot camp. It still eats me up I couldnt help them.

LingcodKilla fucked around with this message at 05:36 on Aug 1, 2019

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Volkerball
Oct 15, 2009

by FactsAreUseless


bird food bathtub posted:

Can you even join in your 30s? I was considered old as gently caress joining in my mid-20s, like that was literally my basic nickname, and I was pretty sure I was bumping up against the cutoff age.

Even if you somehow can you'd still be one stupid motherfucker to do it.

They change the cut off age depending on how desperate they are. I went to infantry OSUT in the summer of 07 during the surge and we had guys in there well into their 40's. Plus guys pushing 300 pounds.

not a value-add
Jan 17, 2019



Well sounds like my "get a clearance by commissioning" plan was bad and dumb. I'll look at other opportunities, thanks guys.

UP THE BUM NO BABY
Sep 1, 2011

Man-oh-man, Cowboy looks like a bag of leftovers from a V.F.W. barbecue. Of
course, I've got nothing against dead people. Why, some of my best friends are dead

not a value-add posted:

Well sounds like my "get a clearance by commissioning" plan was bad and dumb. I'll look at other opportunities, thanks guys.

Don't give up so easily. You should seriously consider 18X.

Unless you don't want to be Special Forces

Midjack
Dec 24, 2007






Biscuit Hider

not a value-add posted:

Hey guys, I have a somewhat specific question: I'm a recent college grad looking at the psyops officer position as a reservist. Is this available right off the bat or will I have to spend several years in another role before I'm eligible?

More generally, I'm looking to sign up as a way to get my foot in the door for a career in the intelligence community. Is this a really bad idea? I've reached out to a recruiter, but like other posters in this thread I feel like I should take what they tell me with a grain of salt.

If you want a job in the intelligence community, apply directly there rather than wasting time in the military first.

Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


I can teach you powerpoint to the same level that .mil intel experience would give you.

$1000. I take paypal or venmo.

not a value-add
Jan 17, 2019



Midjack posted:

If you want a job in the intelligence community, apply directly there rather than wasting time in the military first.

Yeah that would make a lot more sense, wouldn't it?

Just to give some firsthand testimony for the other people reading this thread: I went to go get some information about the commissioning process from a local recruiting office because everything I could find online seemed either really vague or out of date. Ended up spending like two and a half hours there while they explained all the different schools you get sent to as part of the process when what I really wanted to know was the current staffing levels and my chances of getting stuck peeling potatoes or whatever. They had me take a practice asvab that had a bunch of typos and math questions that did not have a correct answer. Then they gave me a bunch of paperwork/letters of recommendation to go round up and added me to their computer system.

Everyone there was very friendly, but they also really push the sale to get you to sign up as soon as possible. I told the guy I needed to think about it. Hopefully he's not grumpy when I call him back with a soft no next week.

EBB
Feb 15, 2005

What, Me Worry?


Recruiters don't care what you want, they just need to fill numbers that month. It's also the one time the military will even pretend to negotiate with you.

Mustang
Jun 18, 2006


Have you considered not attending the Captain's Career Course?


Junior officers are generally always over strength due to having to compensate for some of them getting out. May be different for smaller branches but this is definitely true for armor, infantry, FA and probably engineers as well.

"Peeling potatoes" for an officer is more like being put in charge of stuff that your immediate superior doesn't want to deal with. You're never going to find yourself painting rocks or pulling weeds. There's no shortage of stuff for an officer to do on staff. If there's an officer that has been given very little responsibility then that's because he's been found to be too incompetent to be given anything remotely important.

Recruiters are also not at all going to have any idea what officer manning is like. The only way you would be able to get that kind of information is from a units Officer Strength Manager/S1 or from a branches LT and CPT managers at HRC.

I'm also not sure how reservist or National Guard positions get your foot in the door for anything. With their one weekend a month and 2 weeks a year none of the Guard/Reserve units I've trained with seem to have any idea on how to do Army stuff unless they've recently deployed.

bird food bathtub
Aug 9, 2003



College Slice

Mustang posted:

unless they've recently deployed.

Mighty generous of you to assume they know that just because they deployed.

Naked Bear
Apr 15, 2007

Boners was recorded before a studio audience that was alive!


Mustang posted:

With their one weekend a month and 2 weeks a year none of the Guard/Reserve units I've trained with seem to have any idea on how to do Army stuff unless they've recently deployed.
To be fair, neither does the Regular Army.

not a value-add
Jan 17, 2019



Yeah, it sounded like the reserves can quickly turn into a worst of both worlds situation if you get a unit that starts doing 4-day drills and has bad scheduling. It starts seriously messing with your civilian job, and because you get the crappy underfunded version of all the training you don't get anything out of the military side of things either.

On the staffing stuff, when I was sitting down flipping through the packet of paperwork they gave me the guy pulled up a map with all the local reserve units on his computer and was clicking through that. Each one had a list of positions with a number of what I think were vacancies and a column indicating if it was overstaffed or not. So it seemed that they have some version of that information available. Nothing for active duty though.

not a value-add fucked around with this message at 18:50 on Aug 3, 2019

Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


It exists, it's just not available to everyone.

Flying_Crab
Apr 12, 2002



Naked Bear posted:

To be fair, neither does the Regular Army.

In my experience the regular Army is equally incompetent, they just have this Dunning-Kruger type deal where they're unaware of being incompetent.

SpaceSDoorGunner
May 4, 2018



I'm seeing all these 18x recommendations and not a single SEAL challenge, for shame.

A White Guy
Dec 19, 2012

Never fear!
Japan is here!


Hey guys,

So, my old man was a Navy lifer and has been light-weight pressuring me to commission for years and years. The hitch is that I'm autistic. I was diagnosed at a very young age and put through specialized schooling(not straight up special ed but it was different from the regular population). My understanding is that Autism Spectrum Disorder is by and large not waiver-able.

My father's advice in this regard was basically lie to the recruiter and not say anything about it, but I feel like if I ever went to get a security clearance it would come up. Can you guys enlighten me on this? I'm not hell bent on joining the Navy, but I'm curious about whether or not its even a possibility I could consider.

DaNerd
Sep 15, 2009

u br?


Could you consider the possibility of lying to a recruiter? Yes and then hopefully come to the conclusion that it's dumb and you shouldn't want to join the Navy anyways.

For the clearance thing I had a buddy who got separated because he was defrauding his local government by modding his orders. He told the investigators during his TS/SCI investigation and they notified the district attorney's office. Busted him down from E6 to E3 and I've never seen him since, I assume that he lost his civilian employment as well.

For real though, don't join the armed forces to please anyone else. You'll hate it and end up resenting them and yourself.

not caring here
Feb 22, 2012

blazemastah 2 dry 4 u

You father is a loving idiot, you are correct, there is nothing good that can come from that.

A Bad Poster
Sep 25, 2006
Seriously, shut the fuck up.



Join the Army, he'll be even more disappointed than if you never served.

A White Guy
Dec 19, 2012

Never fear!
Japan is here!


DaNerd posted:

Could you consider the possibility of lying to a recruiter? Yes and then hopefully come to the conclusion that it's dumb and you shouldn't want to join the Navy anyways.

Yeah, this is essentially the conclusion that I've already come to. Lying to a recruiter about something that will almost definitely come out later is out and out stupid as gently caress.

What I'm curious about is - is it possible to get a waiver? My own research says probably not, but I'm wondering if anyone else has gone through the process at all.

The reason why I'm even asking is that my recent experience is kind of funneling me into toward working for the government. Recently, I did an exam for a position I was curious about, checked my ranking, and found I literally had 9,500+ people ahead of me in ranking on their exams. The vets were already first rank, ahead of even people who were first rank. I mean, sheesh. My father is most definitely a loving idiot, but he's hugely profited from his veteran status in his civilian life post-Navy. I can see the benefit of it. And with coronavirus and the Dow Jones plummetting like a bag of poo poo out of the heavens, this might be the right time to consider this stuff.

LingcodKilla
Dec 28, 2002

I ate too much crab and transformed into this.


At various points in this last decade you could get waivers for almost anything so go ahead and shoot for the moon.

Just donít lie.

Vahakyla
May 3, 2013

My battleboo just said "yeah, us. Ma'am. We'll be going to war. Not you."


It depends wildly on your spectrum, and like bazillion sub-factors. Very likely a disqualifying diagnosis, but waivereable.

Iím in the Army, and medical field. Iíve personally dealt with autistic servicemembers, both officers and enlisted. Only one of them joined during the surge, rest entered with ĒnormalĒ waiver weather.

Definitely doable, but a question that is stupid to answer here because of factors we donít see, and the variance in which physicians evaluate you. In the Army ascension process, your recruiter will put you into contact with the appropriate specialists, or at least help you in getting the right start. How it works in the Navy, no clue. Talk to an officer recruiter.

Donít lie. You lie about minor medical visits, or small poo poo. You donít lie about something that could play into your security clearance (which you need as an officer), and can put you into the big house, or torpedo your civilian prospects.

Vahakyla fucked around with this message at 20:48 on Mar 9, 2020

Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


Absolutely don't lie. You were a dependent. The military has your medical records already.

A White Guy
Dec 19, 2012

Never fear!
Japan is here!


Ok. Thanks for the answers dudes.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Godholio posted:

Absolutely don't lie. You were a dependent. The military has your medical records already.

Knew a cadet when I was in school who kept just saying weird stuff and doing really unwise/weird things. Turned out his O-6 dad had deliberately tried to hide a learning disability, going as far as having him essentially "un/re-diagnosed" in high school as having no learning disability. The cadet was a nice guy, but very clearly needed help to be successful in college. He was dropped from the ROTC program, and I don't know if he ended up finishing college. Once he got dropped from ROTC, he and his parents went all in on "sorry, university, but actually he needs help with stuff."

Who knows how many years of assistance this kid missed out on because his dad needed a legacy officer son so bad?

Woofer
Mar 2, 2020


tell your recruiter the truth.

your recruiter is the one who will lie for you, or advise you on how to just omit the truth (rather than lying... i guess?).

that's how it worked for me at least.

Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


Woofer posted:

tell your recruiter the truth.

your recruiter is the one who will lie for you, or advise you on how to just omit the truth (rather than lying... i guess?).

that's how it worked for me at least.

The DOD has his records. The best case scenario is that they notice his lie/omission early enough that it's not worth loving him on.

mlmp08
Jul 11, 2004


Nap Ghost

Godholio posted:

The DOD has his records.

Not necessarily. The DOD had his records, but may have lost them in a warehouse fire. China has his records.

Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


mlmp08 posted:

Not necessarily. The DOD had his records, but may have lost them in a warehouse fire. China has his records.



The warehouse fire was in the 70s. If he's looking to join now, he's not that old. And DOD stopped disposing of dependent records (you had to specifically request them otherwise they got shredded after a couple of years) sometime around in the 90s or so, so he probably missed that one, too.

Edit: I hadn't considered that if he lies, he's basically banking on the military bureaucracy's incompetence, which is not a bad bet to take.

LtCol J. Krusinski
May 7, 2013


Nm

Melthir
Dec 29, 2009

I need to go scrap some money together cause my avatar is just sad.


Computer touching mil goons. I'm looking into retirement and my broken body can not take much more. What are some good resources to get started that do not require full time dedication?

bird food bathtub
Aug 9, 2003



College Slice

Security+ is a pretty important certification and it's not that hard. I did it on my own with a $30 study guide, flash cards and a month or so of studying. That plus a clearance and basic trouble shooting skills (read: know how to use google) is basically a job offer right there.

zharmad
Feb 9, 2010


bird food bathtub posted:

Security+ is a pretty important certification and it's not that hard. I did it on my own with a $30 study guide, flash cards and a month or so of studying. That plus a clearance and basic trouble shooting skills (read: know how to use google) is basically a job offer right there.

This. Seriously, security+ and a clearance and you will have 3 job offers anywhere there's a reasonable sized base or post within 2 weeks. Hell, PM me and tell me where you want to work and I can probably get you set up with an interview in short order with my company.

Melthir
Dec 29, 2009

I need to go scrap some money together cause my avatar is just sad.


zharmad posted:

This. Seriously, security+ and a clearance and you will have 3 job offers anywhere there's a reasonable sized base or post within 2 weeks. Hell, PM me and tell me where you want to work and I can probably get you set up with an interview in short order with my company.

I'll get back to you once I figure it out.

Cyks
Mar 17, 2008


zharmad posted:

This. Seriously, security+ and a clearance and you will have 3 job offers anywhere there's a reasonable sized base or post within 2 weeks. Hell, PM me and tell me where you want to work and I can probably get you set up with an interview in short order with my company.

I got a job offer within a week of actually trying from clearancejobs making twice as much doing 100x less work in the same career field due to this combination. If you are willing to move to one of the hotspots you'll be fighting recruiters off you.

Security+ 501 isn't difficult but if you are new to the world of IT certifications it can be at first. Darril Gibson's book and website are enough to pass within a month of casually studying on your own.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!



Godholio posted:



The warehouse fire was in the 70s. If he's looking to join now, he's not that old. And DOD stopped disposing of dependent records (you had to specifically request them otherwise they got shredded after a couple of years) sometime around in the 90s or so, so he probably missed that one, too.

Edit: I hadn't considered that if he lies, he's basically banking on the military bureaucracy's incompetence, which is not a bad bet to take.

Just tell the recruiter the truth, and have him tell the dude to lie.

He'll either be found out during MEPS or early in bootcamp in processing, or whatever the officer equivalent is, or he'll never be found out. Probably the latter.

Like worst case he makes it two months in and the Navy goes "wait, you were EFM, wtf?" And they kick him out with an admin discharge.

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Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


That's the likely result, but the worst case is jail time, so yeah I probably wouldn't lie about something they'll certainly discover.

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